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The Hidden Worlds of the National Parks - Google Arts & Culture

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4 to 12
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Follow National Park Rangers on a remarkable journey in these 360-degree videos. Guides take viewers into the most interesting, yet unknown, places in six different park locations....more
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Follow National Park Rangers on a remarkable journey in these 360-degree videos. Guides take viewers into the most interesting, yet unknown, places in six different park locations. Choose a park to begin your journey, then after a short introduction, explore locations dragging the mouse or cursor around to view these sites from every angle. As you explore, guides provide additional information on each location.

tag(s): alaska (26), hawaii (8), landforms (47), national parks (19), states (164), video (276)

In the Classroom

Share this beautiful site and images on an interactive whiteboard or with a projector, then have students explore on their own. This site can be included with many different geography units to teach landforms found around the United States. Use as a starting point to learn more about our National Parks and Parks Service. Have students create an annotated image of other interesting geographic locations including text boxes and related links using a tool such as Thinglink, reviewed here. Challenge cooperative learning groups to create videos of behind the scenes information from your hometown, then share them on a site such as TeacherTube, reviewed here.

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Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature - University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries

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2 to 12
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The Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature is a digitized collection of a variety of children's literature from approximately 1896 to 1943. Use filters to narrow content...more
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The Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature is a digitized collection of a variety of children's literature from approximately 1896 to 1943. Use filters to narrow content by year, genre, publisher, and more. Some items in the collection offer different publications of the same text. Each thumbnail links to images includes the publication date and publisher information.

tag(s): book lists (133), digital storytelling (153), literature (274)

In the Classroom

Share older versions of children's classic books with students to compare with modern versions including print books and online videos. This literature collection is perfect for use with studies of the late 1800's and early 1900's as a primary source of information. For younger students or those with little technology experience, use an online tool such as Interactive Two Circle Venn Diagram, reviewed here, to compare different versions of texts. For older and more experienced technology students, use XMind, reviewed here, to make the comparisons of versions.

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Understanding Sacrifice - American Battle Monuments Commission & Dept of Veterans Affairs

Grades
6 to 12
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Understanding Sacrifice takes you beyond the facts and figures of World War II battles and provides activities based on the stories of fallen American heroes. Browse the site to find...more
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Understanding Sacrifice takes you beyond the facts and figures of World War II battles and provides activities based on the stories of fallen American heroes. Browse the site to find Northern Europe and Mediterranean battle sites or learn about individual fallen heroes. Choose the Activities link to view lessons correlated to Common Core Standards for grades 6-12. Search options also allow you to find lessons by grade level or subject. The videos reside on YouTube. If your district blocks YouTube, the videos may not be viewable. You could always view them at home and bring them to class "on a stick" to share. Use a tool such as Freemake Video Converter, reviewed here, to download the videos from YouTube.

tag(s): battles (19), heroes (25), veterans (21), world war 2 (142)

In the Classroom

This site is a must-see for any teachers of World War II history. Take students beyond the information about battles to learn about individuals and their role and sacrifices. Be sure to take advantage of the extensive information included in each activity including assessments, lesson extensions, and adaptations. Have students choose one of the stories, then research the battle to learn more about the event's relationship to the war. Have students create maps using Animaps, reviewed here. Students can add text, images, and battle locations to tell the story of fallen heroes. Ask local veterans to visit your classroom and share their stories with your class.

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Founding Principles: American Governance in Action - Bowdoin College

Grades
6 to 12
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American Governance in Action is a 15 chapter video series providing an overview of the fundamental tenets of the American Government. Videos run approximately 15 minutes or less, and...more
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American Governance in Action is a 15 chapter video series providing an overview of the fundamental tenets of the American Government. Videos run approximately 15 minutes or less, and the narration by Andrew Rudalevige, a professor at Bowdoin College, is easy to understand. Each video also includes a transcript; use the search box to find and highlight terms discovered in the narrative.

tag(s): branches of government (50), civil rights (123), congress (34), constitution (87), elections (78), electoral college (17), presidents (132), supreme court (23)

In the Classroom

Watch videos together as a class, or flip your class and have students watch at home before introducing lessons on the government in class. Allow students to watch videos at their own pace on 1:1 devices or at home, then create a simple infographic sharing their findings using Piktochart, reviewed here. Challenge cooperative learning groups to create podcasts demonstrating their understanding of one of the concepts of American Governance. Use a site such as podOmatic, reviewed here.

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Hamilton - The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History/Ron Chernow

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6 to 12
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The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History provides an extensive collection of resources on Alexander Hamilton. Scroll through the site to find essays, primary sources, teaching...more
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The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History provides an extensive collection of resources on Alexander Hamilton. Scroll through the site to find essays, primary sources, teaching resources, and more. Create a free account with a school-affiliated email address to access the site and all of its features.

tag(s): 1700s (29), american revolution (89), constitution (87)

In the Classroom

Discover the many ready-to-go, free resources on this site when teaching about the Founding Fathers and the Constitution. Make a splash with visual learners by starting class with artifacts from this site displayed on a projector or interactive whiteboard. Explore primary sources and historical texts as part of a Common Core literacy program cooperating among English, reading, and history teachers. Have students sign up to enjoy access to all the resources. Challenge cooperative learning groups to explore information on the site and become Hamilton "experts." Have the groups create presentations to share with the class about what they learn using Presentious, reviewed here, or Slides, reviewed here.
 This resource requires PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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You Decide: Jefferson or Hamilton? A Biography of America - PBS Learning Media California

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6 to 12
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Whom do you believe had the most enduring vision for America, Thomas Jefferson or Alexander Hamilton? Launch this interactive to learn more about the beliefs of each statesman and choose...more
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Whom do you believe had the most enduring vision for America, Thomas Jefferson or Alexander Hamilton? Launch this interactive to learn more about the beliefs of each statesman and choose the vision that you believe would be best for America. Throughout the interactive, view several sets of statements and make choices before coming to a final decision. When complete, compare your thoughts to others who voted.

tag(s): 1700s (29), constitution (87), jefferson (20)

In the Classroom

This interactive provides a perfect introduction to any unit on the Constitution. Ask students to complete the short quiz, then compare their response to others. Create a quick poll (with no membership required) using SurveyRock, reviewed here, to view responses from your class. Have students make an interactive multimedia presentation after researching Hamilton or Jefferson using a tool like Sway, reviewed here, or Zeetings, reviewed here. Take advantage of the discussion questions on this site to encourage students to think about the visions of our government leaders.

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Alexander Hamilton: Early Influences - PBS Learning Media California

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6 to 12
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This three minute video tells the story of Alexander Hamilton's difficult youth and early career working for an export company. Support materials include additional information on Hamilton...more
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This three minute video tells the story of Alexander Hamilton's difficult youth and early career working for an export company. Support materials include additional information on Hamilton and discussion questions. This site also includes correlation to National Standards for History.

tag(s): 1700s (29), constitution (87)

In the Classroom

View this video together as a class as an introduction to lessons on Alexander Hamilton, the Constitution, or slavery. Flip your lessons and have students watch the video before class. Use the Discussion Questions from the site to challenge students to research other Founding Fathers. Have students or groups share what they know about Hamilton using Padlet, reviewed here. The Padlet application creates free online bulletin boards. Encourage students to research Alexander Hamilton's later life, then upload a photo they have encountered (with proper credit, of course) and add voice bubbles to explain what they learned using a tool such as Superlame, reviewed here.

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Election 2016: Stumped!? - NewseumEd

Grades
6 to 12
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Don't shy away from teaching about the elections because of all the nastiness and confusion. Instead get help from NewseumEd's latest Collection: Election 2016: Stumped!? Study the...more
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Don't shy away from teaching about the elections because of all the nastiness and confusion. Instead get help from NewseumEd's latest Collection: Election 2016: Stumped!? Study the historical conditions and circumstances of controversial political campaigns to gain an understanding of today's campaign tactics and messages. Go back as far as the 1880s to learn about mudslinging and nasty accusations in the election and where and when nasty ads got their start. This NewseumEd Collection approaches understanding by using primary sources and case studies (use the drop down menu for Education Collection). The case studies start at the very beginning of an election and go right through to the end. They all include lesson plans with an issue summary, debate question, tools for organizing evidence for the discussions, election essentials, primary sources, guiding questions, and an extension activity. Optional resources for some of the case studies include NewseumEd's Pinterest pages (links provided with those Case Studies). To get started there are a few helpful interactives to go with this Collection: the Political Personality Quiz, Candidate Match, and Predict the Election. Registration with NewseumEd is necessary to access all sources, but is entirely free.

tag(s): democracy (13), elections (78), presidents (132), primary sources (90)

In the Classroom

Whether the nation or your local government is going through an unpleasant, combative election campaign, or even during a yearly unit on the elections this collection from Newseum will help students understand our political system. Pique student interest by having them take the Political Personality Quiz. In small groups have students discuss whether or not they agree with the results. Next, you may want to use the Candidate Match to refine their political profile further, and then discuss how they feel about the candidate they matched up with and why they feel that way. While using any or all of the case studies with your students, don't forget to download the Activity, Handout, and Worksheet. All of the case studies have discussion topics.

All students need to have a voice during discussions, whether discussing as a class or in small groups, allow everyone to share their opinions and concerns using a backchannel tool for the class such as TodaysMeet, reviewed here, or with older students, in small groups, using a tool like Slack, reviewed here. Extension activities encompass making charts, lists, (use tools like 25 Language Arts Graphic Organizers, reviewed here, or Holt Interactive Graphic Organizers, reviewed here), researching a candidate creating a slogan and explaining why the slogan fits that candidate, and creating a campaign event. For the latter two extension suggestions use a tool such as Adobe Spark, reviewed here.

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TeachersFirst's Resources for Memorial Day - TeachersFirst

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K to 12
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Explore these resources for ideas you can use to connect classroom curriculum to Memorial Day. Whether you choose to focus on Memorial Day and its history for one class period ...more
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Explore these resources for ideas you can use to connect classroom curriculum to Memorial Day. Whether you choose to focus on Memorial Day and its history for one class period or to include a special curriculum project in honor of veterans, these ideas and resources will get you started.

tag(s): memorial day (13)

In the Classroom

Share these resources with your students as you learn about Memorial Day. Create a cross-curricular project by having students research the history of the holiday and then write a letter or poem.

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Who, Me? Biased? - New York Times

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5 to 12
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Explore bias through this series of videos from the New York Times. Using titles such as Peanut Butter, Jelly, and Racism, and Why We're Awkward, this series explores types ...more
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Explore bias through this series of videos from the New York Times. Using titles such as Peanut Butter, Jelly, and Racism, and Why We're Awkward, this series explores types of bias, how to address and change prejudices, and ways to address racism. Most videos run around 2 minutes in length, making them perfect for a short introduction to the topics addressed.
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tag(s): black history (61), bullying (52), civil rights (123), diversity (35), racism (19), tolerance (10)

In the Classroom

Share videos with students either with a projector, an interactive whiteboard, or use the link or embed codes on your class website to view at home. Have students view from home using VideoAnt, reviewed here, where students can stop the video and ask questions about the parts where they need clarification on the video! Have cooperative learning groups create podcasts sharing their insight into biases and racism along with suggestions on ways to address each problem. Use a site such as podOmatic, reviewed here. Share this site with your school's counselor for use with ongoing lessons in tolerance and diversity.

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Students Investigating Primary Sources - Florida Joint Center for Citizenship

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2 to 12
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Students Investigating Primary Sources is a series of lessons designed through a collaboration with the National Archives, Pinellas County Public Schools, and Brevard Public Schools...more
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Students Investigating Primary Sources is a series of lessons designed through a collaboration with the National Archives, Pinellas County Public Schools, and Brevard Public Schools for 2nd grade through High School Students. Choose from topics including separation of power and women's right to vote. Each lesson correlates to National Standards and a PDF link to the original activity including vocabulary, handouts, and other necessary materials.

tag(s): branches of government (50), civil rights (123), constitution (87), primary sources (90), womens suffrage (26)

In the Classroom

Benefit from the free lessons on this site for use when teaching the use of primary sources. Challenge younger students to demonstrate concepts learned by creating a presentation using slides, reviewed here, and older students to use a presentation tool from Lucidpress, reviewed here. The easy drag and drop features of Lucidpress allow you to personalize flyers, posters, presentations, and more. Ask students to incorporate primary sources and other research materials into an interactive timeline using Timeglider, reviewed here, as a visual look at historical events over a certain period.
 This resource requires PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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Immigrant Stories - Immigration History Research Center Univ of Minnesota

Grades
6 to 12
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Immigrant Stories is a collection of videos sharing personal and family immigration stories. Add your story to the collection by following posted instructions and video tutorials. View...more
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Immigrant Stories is a collection of videos sharing personal and family immigration stories. Add your story to the collection by following posted instructions and video tutorials. View all of the stories here. Each short video includes information about the participant and a downloadable transcript. Click on tags to find additional videos from participants discussing the same country or region.

tag(s): immigrants (21), immigration (58), migration (59)

In the Classroom

Have your ESL/ELL students share their stories here (with permission from parents) when doing a biography writing unit. Have all students search for stories of immigrants whose ethnic background resembles their own. Have each student choose one story to read about and share a quick multimedia project with the class, such as a simple online posters using PicLits, reviewed here. Ask students who have a relative who is an immigrant to interview them, and then use a tool such as the 3 Circle Venn Diagram, reviewed here, to compare the experiences. This could be done using a story from the same country, or other countries. Use stories from this site as a writing prompt for a poem or digital story about an aspect of immigrant life, asking students to put themselves in the immigrant's shoes. For presentations of digital stories challenge students to use UtellStory, reviewed here. This tool allows narrating and adding text to a picture. For the advanced digital atudent and teacher challenge them to create their story as a game using Pencil Code Gym, reviewed here.
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National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection Stories - National Museum of African American History and Culture

Grades
4 to 12
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These Collection Stories look at the personal feelings and interpretation of the objects staff members have cataloged in the Museum. These stunning short stories focus on items from...more
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These Collection Stories look at the personal feelings and interpretation of the objects staff members have cataloged in the Museum. These stunning short stories focus on items from historical events and famous people. One example is Dress for the Occasion; view the first day of school dress worn by Carlotta Walls as she entered Little Rock Central High School in 1957 as part of the Little Rock Nine's integration efforts. Other stories take a look at Muhammed Ali, Carl Lewis, The Wiz: The Supersoul Musical 'Wizard of Oz,' and the watches that survived a brutal assassination (Moments Captured in Time).

tag(s): african american (113), black history (61), cross cultural understanding (117)

In the Classroom

Share stories from this collection to provide a personal look at events from African-American history in the United States. Use stories as an example, and ask students to find additional artifacts from the National Museum and research to discover the story behind the item, or have students bring an item from their home to tell the story of its history. For either of these ideas, encourage students to create online books for sharing the stories using a tool such as Ourboox, reviewed here. Ask students to find local residents with knowledge of historical events to come talk to your class about the "behind the scenes" story, or set up a Skype call with an African-American leader. Use these stories for informational reading in your Language Arts classroom, and as a wonderful resource to use for covering the informational reading standards required with the CCSS.

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Free School - YouTube Channel - FreeSchool

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K to 8
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FreeSchool, a YouTube Channel, provides an extensive selection of educational videos and adds two new videos each week. Videos provide content in art, music, science, literature, and...more
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FreeSchool, a YouTube Channel, provides an extensive selection of educational videos and adds two new videos each week. Videos provide content in art, music, science, literature, and more. Browse through the site to find content or choose the playlists to find videos by specific topics. Most videos run less than 10 minutes in length making them perfect for use in many situations. If your district blocks YouTube, the videos may not be viewable. You could always view them at home and bring them to class "on a stick" to share. Use a tool such as Freemake Video Converter, reviewed here, to download the videos from YouTube.
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tag(s): angles (86), animals (290), biographies (88), fractions (235), grammar (214), literature (274), martin luther king (38), planets (127), punctuation (43), scientific method (67), space (217), states (164), weather (194)

In the Classroom

Use as a way to introduce new topics or subjects to establish background knowledge. Share these videos on your projector or interactive whiteboard to provide an introduction (or review) on various topics. If you allow students to explore on their own, take caution since they could click and go elsewhere on YouTube. Share a link to this site with parents through your classroom website or newsletter for students to view at home.

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JuxtaposeJS - Knight Lab

Grades
5 to 12
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Compare and contrast two images with JuxtaposeJS photo slider, no registration required. Begin with links to your two images, JuxtaposeJS recommends using two pictures of the same size....more
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Compare and contrast two images with JuxtaposeJS photo slider, no registration required. Begin with links to your two images, JuxtaposeJS recommends using two pictures of the same size. Add labels and photo credits and choose from personalization options. Once uploaded, use the slider bar to adjust the viewing portions of the two images. Embed your finished image using the code provided after publication.

tag(s): history day (24), images (275), local history (14), photography (162)

In the Classroom

Use JuxtaposeJS to highlight then and now images of any location or building. Compare current cities to images taken many years ago. Compare and contrast pictures of major war battles to how they look in the present. Highlight changes in photographs over time. Compare and contrast changes in plants or animals. It may take some practice getting images to align properly; however, it is worth the time to create the visual presentation provided by this tool. Upload finished images to your class or student's websites. If you don't have a website, try a simple web page creator like Carrd, reviewed here, or newhive, reviewed here.

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Google Earth VR - Google Earth

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4 to 12
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Take a virtual tour of several of the world's most famous places with Google Earth VR's preview gallery. Begin by selecting from landmarks such as the Rome Colosseum or Hoover ...more
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Take a virtual tour of several of the world's most famous places with Google Earth VR's preview gallery. Begin by selecting from landmarks such as the Rome Colosseum or Hoover Dam. Move around with your cursor to see the 360-degree view, or watch as the preview takes you on tour. Be sure to click on the square icon near the bottom of each show to open up each virtual reality to a full-screen view.

tag(s): china (68), cultures (107), italian (34), mountains (15), renaissance (35), rome (28), virtual field trips (51)

In the Classroom

Immerse your students in your studies with a close-up, in-depth look through virtual field trips. Visit places where time, money, and mileage inhibit your dreams for bringing your students into wondrous worlds. Find ways to visit where your class has never gone before. Find the means to motivate your most reluctant learners. Small groups or individual students can focus on one of the tours and use as a starting point for additional research. ESL/ELL learners will appreciate the visual tours. Reach all types of learners through a class visit. Use these virtual reality tours as a whole class anticipatory guide, a center activity, a home connection, or even as extra credit. Challenge your gifted students to be guides to their own learning. Make your class go global! For other virtual tours, try Listly Virtual Field Trips, reviewed here.

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Vivid Color Photos from the Great Depression - Christopher Woody/Business Insider

Grades
7 to 12
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Take a look at real Depression-era photos in color instead of the typical black and white from this period. Through the use of color transparencies, these photos, taken between 1939...more
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Take a look at real Depression-era photos in color instead of the typical black and white from this period. Through the use of color transparencies, these photos, taken between 1939 and 1941, provide a contrast to the difficult life faced by many during this time. Scroll through to view the images and short descriptions, or change the view to watch as a slide show.
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tag(s): 1900s (36), 20th century (53), great depression (25), images (275)

In the Classroom

Share these images and descriptions with students as part of your lessons on 20th century America. Have students choose an image as a creative writing prompt or as inspiration for further research. Share typical black and white Depression-era photos and these colorized images, then use an online tool such as Interactive Two Circle Venn Diagram, reviewed here, to compare and contrast differences including emotional reactions to images. Have students create timelines (with music, photos, videos, and more) using Capzles, reviewed here, defining important 20th-century events.

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Civil Rights History Project - National Museum of African American History and Culture

Grades
6 to 12
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The Civil Rights History Project provides the personal stories of Civil Rights activists from the 1950's and 1960's through video interviews. Each interview also includes a written...more
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The Civil Rights History Project provides the personal stories of Civil Rights activists from the 1950's and 1960's through video interviews. Each interview also includes a written transcript for download. Each interviewee is a member of The Freedom Movement and discusses their early life as an African-American and how it led to their role in the Civil Rights movement.

tag(s): african american (113), black history (61), civil rights (123), interviews (17), video (276), women (92)

In the Classroom

Share these videos on an interactive whiteboard or with a projector as part of any Civil Rights unit. Include a link to the interviews on your class web page. After watching a video, have students research more about the events discussed. Have students create online newsletters individually or in a small group using a tool like Sway, reviewed here. Challenge students to create maps using Animaps, reviewed here, to share stories and events from the Civil Rights Movement. Students can add text, images, and location stops!

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Retouching the Canvas: The Creation of the Bill of Rights - Teaching America History

Grades
6 to 12
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Use this interactive to see the creation of the Bill of Rights and ratification of the United States Constitution. Begin with Delaware, the first state to ratify, and follow links ...more
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Use this interactive to see the creation of the Bill of Rights and ratification of the United States Constitution. Begin with Delaware, the first state to ratify, and follow links to view records of debates, a timeline, and a map of voting history in the state. Continue along the interactive to see the progression of ratification of the Bill of Rights through completion in 1791 with Virginia's approval providing the 2/3 majority required. The timeline continues through to Rhode Island's ratification of the constitution.

tag(s): american revolution (89), bill of rights (29), constitution (87)

In the Classroom

Introduce this site on your interactive whiteboard or projector. Then have students explore it independently or in small groups. After exploring the site, challange students to make timelines (with music, photos, videos, and more) using Capzles, reviewed here, to demonstrate ratification of the Bill of Rights or the Constitution. Create a class newspaper detailing events from the time period using a tool such as the Printing Press, reviewed here.
 This resource requires Adobe Flash.

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Jason Townsend & Son YouTube Channel - Jason Townsend

Grades
6 to 12
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Learn about 18th Century living through the many videos available on this YouTube Channel presented by a reenactment of this era. The majority of videos focus on food and cooking ...more
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Learn about 18th Century living through the many videos available on this YouTube Channel presented by a reenactment of this era. The majority of videos focus on food and cooking methods such as food preservation and different uses for cooking tools. Be sure to check out the many playlists such as Historic Sites, Block Printing Wallpaper/Fabric, Uncovering History in Art, and others that share information about 18th Century topics. If your district blocks YouTube, then they may not be viewable. You could always view the videos at home and bring them to class "on a stick" to share. Use a tool such as Freemake Video Converter, reviewed here, to download the videos from YouTube.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): 1700s (29), american revolution (89), cooking (35)

In the Classroom

Flip your classroom and use a video as homework. Have students take notes on the material and write down questions they still have and topics that confuse them. Or, use a tool like EdPuzzle, reviewed here, for students to pause videos and ask or answer questions right on the video. These activities can uncover misconceptions. Show the video to the class, and then discuss the concept at length. For more advanced classes, provide time for students to choose a video to view and research the underlying concept.

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