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Recycling Facts Guide - Recycling Facts Guide

Grades
7 to 12
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Get your recycling facts from this source. Find a mountain of information about recycling mountains of stuff! View a variety of articles on this site. Find the Categories drop down...more
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Get your recycling facts from this source. Find a mountain of information about recycling mountains of stuff! View a variety of articles on this site. Find the Categories drop down on the right side to choose particular types of recycling from Compost, Electronics, Oil, Recycling Equipment, and more. Enter email information to subscribe to their newsletter at the bottom of the site.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): conservation (128), consumers (21), recycling (57), resources (112)

In the Classroom

Use the information on this site to inform students about the various items that can be recycled. Consider using the site as background information for student created surveys for students and their families to complete. Use the information from the surveys to develop a campaign to bring awareness to consumption and use patterns that can save money for families as well as landfill space. Create a survey or a poll using Obsurvey, reviewed here. Use this site for meeting the Common Core Standards for nonfiction reading. Provide a link to the Recycling Facts Guide on your class website. Create a student project where students use information on this site to create a campaign to promote awareness about recycling. Debate recycling and recycling programs by comparing information from this site and others as well as misconceptions many may have. Use the information here to establish a recycling campaign in your school or community. Use this site as inspiration to write a story or cartoon based on the life of a particular resource.

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News in Pictures - BBC

Grades
5 to 12
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See photographs and captions of current daily news from around the world. In addition to showing professional pictures, you can contribute your own special photos. Each photo included...more
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See photographs and captions of current daily news from around the world. In addition to showing professional pictures, you can contribute your own special photos. Each photo included a clickable caption. Click on the caption to view more photos and read simple explanations.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): news (265), newspapers (97), photography (162)

In the Classroom

Use the photos on this page as a jumping off site for many activities. Challenge students to read about the same topic/news using a different site and then writing a comparison essay. Students can submit their own photos for consideration. Students can learn summary writing by looking at these photos and writing briefly what happened. Have students create a multimedia presentation using Thinglink, reviewed here.This site allows users to narrate a picture. Challenge students to upload a copyright-safe photo, and then narrate as if it were a news report. Students of multiple ability levels can respond to the photos, each at their own ability level.

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WE THE ECONOMY 20 Short Films You Can't Afford to Miss - Vulcan Productions/Cinelan

Grades
9 to 12
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Build your understanding of the U.S. economy through a creative, well-organized collection of short films (5-8 min) designed to explain 20 key concepts that any informed citizen needs...more
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Build your understanding of the U.S. economy through a creative, well-organized collection of short films (5-8 min) designed to explain 20 key concepts that any informed citizen needs to understand. Unlike many informational films, these are quite engaging. The collection is divided into five chapters on Economy, Money, The Role of Government, Globalization, and Inequality. All of us can better understand how our economy works from watching these films and exploring some of the follow-up discussion suggestions, even among adults. Teachers can obtain a link to free, downloadable lesson materials, activities, and extensions by filling out a form with their email address. (The email comes within a few minutes but watch your SPAM filter. It may be better to request the link via a home email to avoid school filtering!) The teacher materials include correlations to CCSS standards in ELA, Math, and Writing. The content of the films and lessons supports many major concepts of economics and government included in state and other standards. App versions are available for both iOS and Android.

tag(s): DAT device agnostic tool (170), money (191), supply and demand (5)

In the Classroom

Sign up to download the support materials and plan one or several lessons to demystify the economy as part of a civics/government class or an economics course. Assign students to watch films in small groups and create digital booklets explaining the key concepts to the class using a multimedia tool such as Calameo, reviewed here. As economic issues come up in current events or during an election cycle, use these films to explain the underlying issues.

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The Center on Congress - Indiana University

Grades
7 to 12
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Indiana University's Center on Congress partners with the Library of Congress and its effort to promote teaching with primary sources to provide a rich set of resources, lesson plans,...more
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Indiana University's Center on Congress partners with the Library of Congress and its effort to promote teaching with primary sources to provide a rich set of resources, lesson plans, and activities related to the history, function, and actions of the US Congress. Activities are divided by theme, such as citizen participation, criticism of Congress, and the impact of Congress. Many activities include comics to keep your attention. There is a good overview of using primary sources in teaching. Lesson plans are tied to state standards. In addition to the lesson plans developed by the Center on Congress, there is also a bank of teacher-submitted lesson plans.

tag(s): branches of government (50), civil rights (123), comics and cartoons (71), congress (34), politics (100), primary sources (90), womens suffrage (26)

In the Classroom

Clearly, this is a great resource for those teaching civics or US government. These activities will also be useful to US History teachers, as the issues covered span important political eras. For example, there are activities related to women's suffrage, the child labor movement, the GI Bill and the development of the Interstate Highway system. Lesson plans range from those designed to cover several days, to short "Congressional moments" videos perfect for introducing a concept or sparking class discussion. A number of the lesson plans and activities are designed specifically for iPads. Of note also is the fact that the video clips on the site are not links to YouTube, so will not pose an access problem for school districts that block the site.

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IFL Science - IFL Science

Grades
7 to 12
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Discover a constantly changing, blog-style collection of articles about all areas of science, designed to engage readers in science and instill a desire to learn more. The articles...more
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Discover a constantly changing, blog-style collection of articles about all areas of science, designed to engage readers in science and instill a desire to learn more. The articles are grouped into headings such as Environment, Technology, Space, Health and Medicine, The Brain, Plants and Animals, Physics, and Chemistry. Articles share recent discoveries, timely experiments to try (such as cold weather explorations during winter), and intriguing (but true) revelations about scientific mysteries. There are topics of interest to almost any reader, such as "Why Most Food Labels Are Wrong About Calories" or "How Smartphones Can Lead The Fight Against Air Pollution." Click tags to find similar articles. Note that subject material is intended for adults, though our editors found nothing objectionable in the actual articles shared by IFLScience. Avoid clicking on ads and items under "More Stories" and "From the Web," as these lead to other sites of less predictable quality. If sharing this site with teens, be sure to point out which links stay within IFLScience. The site does allow reader comments from the general public. Preview if sharing in a classroom.
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tag(s): brain (71), environment (321)

In the Classroom

Share this site for students to explore informational articles related to what they are currently studying or to explore the many aspects of science not included in standard school curriculum. Challenge student partners to find an article they enjoy and share it creatively as a poster or mock interview with the scientists involved. They can use a simple tool such as Magazine Cover Maker (reviewed here) or actually make a video "interview" and share it on TeacherTube (reviewed here). Have your gifted students explore articles to extend required curriculum. Use this site for career day explorations about the many places where scientists work.

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PBS Newshour Extra - PBS NewsHour Productions LLC

Grades
7 to 12
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Find news and resources for grades 7-12 at PBS Newshour Extra. Search the site by Subject Area, Videos, Arts and Media, Science, and more. Explore news articles written for students...more
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Find news and resources for grades 7-12 at PBS Newshour Extra. Search the site by Subject Area, Videos, Arts and Media, Science, and more. Explore news articles written for students with the background and context needed to understand complex topics. The Daily Videos are ad-free and have related stories along the right side of the page. Read the current events news stories and follow the Extra Twitter feed. Don't miss the many free lesson plans including current events, American history, health, government, holidays, and more. Lesson plans are all aligned to the Common Core standards. Lesson plan topics vary from "Personal reflections on the poetry of Maya Angelou" to "Selma to Montgomery: An introduction to the 1965 marches" and countless others! Look for the Student Voices and Student Reporting Labs for those who would like to be published or to help a local PBS station produce the news.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): civil rights (123), elections (78), holocaust (39), memorial day (13), news (265), poetry (224), video (274), women (92)

In the Classroom

Watch the news together on your interactive whiteboard or projector. Allow students to watch independently on laptops or at a learning station. Use any video or article as a current events writing prompt. Challenge students to create blog posts about them using Throwww, reviewed here. Throwww allows you to create "quick and easy" blog posts for one-time use only. Don't forget the many free lesson plans (already aligned to Common Core standards). Click on the Lesson Plans link to explore the countless topics available (Poetry, Veterans, Elections, Ebola, Civil Rights, and more). For articles and videos about conflicts and tension, you might want to have your students engage in a debate using a tool such as ProConIt, reviewed here. Keep your class up-to-date on the news using this site. Provide this link on your class website for students (and families) to access both in and out of your classroom.
 This resource requires Adobe Flash.

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Interactive Science and Technology Timeline - ITN Source

Grades
3 to 12
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Discover how technology has changed lives with this interactive timeline beginning in 1900 and chronicling events through the introduction of the iPad in 2010. Each video skips ahead...more
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Discover how technology has changed lives with this interactive timeline beginning in 1900 and chronicling events through the introduction of the iPad in 2010. Each video skips ahead 10 years (1900, 1910, 1920, and so on.) Move the circle to any point on the timeline to view a video featuring events from that period in time. Pop up text offers more information and trivia from each period.

tag(s): 1900s (36), 1910s (9), 1920s (16), 1930s (15), 1940s (13), 1950s (12), 1960s (30), 1970s (12), 1980s (9), 20th century (53), aircraft (24), timelines (64)

In the Classroom

View the timeline on your interactive whiteboard (or projector) to help students understand the many changes in technology in the past 100+ years. Use the timeline to introduce a unit on any decade of the 1900s. Challenge students to research events further. Have students use Fakebook (reviewed here) to create a "fake" page similar in style to Facebook about a president, famous scientist, or other person from a particular era shared in the video clips.

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Listen Current - Listen Current

Grades
6 to 12
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The availability of high quality visual resources has exploded in recent years, but we should not forget about the value of listening, undistracted by color and movement. Listen Current...more
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The availability of high quality visual resources has exploded in recent years, but we should not forget about the value of listening, undistracted by color and movement. Listen Current has gathered together stories from public radio broadcasts and organized them into a rich resource for learning about current events, English language arts, social studies, and science. Each audio story is accompanied by lesson plans tied to state standards and the Common Core. Use the keyword search to discover resources by topic, or access Listen Current every day for timely current events stories. Sort topics by grade level (middle school or high school), topic, or curriculum area. Using the site requires registration, and there is a fee-based Premium version. The free version, however, includes lesson plans, current events and resources such as vocabulary lists and listening guides.
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tag(s): listening (92), news (265)

In the Classroom

Carving out some regular classroom time for students to "put on their listening ears" and focus on an auditory experience helps develop an important learning skill. Share the stories on a projector or interactive whiteboard. If you are in a BYOD classroom, have students listen on their own computers (with earbuds). Start the day with a short (4-5 minute) current event story and keep students engaged in timely news discussions. Choose a keyword or topic relevant to an ongoing lesson and introduce authentic participant voices to the discussion. Flip your classroom and have students listen to the story at home before the lesson. Have students report back to the class or a small group about what they learned. Consider using these audio lessons for English language learners to develop their skills using rich, relevant content.

Comments

Engaging, CCSS-aligned, and easy to use. Highly recommend. Warren, TN, Grades: 6 - 12

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Lowell Milken Center for Unsung Heroes - Lowell Milken Center

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5 to 12
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The Lowell Milken Center discovers, develops and communicates the stories of Unsung Heroes who have made a profound and positive impact on the course of history. Explore Featured Projects...more
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The Lowell Milken Center discovers, develops and communicates the stories of Unsung Heroes who have made a profound and positive impact on the course of history. Explore Featured Projects to learn about everyday people who became heroes by standing up to adversity in their lives. Each project features information about the hero and the storyteller. Some projects include links to student-created web pages and videos. If your district blocks YouTube, the videos may not be viewable. You could always view the videos at home and bring them to class "on a stick" to share. Use a tool such as KeepVid reviewed here to download the videos from YouTube. Start your own Unsung Hero project using the ten steps provided to include inspiration from start to finish.

tag(s): heroes (26)

In the Classroom

Share stories from the Unsung Heroes project on your interactive whiteboard or projector. Discuss traits that make a hero and find inspiration to search for heroes in your everyday lives. Use this site as a starting point for individual or group projects. All types of classes can complete a project about an unsung hero. P.E. classes can find out about veterans, surfers, or car accident victims who have lost limbs and used their challenges to make a difference. Math and science students can complete an Internet search for high school inventors. Students could also search through old Scholastic Scope magazines for articles about young people who have overcome adversity. Have students create an annotated image of a hero including text boxes and related links using a tool such as Thinglink, reviewed here. Have students use Fakebook, reviewed here, to create a "fake" page similar in style to Facebook about a hero they have chosen.
 This resource requires Adobe Flash.

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Wake Up, America! World War I Propaganda Posters - University of North Carolina

Grades
6 to 12
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Governments have used propaganda throughout history to shape public opinion. During World War I, average Americans were not in favor of getting involved in what began as a European...more
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Governments have used propaganda throughout history to shape public opinion. During World War I, average Americans were not in favor of getting involved in what began as a European conflict. The US Government used propaganda posters in an attempt to change that attitude and convince the populace that US intervention was needed. This collection of 23 World War I era propaganda posters chronicles that attempt, and provides insight into why particular images were chosen and how these images were designed to sway beliefs about the war.

tag(s): advertising (33), england (58), europe (75), france (40), germany (28), propaganda (12), world war 1 (53)

In the Classroom

The study of propaganda is an important adjunct to understanding how governments can shape the views of their citizens; the US is no exception. This slideshow can provide visual impact to a discussion of the US decision to enter World War I. Are there images used today that are designed to change public opinion? How can we learn to recognize propaganda and distinguish it from more unbiased information? Use this tool in art class and challenge students to create their own propaganda (or advertisement) posters. Discuss what moods certain colors evoke in the pictures. Unfortunately, there seems to be no good way to present the images full screen, which would give them more impact on an interactive whiteboard or projector. The slideshow would also be a useful resource for students researching propaganda in general.

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Fort McMoney - David Dufresne

Grades
10 to 12
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Fort McMoney is a web video and strategy simulation based on the Fort McMurray oil sands development in Alberta, Canada. Watch the trailer for background information on the project...more
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Fort McMoney is a web video and strategy simulation based on the Fort McMurray oil sands development in Alberta, Canada. Watch the trailer for background information on the project before playing the game. Play three rounds with players from around the globe over a period of four weeks to reimagine Fort McMurray making strategic financial and environmental decisions. Be sure to scroll completely down the page to view and understand all instructions before beginning play. Also, each of the three episodes contains a trailer setting up the episode. Be sure to preview before sharing with less mature students, as the trailer for episode one contains drinking and party scenes that may not be appropriate for classroom viewing.

tag(s): canada (30), environment (321), oil (45)

In the Classroom

Explore and experiment with the simulation so you understand it or have a small team of students preview it to explain it to the class. Set up games for use on classroom computers to avoid students viewing the trailer for episode one. View the trailer for episode two together on your interactive whiteboard to introduce the activities to your class. Use the simulation of Fort McMoney as an ongoing classroom project while studying the environmental impact of government and business decisions. Create several groups in your class to participate and compare results of the different interactives. Have students create maps using Animaps (reviewed here) with locations facing important impact on the environment. Students can add text, images, and location stops!
 This resource requires Adobe Flash.

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Heganoo - Heganoo Team

Grades
4 to 12
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Create interactive, mobile-friendly story "maps" that include videos, links, forms, images, and even text. "Maps" can be images with clickable spots or a geographic map using Google...more
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Create interactive, mobile-friendly story "maps" that include videos, links, forms, images, and even text. "Maps" can be images with clickable spots or a geographic map using Google maps as an interface. You can create a story around an image. Some interesting maps in the Showcase are America's Biggest Rodeos, 2014 Nobel Prize Winners, Africa's Forever Wars, and North America 360. Sign up with a username, password, and email. Click on the three bars in the top left corner to see a menu. Look at Showcase story maps or create a new project. There are basic templates and a style editor to change colors of the map features. View maps on any device that can access the Internet. Share by embedding on your website or blog, via email, or through social networks.

tag(s): creative writing (168), descriptive writing (43), digital storytelling (154), maps (293), writing (364)

In the Classroom

Use maps for current events, geography, or much more. Use your interactive whiteboard or projector and show a sampler of Showcase maps to students. For example, share Great Women in History and The American Revolution. Consider asking a small team of students to create a Heganoo about a historic event or environmental issue you are studying. Have the student team demonstrate to the class how they created the project and how to use Heganoo at the same time. Heganoo would make a great project for any subject area. Students can create a Heganoo about a battle, a natural disaster, a famous scientist or mathematician, an author's life, or a short story you just read. Creating a Heganoo would be a good project for your gifted students to extend their learning about any subject.

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25 Maps and Charts That Explain America Today - Washington Post

Grades
8 to 12
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Learn about the states of our nation through maps and charts exploring who we are and how we live. Maps explore financial situations through income, number of millionaires, and home...more
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Learn about the states of our nation through maps and charts exploring who we are and how we live. Maps explore financial situations through income, number of millionaires, and home ownership. Other maps display political and religious divisions by state, tax rates, and housing statistics. Some maps delineate topics more suited for adult readers. Click links in each map description to view articles with more in-depth information. Preview specific maps before you share, as some content may not be appropriate for your classroom.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): demographics (19), financial literacy (80), maps (293), politics (100), religions (67)

In the Classroom

This site is excellent for enrichment or critical thinking about the U.S. and societal/governmental issues. Display a map on your projector or interactive whiteboard during political campaigns to ask why different politicians/parties have gained a foothold in certain states or locations. Include links to specific maps from it on your class web page for students to access both in and out of class. Have students create a simple infographic sharing their findings using Venngage reviewed here. Have students create maps including local information using Animaps (reviewed here). Students can add text, images, and location stops!

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Venue - venue.com

Grades
6 to 12
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Venue used a traveling rig and interview studio to roam the North American landscape between 2012 and 2013 as a 21st century expedition. The expedition's purpose was "to document often...more
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Venue used a traveling rig and interview studio to roam the North American landscape between 2012 and 2013 as a 21st century expedition. The expedition's purpose was "to document often overlooked yet fascinating sites through the eyes of the innovators, trendsetters, entrepreneurs, and designers at the forefront of ideas today." Click on the Explore tab to view expedition photographs, and stories from a variety of perspectives: historic, scientific, and artistic. Each venue is a map marker that displays an area, usually far from a city center, showcasing human interaction with the Earth. Archives of Venue's travels cover much of the 50 states. Click on the map to view the map points. Click on a map point to see information for that particular site. All age groups will find the stories (such as Tales from the Crash) fascinating, excellent examples of how science, storytelling, and art come together.

tag(s): digital storytelling (154), forests (30), genetics (95), geology (82), maps (293), STEM (150)

In the Classroom

In a geography or social studies class, begin discussions of certain locations by starting with a Venue story. In language arts or science classes begin discussions with the science behind the story. Zoom the map out to find artistic and historic markers in your area. Explore photographs to serve as inspiration for stories. Students can choose a location to research and report on to the class. Use this as an inspiration to create your own "Venue" in your area. Students can find interesting places in your area, research the history, collect images, videos, and interviews associated with the place or an event. This would be a perfect cross curricular project! Create an online display of the student work using a wiki or blog.

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Ask for Evidence - askforevidence.org

Grades
8 to 12
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Ask for Evidence steps in to find the facts behind product claims. Browse through stories for information on questions such as "Should we be Worried about 'Dirty' Stethoscopes?" or...more
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Ask for Evidence steps in to find the facts behind product claims. Browse through stories for information on questions such as "Should we be Worried about 'Dirty' Stethoscopes?" or "Claims about Cancer Fighting Foods." Create an account to ask your own questions. Be sure to view the "Understand Evidence" part of the site to find invaluable resources about how to find and understand reliable evidence. The site was created in the UK, so some of the pronunciations and spellings may differ from American English. Note: topics included may not all be classroom appropriate. Select and share specific articles if you are sharing this site with young people.

tag(s): advertising (33), evaluating sources (14), media literacy (60), politics (100)

In the Classroom

Use this site when discussing political or advertising claims with your students. Build critical thinking and questioning skills. Share specific articles with students as young as upper elementary. Share the "Understand Evidence" portion of the site with students before they begin any investigational reports or persuasive writing pieces. Use specific articles rather than the full site with less mature students. This site will give them experience reading informational text on claims they wonder about. Partner weaker readers with others who may be able to help them read the text-heavy articles. Have students create a simple infographic sharing their findings using Easel.ly, reviewed here, or Venngage, reviewed here.

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Collapsus: The Energy Risk Conspiracy - Submarine Channel

Grades
8 to 12
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Collapsus is a simulation that combines interactivity, animation, fiction, and documentary to look into the future as an imminent energy crisis affects ten young people. Participants...more
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Collapsus is a simulation that combines interactivity, animation, fiction, and documentary to look into the future as an imminent energy crisis affects ten young people. Participants make decisions about solutions to the energy crisis and leave a mark on a national and global scale. Live action footage along with animation helps characters understand each situation while vlog posts offer up to date information about the world and personal situations.

tag(s): energy (203), environment (321), problem solving (274)

In the Classroom

Collapsus is a great way to make students think about and discuss a real-world issue in a science class or even in a government class where you talk about the role of public policy in energy use. Explore and play Collapsus on your interactive whiteboard (or projector) as you debate and discuss choices. Have students explore individually or in groups and compare the impact of different decisions. Use an online tool such as the Interactive Two Circle Venn Diagram, reviewed here, to compare and contrast two different decision choices. Create a quick poll (with no membership required) using using Kwiqpoll, reviewed here, to use when making decisions as a class.
 This resource requires Adobe Flash.

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PeaceMaker - Impact Games

Grades
9 to 12
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PeaceMaker is an interactive inspired by real events in the Israel-Palestine conflict. Download the interactive game and install on most Windows or Mac computers in English, Arabic,...more
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PeaceMaker is an interactive inspired by real events in the Israel-Palestine conflict. Download the interactive game and install on most Windows or Mac computers in English, Arabic, or Hebrew. The game is based on real life events (completed in 2007 and copyright 2010). Click to read the Blog about the game in the context of events today. Once installed, choose one side of the society to lead and work to curb violence and find a path to peace. Along the way make decisions based on events that pop up in the world map. Your choice should lead to satisfying the needs of your people, and work toward a mutually satisfying cooperation with the other side. Be sure to watch the trailer for an overall view of activity components. This trailer and other videos are hosted on YouTube. If your district blocks YouTube, they may not be viewable. You could always view the videos at home and bring them to class "on a stick" to share. Use a tool such as KeepVid, reviewed here, to download the videos from YouTube.

tag(s): conflict resolution (9), israel (17), middle east (35), palestine (7), problem solving (274)

In the Classroom

Include Peacemaker in units on current world events or the Middle East to help students understand the complexities in this tumultuous zone. Download and install PeaceMaker onto classroom computers (or request it from your tech department if you do not have admin access). Let students peruse it individually or in pairs. Share the activity on your interactive whiteboard (or projector) and discuss moves together as a class. PeaceMaker would be an interesting opening to any unit on conflict resolution, international conflict, or decision-making skills. You can also discuss the changes in the Middle East since this version was created, asking student groups to read current articles and then create a description of what they would ADD or change in the game to make it reflect the current Mid East developments
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Story of the Web - Jack Schofield

Grades
5 to 12
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Celebrate 25 years of the World Wide Web with this retrospective in interactive form. Scroll through to read about the first ideas and learn about the explosive growth and important...more
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Celebrate 25 years of the World Wide Web with this retrospective in interactive form. Scroll through to read about the first ideas and learn about the explosive growth and important events throughout the years. Choose auto-play to watch the timeline unfold or scroll at your own pace. As you progress through the story, watch for links to web stories. Viewers of the site share their personal memories each step along the way. Hover your mouse over the right side of your screen to link to the entire report in PDF format.

tag(s): computers (92), internet safety (108), inventors and inventions (95)

In the Classroom

Story of the Web is perfect for use on your interactive whiteboard or projector in a unit on technology and invention or in a computer literacy class. Share this site with students who have grown up on the Internet to provide an understanding of how quickly technology has developed. Compare it to the development of a human being over 25 years! Have students create a simple infographic sharing their findings using Easel.ly, reviewed here or Venngage reviewed here. Use an online tool such as Interactive Two Circle Venn Diagram (reviewed here) comparing communication 25 years ago to the present.
 This resource requires PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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Time and Date - Steffen Thorsen

Grades
K to 12
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Time and Date is your one-stop resource for anything concerning time zones, calendars, and weather. View current time for any place in the world, explore time zone maps, and create...more
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Time and Date is your one-stop resource for anything concerning time zones, calendars, and weather. View current time for any place in the world, explore time zone maps, and create and print personalized calendars. Explore the short news articles. Calculators and timers offer countdowns to any date. Find the number of days until a chosen date or tell the date in X number of days. Other options allow you to find the weather anywhere in the world, explore sun and moon phases, and browse through upcoming holiday events. There are also many free apps available to specific sections of this site (see the Apps link). There is a LOT here to explore!
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): calculators (41), calendars (46), DAT device agnostic tool (170), moon (74), sun (72), time (141), time zones (8), weather (194)

In the Classroom

Bookmark (or save in your favorites) Time and Date on your classroom computers for students to use throughout the year. Find out the local time and temperature in countries as you study them, count down the number of days until spring break or the end of the school year. Use the stopwatch or timer/alarm for timing class activities. Create a personal classroom calendar. This is a perfect addition to your Calendar Math lessons in elementary school. Share the site on your interactive whiteboard (or projector) as you count how many days you have been in school, daily weather, or a countdown to a special occasion. The possibilities are endless using all of Time and Date's features! Include time/date conversions for online conferences you will hold with parents who are deployed or traveling in different time zones. Share meeting dates/times for Skype sessions using the time conversions so everyone is "on time." Humor your fellow teachers by warning them of the upcoming full moon and its supposed effect on student behavior!

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Knoema - World Data Atlas - Knoema

Grades
6 to 12
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Just the facts, ma'am. Knoema's World Data Atlas provides a dizzying array of data about the countries of the world. Sort either by country (from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe), or by ...more
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Just the facts, ma'am. Knoema's World Data Atlas provides a dizzying array of data about the countries of the world. Sort either by country (from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe), or by topic (agriculture to water). Look at zoomable, color coded maps, and analyze rankings by topic. The interface is simple and direct, so if you are just looking for a statistic, you will find it quickly and easily. If you are looking at masses of authentic data to analyze or compare, you'll find that too. Click to create comparisons among any 2 to 3 countries. There is an introductory video available, hosted on YouTube. If YouTube is blocked at your school, you may need to view this video at home.

tag(s): atlas (6), data (150), infographics (45), map skills (82), maps (293), natural resources (60), resources (112), united nations (8)

In the Classroom

Bookmark this for student research, whether it be for individual country data or for comparative data by topic. Use the maps on an interactive whiteboard (or projector) to provide a visual representation of the data. This is a great source for authentic data for students to practice their analytic skills, or just to find out what the GDP of Antigua and Barbuda is. This is a resource that will see frequent use. Share it during math units on data, as well, so students have authentic numbers to "play with." Have them write their own data problems and questions for classmates to solve. Challenge your most able student to determine why two countries are so different.
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