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Daryl Cagle's Professional Cartoonists Index - MSNBC

Grades
6 to 12
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We know that today's students are far more accustomed to learning through images than students of the past. This site is a collection of the work of dozens of political ...more
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We know that today's students are far more accustomed to learning through images than students of the past. This site is a collection of the work of dozens of political cartoonists and is constantly updated to provide fresh content tied to the news of the day. The site is surprisingly deep, however, and has cartoon galleries that go back at least five years.

Teachers should be aware of several cautions however: Preview the cartoons collections for age-appropriateness; understand that the site does contain advertisements; and recognize that the images are copyright protected. Teachers are advised to post links to specific cartoons rather than trying to "cut and paste" the cartoons into websites or other documents.

tag(s): comics and cartoons (74), politics (99)

In the Classroom

Use the political cartoons on this site to introduce a class discussion on current events, civics, or government. Try using a cartoon as a writing prompt either for individual students or for collaborative work. Post a link to a particular cartoon or cartoon series on your classroom blog for discussion. Have students try to create a cartoon (either drawing or using computer generated images) depicting current events in the news.

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Dear Mrs. Roosevelt - New Deal Network

Grades
6 to 9
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This site uses letters written to Eleanor Roosevelt, the wife of Franklin D. Roosevelt, during the Depression, to teach lessons about that difficult time to younger students. Transcripts...more
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This site uses letters written to Eleanor Roosevelt, the wife of Franklin D. Roosevelt, during the Depression, to teach lessons about that difficult time to younger students. Transcripts of the letters are indexed, and most include the responses sent by Mrs. Roosevelt's secretary. In nearly all of the cases, the responses simply say that Mrs. Roosevelt gets so many requests for help that she cannot grant the children's requests. While this is certainly understandable, some students may find it surprising, as they have gotten used to "feel good" stories in the press about poor persons' wishes being granted. This may serve as an important discussion tool in helping students understand the very real distress suffered by many families during the Depression. The remainder of the site looks at several larger social service projects that Eleanor Roosevelt strongly supported, and which helped the poor in much more important ways than the granting of small requests by children.

tag(s): franklin (12), great depression (24), new deal (6), roosevelt (16)

In the Classroom

This site might serve as an important resource during a study of the Great Depression. It can be helpful for students to appreciate the individual hardships suffered by families; these stories are more real than the more complex accounts of financial disasters and bank failures. Students might also be encouraged to compare the requests of these children to their own "wish lists," or consider the ways that social service agencies ought to focus their efforts to assist the poor. Because this is a part of a larger site focused on the New Deal, there are extensive classroom resources and ideas for projects and lesson plans under the "classroom" link. The "library" link leads to a photo archive that could be used as part of a presentation on an Interactive Whiteboard or projector, and the "timeline" link places the Depression into a larger historical context.

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Citizen King - PBS Online

Grades
8 to 12
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This companion site to a PBS special focuses on the last five years of Dr. Martin Luther King's life, from his "I Have a Dream" Speech in 1963 to his ...more
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This companion site to a PBS special focuses on the last five years of Dr. Martin Luther King's life, from his "I Have a Dream" Speech in 1963 to his assassination in 1968. Highlights include a discussion of his non-violence philosophy, video perspectives, an interactive map of civil rights hot spots throughout the United States, several links to interactive timelines, and a teacher's guide. Several of the timelines focus on King's entire life (not just the final five years). This is a great resource for a 20th century American history class. This site requires Flash. You can get it from the TeachersFirst Toolbox page.

tag(s): 1960s (30), africa (180), african american (113), black history (59), civil rights (117), martin luther king (37)

In the Classroom

Share the interactive videos clips and timelines on your projector or interactive whiteboard. Take advantage of the ready-to-go teacher's guide (don't miss the "hints," that offer additional tips for using this site in your classroom). Use this site for research about the civil rights movement or the life of Martin Luther King, Jr.
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JA Titan--The Ultimate Business Simulation - Junior Achievement

Grades
9 to 12
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Junior Achievement presents this on-line simulation game for students interested in business and entrepreneurship. The simulation permits students to design a budget for their business...more
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Junior Achievement presents this on-line simulation game for students interested in business and entrepreneurship. The simulation permits students to design a budget for their business that includes setting the unit price, production levels, marketing expenses, research and development costs, capital investment level, and charitable giving. Players can consult with the "virtual vice-presidents" of the company in making their decisions and can play against the computer or against other teams on-line. The site also indicates that there is a school-based version of the simulation available from local Junior Achievement offices, including lesson plans and other teacher resources. Overall, the simulation is fairly formulaic and the interface is dated compared to current video games your students may play. The concepts might be useful, though, even if students may find the process of applying them through this simulation unexciting.

To fully use this site, you must register. Registration requires your name and email address. Check with your administrator about allowing the students to register for this site using their own names. You may wish to set up a class registration instead of entering true data into the registration site. Another option is to create a free Gmail account to use for memberships. If you plan to have students register individually, you may want to create your own Gmail account with up to 20 subaccounts for each group of students (by code name or number) within your classes. Here is a blog post that tells how to set up GMail subaccounts to use for any online membership service. This site requires Flash. You can get it from the TeachersFirst Toolbox page.

tag(s): business (58)

In the Classroom

Business or economic students can participate in this simulation either in groups or individually. There is the option to extend play across several sessions, and to compete against other groups on-line. Time might be allotted during class for teams to log on and play or the simulation might be assigned as a long-term homework project. If you combine this activity with extensions, such as creating spreadsheets for the mythical business or an advertising plan and multimedia materials, the project could take on a life of its own.
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The Mint: Fun Financial Literacy Activities for Kids, Teens, Parents and Teachers - Northwestern Mutual Foundation

Grades
6 to 12
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Economics and the stock market have taken center stage since the crises of 2008. This site provides a nice overview of the world of personal investment including sections on earning,...more
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Economics and the stock market have taken center stage since the crises of 2008. This site provides a nice overview of the world of personal investment including sections on earning, saving, spending, investing, giving, owing, safeguarding, and tracking. There are also a number of interactive features that can provide insight into the student's attitudes toward money. Online calculators help students understand how finance charges affect the "bottom line" for purchases bought on credit, and how saving in interest-bearing accounts can increase assets. The "Ideas for Teachers" link includes lesson plans and other tips for using the site in an educational setting. This site requires Flash. You can get it from the TeachersFirst Toolbox page.

tag(s): business (58), money (193)

In the Classroom

This site provides some great tools for use by students in a personal finance or "Real World" class, as well as information to supplement a discussion of economics or current events. You could also use it as a real world application of many math concepts or team teach middle school math and social studies together. Consider assigning the interactive quizzes as independent work, and using the topical overviews to accompany a lecture or class discussion. One drawback: the "sounds" that accompany mousing over your choices are very distracting. Consider turning down the sound (or hitting mute) on your computer if you use this site on an interactive whiteboard. Challenge students to write "financial" blogs offering advice, based on the information learned at this site. Or assign them to demonstrate competence with concepts such as per cent and interest by creating a financial advice column for a student online newspaper.
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Mashable: 50+ Places to Buy Groceries Online - Sean P. Aune

Grades
4 to 12
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Looking for a way to teach real shopping lessons without actually going to a store? This blog post includes links to online grocery shopping from all over the U.S. Since ...more
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Looking for a way to teach real shopping lessons without actually going to a store? This blog post includes links to online grocery shopping from all over the U.S. Since the stores are in business to make money they will, of course, include advertisements on their sites. Teachers will want to discuss advertising links and why students should avoid them to stay on task.

In the Classroom

Use these virtual stores to teach real-world lessons in math, FCS, ESL, ELL, and economics lessons. Special Ed teachers may also want to use these sites to help students with life skills. Have students compare pricing in online venues vs. bricks-and-mortar stores. Use the pricing to teach unit pricing, comparison shopping, percent, and more.

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Foreign Languages and Literature - MIT Open Courseware

Grades
8 to 12
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This site offers free comprehensive, interactive language and literature courses developed by MIT staff as part of their open course ware program. All courses include a regular syllabus...more
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This site offers free comprehensive, interactive language and literature courses developed by MIT staff as part of their open course ware program. All courses include a regular syllabus that features assignments, interactive activities, and other resources such as videos and slideshows. There is a wide range of language offerings; the cultural courses complement the language instruction and include topics such as popular culture, history, economics, media , and thinking skills. There are courses at the undergraduate and graduate levels. This site requires Adobe Acrobat. You can get it from the TeachersFirst Toolbox page.

tag(s): chinese (48), french (88), german (64), india (36), japan (61), japanese (42), latin (22), spanish (108)

In the Classroom

AP history, language, and economics students may find MIT's online course materials useful. MIT has committed to putting its entire curriculum on the web, and these early offerings include syllabi, reading materials, and a variety of subject-specific class notes. Before using these pages, students and parents should all be aware of what Open Courseware is and is not. Teachers at smaller schools may welcome the availability of language alternatives. Teachers of gifted who are looking for acceleration options will also find these courses valuable, though you will need to develop a means of doing assessment if your students are to earn credit for them.
 This resource requires PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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The Online NewsHour Extra: Video Clipboard - PBS

Grades
6 to 12
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Are you looking for a new way to get your students excited about current events and the news? This site (a new feature of the PBS NewsHour) provides daily (Monday ...more
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Are you looking for a new way to get your students excited about current events and the news? This site (a new feature of the PBS NewsHour) provides daily (Monday - Friday) video blogs. The blogs come complete with a video clip, summary, quotes, thinking questions, and more. (Don't miss the link to "How to Use this" with tips for downloading veido in advance of your class and how to use it). Video topics relate to current events but extend back into background that lead up to today's events. Some of the "extras" include transcripts, printables, and the ability to post comments. If you post a comment, you must provide your name, city, state, and email address. BE CERTAIN to check your school's Acceptable Use Policy and obtain parental permission before allowing students to comment on the video blogs.

Tip: rather than using your personal or work email, create a free Gmail account to use for memberships. If you plan to have students register individually, you may want to create your own Gmail account with up to 20 subaccounts for each group of students (by code name or number) within your classes. Here is a blog post that tells how to set up GMail subaccounts to use for any online membership service. The videos require Flash. You can get it from the TeachersFirst Toolbox page.

tag(s): news (261)

In the Classroom

Share these video blogs with your students on an interactive whiteboard or projector as you discuss current events and related issues. Share this link on your class web page as an option for weekly current events articles you require from students. Take advantage of the free resources (quotes, warm up questions, discussion questions, printables, and other resources). If you teach reading or are working to help learning support students build comprehension, you will find terrific passages for teaching comprehension, inferencing, summarizing, and more, all with meaningful news stories as the focus. If your school's Acceptable Use Policy allows, have students post their own comments to the video blogs. Another idea: have your students create their own wiki about current events in local and/or national news. Invite students to create their own multimedia packages using video clips and their own text to explain an issue and its history.
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How Collectors Coins are Made - U S Mint

Grades
1 to 8
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The US Mint offers two thorough tours about the process of creating collector coins and circulating coins. On the first page of this site, you can choose which tour you ...more
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The US Mint offers two thorough tours about the process of creating collector coins and circulating coins. On the first page of this site, you can choose which tour you would like to complete.

At the Collectors Coin tour, watch as coins are created and released into the collector population. Learn about the difference between collector coins and circulation coins. The US Mint tour takes guests virtually through how coins are made, the history of the Mint, the connection with the government, and how the coins are placed into circulation.

Both tours are thorough and the speaker is clear and to-the-point allowing for various age groups to benefit from watching the video. Choose from a video option or slide show format. This site requires Flash. You can get it from the TeachersFirst Toolbox page.

tag(s): coins (8), currency (20), money (193)

In the Classroom

Share the short videos (less than five minutes each) on an interactive whiteboard or projector during your money and measurement unit or as you study economics. Follow up with center time based on creating money and sorting as well as counting various types of money. Also include money from other countries for students to compare and contrast. Have older students summarize the video by using the classroom computer to create a flow chart about the money making process or a graphic organizer with the main points of the videos. This might be a terrific way to teach the study skill of graphic organizers! Students can present their documents on the interactive whiteboard or projectors. Include it on your teacher web page for students to access both in and out of class for enrichment or individual research.
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Consumer Reports Blogs - Consumer Reports

Grades
6 to 12
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Teens spend a lot of money. And they influence the spending of a lot more. Marketing companies know this and pitch their products mercilessly to the teen age demographic. With ...more
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Teens spend a lot of money. And they influence the spending of a lot more. Marketing companies know this and pitch their products mercilessly to the teen age demographic. With their high need for acceptance and affiliation, teens are also very susceptible to these marketing pitches. This site, part of the well-respected Consumer Reports site, offers commentary in several areas of interest to teens: electronics, cars, money, and shopping. Each topic area includes a full post and a blog. There are also links to news, forums, and videos. Offered without the hype, these reviews and observations may help teens cut through the marketing to learn to make intelligent consumer decisions, and learn to manage their money responsibly.

In order to comment on the blog, you must enter your name and email address. Rather than using your personal or work email, consider creating a Gmail account. If you plan to have students register individually, you may want to create your own Gmail account with up to 20 subaccounts for each group of students (by code name or number) within your classes. Here is a blog post that tells how to set up GMail subaccounts to use for any online membership service.

tag(s): advertising (33), business (58), safety (92)

In the Classroom

Family and consumer science, business, or "Life 101" classes might ask students to research common teen purchases using this site as a resource. Similarly, economics or psychology classes might consider the impact of marketing on purchasing, and how advertisers target and influence their audience. Follow up by having students generate their own blog entry on a product comparison they do as a project.
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25+ Tools for Accounting and Budgeting - Sean P. Aune

Grades
7 to 12
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This blog, created by Sean P. Aune, offers a collection of Web 2.0 tools which could be useful in business education, math, family and consumer science, or economics classes. Some ...more
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This blog, created by Sean P. Aune, offers a collection of Web 2.0 tools which could be useful in business education, math, family and consumer science, or economics classes. Some of the sites offer ways to save money, create a budget, analyze your expenses, find hidden fees, and more. The four main areas of the site include Business Accounting, Personal Accounting, Personal Budgeting, and Shared Accounting. Each link on the blog includes a brief description of the site.

Be certain to consider your school's Acceptable Use Policy before creating any STUDENT accounts on any of the tools. There are comments (students can both read or add comments), so be sure to supervise their navigating or do this as a class on an interactive whiteboard or projector. For tips on using Web 2.0 sites in your class visit the TeachersFirst Edge Tips. Some of these tools require Flash. You can get it from the TeachersFirst Toolbox page.

tag(s): business (58), counting (120), money (193)

In the Classroom

Use this site to help your students learn how to budget their money and expenses. Read through the descriptions of the 25+ tools and find out which ones may be useful in your subject area. Have students choose one of the tools to create a monthly budget a week or so prior to the start of the month. Have students keep calculations (using the site) throughout their "budgeted month" and see how well they can stick to their own budget. You may want to include this link on your class website so students can access the tools at home. You could also assign students to try more than one tool and compare them. Since students are used to using web tools for everything, challenge them to make the decision about which tool is best.
 
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Zunal WebQuest Maker - FREE - Zafer Unal, PhD

Grades
2 to 12
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Have you been pining to include pertinent webquests in your curriculum? This site allows you to view already created webquests and/or use their online tool to create your own webquest...more
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Have you been pining to include pertinent webquests in your curriculum? This site allows you to view already created webquests and/or use their online tool to create your own webquest without HTML code or web editor software. This site walks you through a tutorial on creating your own webquest for the parameters YOU want. The tutorial includes planning, building, and getting your webquest published. Best of all-- it is free. This site also includes ready-made webquests in nearly every subject area (math, art, music, social studies, science, etc.) submitted by others like you. There are webquests for all grade level. The webquests are free to use and many include reviews by other educators. An easy to follow webquest matrix is available, with all of the subjects and grade levels. You are also able to do a webquest search for a specific topic. Nearly all of the webquests are in English, but a few are in other languages. Note: the quality of webquests is completely determined by others using the site to create webquests, so PREVIEW before using any webquest in class.

tag(s): calories (9), colors (79), money (193), presidents (130), pyramids (29)

In the Classroom

Search the multitude of webquests that are "ready to go" at this site. If you are looking for a more personal touch, you can create your own webquest for each class, tailored to what you want to cover or want students to research. This site also provides a place to post a personal portfolio of your work (if you choose to include any student work, you must have written permission to do so from the student and his or her parent). You might also want students to create webquests as final products of group research projects. Be sure to provide a meaningful rubric for the essential features.

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Play the News Game - Impact Games

Grades
9 to 12
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In this current events activity, students (or all members of your class working together) choose current news events and assume character roles. After viewing the latest hot event in...more
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In this current events activity, students (or all members of your class working together) choose current news events and assume character roles. After viewing the latest hot event in the particular news item and reading some background, students (or your class) assume one of the characters' roles. They must make decisions, consult advisers, hone predictions, and make choices to steer tomorrow's news today. They can come back later to compare their predictions to what happened with the situation in the real news. Thus current events are no longer isolated factoids but become dynamic processes. News topics vary greatly and can include violence and other ugliness happening in the world today. Preview carefully before recommending a game to students, depending on the standards of your school community. Some topics include actual violence occurring in the world. Topics cover world news, U.S. politics, technology, and even entertainment. At one time, there are up to 20 news "games" going on. Players can see what other players have decided. Some games are closed; that is, their decisions are final. Members (your class as a whole?) also gain rank and opinion rating depending on how active they are on the website and how their opinions compare to those of the mainstream. As of this review, this site is still in "beta." This site requires Flash 9 or newer. Get it from the TeachersFirst Toolbox page..

To use many features of the site, you must create a membership (requires email). There are many "social" features within the site that make it a potential safety issue if all students are allowed to use it on their own. See ideas for handling these concerns below.

tag(s): news (261)

In the Classroom

Try this site as a regular part of your secondary discussions on current events or choose selected "games" that connect with your current curriculum topic. For example, explore stories from African nations as you study world cultures in Africa.

Classroom teachers will want to start by conducting this activity using a whole-class account (use your "extra" email account to create a single account, monitored by you). Use the game to facilitate discussion and build students' global citizenship by allowing them to make choices and see the results. Be sure to talk about the line between fantasy and reality: which parts of these games have actually happened and which are part of the "game" hypotheses. Include the link on your teacher web page for students to access both in and out of class if you believe they are ready to handle it on their own. Check your school policies on allowing students to participate in online decision making and sharing, and obtain written parent permission before individual students are allowed to log on. As an alternative for students who may not have permission, you can pose some of the same questions and provide newspaper and news magazine articles for background. But you know which tool your students will prefer!
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Showing Evidence: Analyzing and Evaluating Information - Intel Education

Grades
3 to 12
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Give your students the skills to analyze and evaluate information with Intel's free "Showing Evidence tool." "Showing Evidence" provides a visual framework to help students learn how...more
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Give your students the skills to analyze and evaluate information with Intel's free "Showing Evidence tool." "Showing Evidence" provides a visual framework to help students learn how to construct well-reasoned arguments and prove their case with credible evidence. Students are prompted to consider the quality of the evidence and the strength of the evidence to support their claim. When an argument is complicated, the components of the tool help students think through justifying a claim.

This web-based tool is accompanied by detailed lesson plans designed for elementary, middle, and high school students. A variety of subject areas and projects are ready to adapt for the classroom or implement as-is. Explore the project ideas, instructional strategies, assessment tips, and research to help you plan a project of your own. Registration is free and creates a teacher workspace in which to build the class project. The password-protected workspace is accessed through the internet where students log on with the teacher-created ID, team ID, and password. Students can access the project workspace from home or though other Internet access points such as the public library.

Be sure to disable your popup blocker, as the site needs to show popup windows during the project. This site requires Flash and Adobe Acrobat Reader. Get these tools from the TeachersFirst Toolbox page..

tag(s): debate (41), folktales (65), shakespeare (131), thinking skills (17)

In the Classroom

Teachers can use the comprehensive tutorial to learn the features of the tool and use the workspace to practice with the tool. Take advantage of the detailed unit plans that provide usable handouts and student work samples. Or just browse through several shorter project descriptions for project ideas that suit your classroom.

Make a shortcut to this site on your desktop and student computer desktops for easy access. Use the "Showing Evidence "tool to explore themes such as why do we explore, what happens next, is everything we read true, and what is freedom? Have student teams stage debates using their visual diagrams to show their thinking processes to the class using an interactive whiteboard or projector.
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ZIPskinny - ZIPskinny

Grades
6 to 12
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A useful little site for research or idle curiosity, this site offers some basic demographic data about the communities that make up each U.S. ZIP code. The ZIP code, first ...more
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A useful little site for research or idle curiosity, this site offers some basic demographic data about the communities that make up each U.S. ZIP code. The ZIP code, first developed in 1963 to assist the U.S. Postal Service with automated mail delivery, has become a powerful demographic symbol and is frequently used by researchers to compare U.S. communities. This site, which ties its data to information gathered in the 2000 census, offers no commentary--just the facts ma'am--and includes statistics on education, income, population, race, gender, and marital status. There is a utility for comparing any ZIP code with up to 20 other ZIP codes. Students may be interested in the specific data provided for each public school within a given ZIP code. Our reviewers did notice that some ZIP codes are not included at this time. Serious researchers are cautioned, the data comes from the 2000 census, and may be outdated. This historical census data may provide a good comparison with other, more recent years or for students to make predictions for an upcoming census based on past trends. There is a lot of advertising on the site, although the majority of it is in the form of text links rather than annoying pictures or dancing silhouettes.

tag(s): census (19), demographics (19)

In the Classroom

Teachers or students seeking some basic demographic data about their own town or city, or wishing to compare it with another location, will find this site useful. Civics, government, or economics lessons could be enriched with local data which might be compared to the more general information offered by textbooks in answer to the question "How do we compare to this?" Math teachers and reading teachers who teach graphical data analysis might get some mileage out of using the graphs and tables from their own towns or communities for computations rather than using generic information from a textbook. Project the graphs on a whiteboard and have students manipulate to explain the meaning of changes in the visuals. Think of the higher level thinking questions you could generate during a political year! Of course, the terminally curious can probably waste a good hour or two just noodling with the data.

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Seeing Reason: Mindful Mapping of Cause and Effect - Intel Education

Grades
2 to 12
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Develop your students' thinking skills with Intel's free "Seeing Reason" tool to analyze cause-and-effect relationships in complex systems. Students can use the Seeing Reason Tool to...more
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Develop your students' thinking skills with Intel's free "Seeing Reason" tool to analyze cause-and-effect relationships in complex systems. Students can use the Seeing Reason Tool to develop visual maps of the factors and relationships in cause-and-effect investigations. Student-created causal maps make thinking visible and promote collaboration as they work together to refine their understanding. Teachers can use Seeing Reason as a monitoring and observation tool, since the maps are visual representations of student understanding.

This web-based tool is accompanied by detailed lesson plans for different grade levels and subject areas. It provides a complete project, ready to adapt for the classroom or implement as-is. Explore the project ideas, instructional strategies, assessment tips, and research to help you plan a project of your own. Registration is free and creates a teacher workspace in which to build the class project. The password-protected workspace is accessed through the internet where students log on with the teacher-created ID, team ID, and password.

Be sure to disable your popup blocker, as the site needs to show popup windows during the project. This site requires Flash and Adobe Acrobat Reader. Get these tools from the TeachersFirst Toolbox page..

tag(s): thinking skills (17)

In the Classroom

Help students analyze why a science experiment failed, why an animal became extinct, why a literary character acts as he does, or the factors leading to an economic or historical event. Teachers can use the comprehensive tutorial to learn the features of the tool and use the workspace to practice with the tool. Take advantage of the experiences of other teachers in eight detailed unit plans that provide usable handouts and student work samples. Or just browse through several shorter project descriptions for project ideas that suit your classroom.

Make a shortcut to this site on your desktop and student computer desktops for easy access or simply add it to the Favorites on your teacher web page for access from there.

Use the Seeing Reason tool to explore themes such as habitat conflict, neighborhood diversity, and decision-making with your students. Have student teams show and explain their maps to the whole class using an interactive whiteboard or projector. Students can access the project workspace from home or through other Internet access points such as the public library.
  This resource requires Adobe Flash and PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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Getting Credit - Federal Trade Commission

Grades
8 to 12
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This site explores the ramifications of using credit cards by showing how much they cost users. Students do calculations to figure out the amount of money they would lose by ...more
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This site explores the ramifications of using credit cards by showing how much they cost users. Students do calculations to figure out the amount of money they would lose by charging. With many young students holding credit cards today, it's never too early to start educating them about the power of plastic! Other topics covered include scams, losing a purse or wallet, identity theft, and credit fraud. A helpful glossary explains the often confusing vocabulary found on credit card statements and user agreements. Some of the activities at this website are Java enabled. You can get it from the TeachersFirst Toolbox page..

In the Classroom

Use this as part of a unit on managing finances or applied math, or when studying computer hacking and identity theft. Have students work with a partner to create a computer spreadsheet, including formulas, to compare the total price of certain purchases using credit and cash, including various interest rates, for specific items they select out of the newspaper or online ads.
 This resource requires PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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Math in Daily Life - Annenberg Media

Grades
8 to 12
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This authentic website connects math to everyday life. The website offers informational text and numerous interactive "real life" math investigations. Topics include Playing to...more
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This authentic website connects math to everyday life. The website offers informational text and numerous interactive "real life" math investigations. Topics include Playing to Win, Savings and Credit, Population Growth, Home Decorating, Cooking by Numbers, The Universal Language, & Related References . Some examples of the interactive investigations include determining whether it is smarter to buy or lease a car and how much you will save for retirement (based on how much you invest each month and how many years the money remains in the bank).

tag(s): calculators (41), money (193), statistics (122)

In the Classroom

What a fabulous website to use in any economics, finance, or upper-level math class. Use your interactive whiteboard or projector to share the website and activities. Then allow your students to explore independently and fill out the interactive investigations for their own futures.

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Spirit of the Season - NY Times

Grades
5 to 12
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This site is a collection of seasonally-appropriate lesson plans for winter and the holiday season, including philanthropy, winter sports, and weather. In addition to lesson plans,...more
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This site is a collection of seasonally-appropriate lesson plans for winter and the holiday season, including philanthropy, winter sports, and weather. In addition to lesson plans, there are timely crossword puzzles and questions and answers about winter weather.

tag(s): christmas (64), holidays (147), sports (96), weather (188)

In the Classroom

Use this to find a curriculum-appropriate way to include the holidays in your plans. It's a great place to give students info about symbols of international religions, for example, or to explain the history and applications of volunteerism and giving. If you advise a service club, there are fresh ideas here, as well.

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Math Online Clips - ThinkPort

Grades
6 to 12
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This wonderful site has an extensive list of free video clips about various mathematical and economics topics. Topics include investing, budgeting, credit, averaging, coordinates, home...more
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This wonderful site has an extensive list of free video clips about various mathematical and economics topics. Topics include investing, budgeting, credit, averaging, coordinates, home ownership, international currency, everyday math for parents, and many other topics. Users can open them with Windows Media or Real Player (the listings tell which one is needed). Get them from the TeachersFirst Toolbox page.. This site MUST have a high speed connection! It can be slow to load during "peak" times (11 a.m. to 2 pm Eastern time in the U.S.). Be patient while clips download, even on a peppy network. While the videos are downloading, you may not think anything is happening. TURN OFF your pop-up blocker (including the ones built into the Google and Yahoo toolbars) so you can see the video pop-up windows.

tag(s): coordinates (32), money (193)

In the Classroom

Preview the video clips before recommending them to students or using in class, since the quality of video and audio varies significantly. Downloaded files will open much faster, too! Remember to turn up speakers for group viewing or provide headphones at your center. Share this link with parents on your web page or in your newsletter to encourage math practice at home.
 This resource requires Adobe Flash.

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