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Of the People: Art and History of the White House - Discovery Education

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6 to 12
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Go behind the scenes for an in-depth video discussion of the art and history of the White House with White House Curator William Allman. The actual discussion begins after the ...more
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Go behind the scenes for an in-depth video discussion of the art and history of the White House with White House Curator William Allman. The actual discussion begins after the 14-minute mark on the video with an interview led by a high school student. Questions include those submitted by students all over the country.

tag(s): art history (70), presidents (131), white house (14)

In the Classroom

Before viewing this video, challenge students to brainstorm what a curator's job is and what kind of artifacts they might find in the White House. After viewing, have students create a simple infographic of important White House artifacts sharing their findings using Venngage, reviewed here. Ask students to curate their own collection of items such as things found in their room at home, a collection of items from your school, or a collection of artifacts from your hometown. Create a book featuring these items using Ourboox, reviewed here. Ourboox creates beautiful page-flipping digital books in minutes, and you can embed video, music, animation, games, maps and more.

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OK2Ask: Great Ideas for Tech Infused Lessons - TeachersFirst

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K to 12
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This recording of an OK2Ask online professional development session from November 2016, opens in Adobe Connect. Explore the teacher-friendly features of TeachersFirst to help you save...more
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This recording of an OK2Ask online professional development session from November 2016, opens in Adobe Connect. Explore the teacher-friendly features of TeachersFirst to help you save time in developing technology infused lessons. Participants will learn new strategies to incorporate the tools of the web successfully into any classroom. As a result of this session and through individual follow-up, teachers will: (1) Locate resources within TeachersFirst to provide real-world learning experiences for their students; (2) Locate and evaluate effective, web-based tools and resources in support of teaching and learning, both for themselves and for their students; (3) Evaluate TeachersFirst membership features applicable to their individual technology expertise and teaching situation; (4) Find solutions to individual questions or practical problems of their teaching situation by exploring TeachersFirst and/or asking live questions during the session; and (5) Plan to use the features of TeachersFirst's value-added reviews to plan technology infused lessons. This session is for teachers at ALL technology comfort levels.

In the Classroom

The archive of this teacher-friendly, hands-on webinar will empower and inspire you to use technology in the classroom and for professional productivity. As appropriate, specific classroom examples and ideas have been shared. View the session with a few of your teaching colleagues to find and share new ideas. Find additional information and links to tools at the session resource page. Learn more about OK2Ask and upcoming sessions here.
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The Volunteers: Americans Join World War I, 1914-1919 Curriculum - AFS Intercultural Program

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7 to 12
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The Volunteers: Americans Join World War I, 1914-1919 curriculum has 22 lesson plans, and examines the volunteer service of Americans, primarily during the period of U.S. neutrality...more
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The Volunteers: Americans Join World War I, 1914-1919 curriculum has 22 lesson plans, and examines the volunteer service of Americans, primarily during the period of U.S. neutrality before entering the war. Each lesson has extensive resources and activities, including national and global standards, objectives, background essay, essential questions, instructions, activator or introduction, extension activity, assessments, teaching tips, student materials and handouts, plus links to maps, articles, websites, books, and videos. Lessons are primary-source-intensive with a wide variety of text types, promoting historical analysis skills and construction of knowledge. The topics include discussions of why people volunteer, what are humanitarian organizations, and what were women's roles in volunteer service in World War I as related to women's fight for equality. Also find how humanitarian relief efforts get organized and sustained and how young volunteers are involved in world affairs, historically and today, to explore. The National World War I Museum and Memorial is a partner to AFS Intercultural Program and helped develop this resource.

tag(s): europe (75), maps (287), primary sources (86), womens suffrage (26), world war 1 (54)

In the Classroom

Download individual lessons or the whole curriculum to be used offline. Engage students in an underlying theme or question, helping to bridge between past and present. Lessons are extensive and easy to adapt and use. Use handouts with a whole class, small group collaboration, or individual work. Be sure to download the Teacher Toolkit to take advantage of the extensive lesson resources. Use the Tips in each lesson to enhance your teaching experience, adapt activities to the global classroom, and find more activities and homework ideas. Visit the link to the Museum's companion exhibit, here, for more resources.

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The Stock Market Game - Securities Industry and Financial Markets Assoc Foundation

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4 to 12
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Using hands-on lessons, students work in teams to learn the basics of investing, create $100,000 portfolios, manage an investment portfolio in a real-world scenario of a dynamic marketplace,...more
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Using hands-on lessons, students work in teams to learn the basics of investing, create $100,000 portfolios, manage an investment portfolio in a real-world scenario of a dynamic marketplace, learn other economic concepts, and compete against teams across the globe while fostering teamwork and decision-making skills. Created in 1977 by the Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association Foundation, The Stock Market Game (SMG) is an online simulation game for teaching students about the global capital markets and stock market. Teachers must register for their school and students and then will receive essential information on program requirements and important dates. Adults are welcome to play after registering. SMG is coordinated locally by non-profit partners dedicated to youth financial literacy who volunteer when help is needed. Each year 600,000 students participate around the world in exciting collaborative activities.

tag(s): business (58), game based learning (103), investing (10), money (193), stock market (13)

In the Classroom

Participants who register as "Teachers with Classes" receive extensive teacher support, including a searchable library of standards, curriculum materials, and assessments. While providing real-world practice, SMG engages students in the core academic subjects, such as math, English, and economics. Lesson plans include Teacher Background and materials to implement the lesson with students. Find more information by perusing additional publications, links, and other resources. Contact a local SMG Coordinator for additional assistance. Use the game in individual classes, school-wide, in after school clubs, or with home-schoolers. Families can play at home together or collaborate with others. Additional benefits include higher math and financial literacy scores on tests by students who play SMG. Also, teachers report that the program even taught them about financial planning, research, and investing wisely.

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iCivics, Win the White House - iCivics

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4 to 12
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Make the presidential election process personal. Run for U.S. president by playing this free interactive online game which is best played on a computer using most current browsers....more
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Make the presidential election process personal. Run for U.S. president by playing this free interactive online game which is best played on a computer using most current browsers. In this lively, colorful simulation, students will experience being part of a campaign, including creating a candidate avatar, selecting either Democratic or Republican issues, participating in debates and developing a media campaign. Choose your level to start: elementary, middle, or high school and complete the easy-to-follow tasks which do involve some reading, especially the debates section. The "Campaign Manager" will lead you through the process ending with your final probability of winning. Loading the game may take a few moments. Sound begins immediately, but may be toggled off. Online assistance is available by clicking the Help button in the top right corner at each step of the game. Also, the Back button in the top left corner allows easy do-overs of sections. Students may play without registering, but will access more content, compete with others and earn badges after logging in. You can have separate accounts for students and teachers, but must have email addresses. An automatic username is generated when registering. The easy to use Extension Pack for Teachers provides more activities and assessments. Registered teachers can message students and create classes to give students a virtual class code to join without needing an email. If students register, they can check their My iCivics accounts to see points and message members of their groups which can be controlled by the teacher.

tag(s): elections (75), presidents (131)

In the Classroom

Start out using this site with your projector or interactive whiteboard with the whole class. Walk through the beginning of the game and demonstrate the built-in help which is useful for students who might need additional guidance. Have individuals play or create small group teams of campaign staff to guide the candidates. Students or groups may play multiple times. After registering, the site will save games and students can send messages. Use the Achievements badges and points for student assessments. Have students research the debate topics and compare the different aspects of the game to real-life examples in the news. An easy to use Extension Pack for Teachers provides more activities and assessments.
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Election 2016: Our Teaching and Learning Homepage - The Learning Network/New York Times

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5 to 12
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Select from the best and most "evergreen" resources for teaching about the 2016 election at this homepage for The Learning Network. Choose from a complete four-part election unit or...more
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Select from the best and most "evergreen" resources for teaching about the 2016 election at this homepage for The Learning Network. Choose from a complete four-part election unit or smaller lesson plans covering topics including comparing candidates and understanding primaries and caucuses. Other portions of the site include classroom discussion questions, articles, and free resources from around the web.

tag(s): elections (75), electoral college (16), politics (99)

In the Classroom

Take advantage of the many free activities and resources found on this site well after election 2016. Modify any of the materials to teach about local and state elections or adapt questions to fit any current topic. Have cooperative learning groups create podcasts discussing the biggest issues surrounding an election. Use a site such as podOmatic, reviewed here.
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Television Commercial Analysis Chart - The Learning Network/New York Times

Grades
6 to 12
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This PDF provides a very easy to use chart for providing information found in political candidate's tv commercials. Fill in the blanks to describe what the commercial shows, what you...more
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This PDF provides a very easy to use chart for providing information found in political candidate's tv commercials. Fill in the blanks to describe what the commercial shows, what you hear, and what you think the producers want you to get from the commercial. The final box provides an opportunity to discuss your thoughts on the effectiveness of the ad.

tag(s): advertising (33), elections (75), presidents (131)

In the Classroom

Print and use this form to include with your election unit as you analzye the candidates and their pitch for votes. This form is pretty basic, use it as a starting point for a more in-depth look at political commercials. Ask students to list ideas to include on your form. Include information from your analysis of political commercials and have students make a multimedia presentation using one of the many TeachersFirst Edge tools'?reviewed here.''?
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Political Party Quiz - PBS

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8 to 12
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Where do you fit? Take this 11 question quiz to find how your views fit on the political spectrum. When finished, use options to view your beliefs against others of ...more
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Where do you fit? Take this 11 question quiz to find how your views fit on the political spectrum. When finished, use options to view your beliefs against others of similar age, gender, and religion.

tag(s): elections (75), polls and surveys (48), quiz (85)

In the Classroom

Share the Political Party Quiz with students to complete on their own as part of any election unit. Have them compare their responses to the platform of leading candidates. Ask students to write an editorial discussing an issue that is important to them, or have students write a letter to one of the candidates discussing an issue of importance.

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Does Your Vote Count? The Electoral College Explained - Christina Greer

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4 to 12
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Many students (and adults) don't fully understand the role of the Electoral College in presidential elections. Does Your Vote Count? is a YouTube video providing a clear explanation...more
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Many students (and adults) don't fully understand the role of the Electoral College in presidential elections. Does Your Vote Count? is a YouTube video providing a clear explanation of the Electoral College and how it works as part of the election process. If your district blocks YouTube, then they may not be viewable. You could always view the videos at home and bring them to class "on a stick" to share. Use a tool such as KeepVid, reviewed here, to download the videos from YouTube.

tag(s): elections (75), electoral college (16)

In the Classroom

Share this video on an interactive whiteboard (or projector) as part of any election unit. Have students research the number of electoral votes available in your state. Use an online tool such as Interactive Two Circle Venn Diagram, reviewed here, to compare the democratic process in the United States to that of another country. Have students create maps using Animaps, reviewed here, to identify the number of electoral votes available in each state. Students can add text, images, and additional information such as how the electoral votes were cast in previous elections.

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Electoral College - The Lou Frey Institute of Politics & Government

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5 to 12
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This 5 minute YouTube video explores one of the misunderstood elements of presidential elections - the Electoral College. Using easy to understand language, the moderator explains the...more
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This 5 minute YouTube video explores one of the misunderstood elements of presidential elections - the Electoral College. Using easy to understand language, the moderator explains the role of the Electoral College and how the popular vote translates into votes in the Electoral College. If your district blocks YouTube, then they may not be viewable. You could always view the videos at home and bring them to class "on a stick" to share. Use a tool such as KeepVid reviewed here to download the videos from YouTube.

tag(s): elections (75), electoral college (16)

In the Classroom

View this video together on an interactive whiteboard to illustrate the impact of the Electoral College voting on the election of the US President, both today and in the past. Alternatively, embed it in your class web page for the duration of your elections unit. Have students create their own "in plain English" video about a topic in government and share them using a tool such as SchoolTube, reviewed here. Use an online tool such as Interactive Two Circle Venn Diagram (reviewed here) to compare and contrast differences between the popular vote and Electoral College votes. Add questions to this video for students to explore further using a tool such as EdPuzzle (reviewed here).

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Civil Rights Movement Interactive Map - NewseumEd

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8 to 12
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This interactive map includes links to newspaper coverage of civil rights stories from around the nation beginning with 1954 through 1965. Choose any year to view several front pages...more
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This interactive map includes links to newspaper coverage of civil rights stories from around the nation beginning with 1954 through 1965. Choose any year to view several front pages with coverage of major events. Read each front page by clicking "view larger image". For additional information on similar topics, scroll to the bottom of the page to find links to more artifacts.

tag(s): black history (59), civil rights (117), newspapers (94)

In the Classroom

Share a link to this site on your class website and allow students to explore on their own. Discuss their findings and interpretations of media coverage of civil rights events in class. Use an online tool such as Interactive Two Circle Venn Diagram, reviewed here, to compare and contrast media coverage in two different cities. Ask students to investigate newspapers from additional locations, then create a presentation sharing their findings using Prezi, reviewed here.

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Making a Change: The First Amendment and the Civil Rights Movement - NewseumED

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8 to 12
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Explore how the First Amendment influenced the Civil Rights Movement through this collection of resources from Newseum. The collection includes three teaching units with topics of Historical...more
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Explore how the First Amendment influenced the Civil Rights Movement through this collection of resources from Newseum. The collection includes three teaching units with topics of Historical Connections, Media Literacy, and Civics & Citizenship. In addition, an interactive timeline beginning in 1791 demonstrates the Civil Rights journey. A Google Civil Rights map includes links to important American newspapers and their coverage of civil rights events and leaders. Be sure to sign up for your free NewseumED account for complete access to all materials.

tag(s): black history (59), civil rights (117), constitution (79), journalism (46), newspapers (94)

In the Classroom

Use any or all of the units and interactives with any Civil Rights lessons; this site isn't just for Black History Month! Share with journalism students as they explore the role of the press in shaping and telling the story of a nation. Have small groups or pairs of students make a multimedia presentation exploring the First Amendment and the role of the press using a tool such as Ignite, reviewed here. With the web-based Ignite, you can include text, images, and video. The iPad app allows you to add audio, too. To illustrate different press coverage around the nation, have students create maps using Animaps, reviewed here; students can add text, images, and location stops!
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'Watergate' Video Lesson - NewseumED

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8 to 12
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This NewseumED video lesson explores the role of the press in the 1970's Watergate scandal. Activities include watching a video and completing a comprehension worksheet. In addition...more
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This NewseumED video lesson explores the role of the press in the 1970's Watergate scandal. Activities include watching a video and completing a comprehension worksheet. In addition to the 30-minute lesson, several ideas for extension activities are included. To find related activities on Newseum, scroll to the bottom of the page for additional ideas. Sign up for NewseumED (FREE) to access all materials.

tag(s): 1970s (12), journalism (46), presidents (131)

In the Classroom

Include this site with any lessons on the power of the press, the 70's, or presidents. This site is perfect for a flipped classroom activity, have students view the video and complete the worksheet questions at home before going in-depth with the material at school. Have students create a timeline of events related to Watergate (with music, photos, videos, and more) using Capzles, reviewed here. Allow students to be journalists and create their own newspaper using a site such as Zinepal, reviewed here. Click "Start with a blank e-Book."
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'The Press and the Civil Rights Movement' Video Lesson - NewseumED

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8 to 12
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'The Press and the Civil Rights Movement' video portrays the importance to democracy of having a free press. Using original clips from different television news shows, newspapers, and...more
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'The Press and the Civil Rights Movement' video portrays the importance to democracy of having a free press. Using original clips from different television news shows, newspapers, and photographs (all primary sources) of the 1950s and 1960s the video delves into the idea that the civil rights movement may not have gotten very far without a free press. Find a step by step lesson plan including before and after viewing discussion questions, a viewing guide with short answer questions, and a handout with the names of the major figures in the video and what they had to do with the civil rights movement. View the video before showing to students to deem whether the strong language, gestures, and violence may be inappropriate for your class.

tag(s): civil rights (117), constitution (79), freedom of speech (10), martin luther king (37)

In the Classroom

Using the Activity lesson plan/viewing guide, have the before viewing discussion with your class. Consider giving all students a chance to voice their opinions (even the shyest and quiet ones) by using a backchannel tool like 81 Dash, reviewed here. Then, show the video to the whole class, or "flip" the class and have them watch it at home. Either way, the viewing guide questions could be inserted into the video using a tool such as playposit (formerly known as eduCanon), reviewed here. After the video, use the discussion questions and 81 Dash again. Next, have students (or small groups) choose one of the extension activities to complete and share with classmates.

The reviewers at TeachersFirst have some suggestions for tools to use for those final projects: For items 1-4 make a chart using a tool such as Creately, reviewed here, or Draw.io, reviewed here. For managing a project like item 5 use Google Keep, reviewed here, Workflowy, reviewed here, or Todoist, reviewed here. For items 6 & 7, biography type projects, use Fakebook, reviewed here, and for item 8, make a collage, use Fotojet, reviewed here.
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Civil Rights Timeline - NewseumED

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8 to 12
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This interactive timeline from NewseumED uses primary source news articles and photographs, with explanations, about the events covering American's civil rights from the ratification...more
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This interactive timeline from NewseumED uses primary source news articles and photographs, with explanations, about the events covering American's civil rights from the ratification of the Bill of Rights in 1791 through Alexander vs. Holmes in 1969. Use the slider at the top to see all of the articles. Of course there are the usual articles about the assassinations of President Kennedy, Malcolm X, and Martin Luther King, the March on Washington, The Formation of the Black Panther Party, and Letter from Birmingham Jail, 1963. However, there are many other interesting articles that are pertinent to today's news, too many to list here. Some of these are: Poor People's Campaign 1968, Riots Spur National Study 1967, Orangeburg Massacre 1968, Watts Riot and the Bloody Sunday March 1965, Freedom Summer Campaign for Voter Registration (and education for black children) 1964, Baptist Church Bombing 1963, and The Children's Crusade 1963. To access this timeline you must register for a FREE NeweumED account.

tag(s): black history (59), civil rights (117), constitution (79), martin luther king (37)

In the Classroom

Civil Rights is about more than a movement that took place forty plus years ago. Americans have fought for their civil rights going back to the late 1700s. We are still fighting for them today. Review the timeline with a projector and the whole class. Then suggest to students that some of the articles have parallel situations going on today. Have them choose an article and research the situation from back in the 1960s and then compare it to a similar situation that is ongoing in the 21st century. Challenge students to present their findings to classmates by creating a simple infographic using Easel.ly, reviewed here, or an online poster creator using Checkthis, reviewed here.

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Freedom in the Balance - NewseumED

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8 to 12
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Freedom in the Balance is a free resource from NewseumED that uses real-life scenarios and historical and contemporary case studies to examine individual rights vs. national security....more
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Freedom in the Balance is a free resource from NewseumED that uses real-life scenarios and historical and contemporary case studies to examine individual rights vs. national security. Click on More Details and use the drop-down menu for Explore the Questions. That is where you will find the essential questions, and the What Happened Then? and What's Happening Now? case studies. Click the button for the interactive Take Our Quiz to find out where you stand on freedom and whom you would "click with" in history. For the quiz, you will read ten scenarios, based on real-life examples, and select one of four responses about how you feel about the issue presented. Then get your profile results and see how you rank among all quiz takers. There is also an option to explore a case study based on the man who landed a gyrocopter on the Capitol lawn to bring attention to the need for campaign finance reform.

tag(s): civil rights (117), constitution (79), freedom of speech (10)

In the Classroom

Review the First Amendment and the rights it provides to the citizens of the United States. Consider showing '45 Words' Video Lesson, reviewed here, for this. Then have students take the interactive quiz to find out their freedom profile. Pair together or make small groups of students who received different results from taking the quiz. Have the small groups or pairs each take a different essential question and read about the What Happened Then and What's Happening Now? case studies. Have students create a simple infographic using Piktochart, reviewed here, to present what they learned to their classmates. Next, have them analyze the scenarios from the quiz and the possible responses to see which responses issued their profile/results. Ask students to apply the knowledge gained from this investigation to create a scenario and responses for the Explore the Case Study about the man who landed a gyrocopter on the Capitol lawn to bring attention to the need for campaign finance reform.
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'45 Words' Video Lesson - NewseumED

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8 to 12
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Brought to you by NewseumED, this video is a perfect fit to introduce any unit on the First Amendment and its freedoms. Find a comprehensive lesson plan, watch the video ...more
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Brought to you by NewseumED, this video is a perfect fit to introduce any unit on the First Amendment and its freedoms. Find a comprehensive lesson plan, watch the video through the NewseumEd site, and download documents in either PDF or Word formats. The documents include a list of historical figures and their involvement with the issues from the period, and a viewing guide worksheet for students to fill in. All of the actors' words, in the video, are direct quotations taken from primary sources. Since the video focuses on the origins of the freedom of the press, it would make a fascinating intro to a media literacy unit, too.

tag(s): civil rights (117), constitution (79), media literacy (58), video (254)

In the Classroom

Whether studying the First Amendment or media literacy, upload this video to a tool such as EDPuzzle, reviewed here, to edit the video to show only portions you select, or to pause the video automatically and add questions for students to answer, and/or add your verbal comments. Some of the Discuss questions would be appropriate to insert after viewing parts of the video. Break students into small groups after the video and assign them different Discuss questions for reflection and investigation. Challenge small groups to create a presentation to share what they learned using a tool like Zoho Show (similar to Powerpoint, but easier and free), reviewed here. After watching and discussing the video, extend either a media literacy unit or a civics/government unit. Do this by asking students to view news articles in our present political situation i.e. election time, civil rights discussed, etc.. Then have them compare how the news media during the late 1700s would have handled issues of today, and how politicians of the Federalist party would have reacted to our issues today. Alternatively, have students create a simple infographic comparing the problems in the news of then and now. Use a tool such as Piktochart, reviewed here.
 This resource requires PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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Believe It or Not? - NewseumED

Grades
8 to 12
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Use the lessons, discussion questions, and news articles provide by NewseumEd to help young adults understand what media literacy is and to tell the difference between good and bad...more
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Use the lessons, discussion questions, and news articles provide by NewseumEd to help young adults understand what media literacy is and to tell the difference between good and bad information. Though the lessons seem to center around a visit to Newseum and their galleries, there is a lot to be learned just by examining and discussing the materials presented here. There are discussion questions, media issues to think about, suggested in-class activities, and worksheets. Find a Unit plan with lessons that are standards aligned and Common Core compatible. The Unit plan and worksheets are available in both PDF and Word document formats.

tag(s): media literacy (58), news (261)

In the Classroom

Take advantage of the free lessons, discussion questions, sample articles, and worksheets offered for use in your classroom. Divide students into small groups and assign different discussion questions and activities to each group. Challenge the small groups to create a slide presentation using Swipe, reviewed here, demonstrating information learned. With Swipe students can add videos, images and documents making them all interactive.
 This resource requires PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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You Can't Say That in School?! - NewseumED

Grades
8 to 12
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Use the lessons, discussion questions, and court cases provided by NewseumEd to help young adults learn about their five freedoms according to the First Amendment and what limitations...more
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Use the lessons, discussion questions, and court cases provided by NewseumEd to help young adults learn about their five freedoms according to the First Amendment and what limitations there might be. Students should be able to understand how these rights apply to their daily life once you have gone through these materials. Though the lessons seem to center around a visit to Newseum and their galleries, there is a lot to be learned just by examining and discussing the materials presented here. This unit is standards aligned and Common Core compatible. It is comprehensive and includes printable discussion guides, as well as extension activities.

tag(s): civil rights (117), constitution (79), freedom of speech (10)

In the Classroom

Download and carefully read through the Unit - You Can't Say That in School?! Select activities and discussion questions that you think will pique student interest. Take advantage of the suggestions made in the ready-made lesson of the Unit - You Can't Say That in School. Break students into small groups, by interest, to investigate the results of each of the Allowed or Not Allowed questions. Have students present their findings to the class using a simple infographic tool such as Piktochart, reviewed here.
 This resource requires PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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Civil War - Tale of Two Titans - Norwich University's Master of Arts in Military History Program

Grades
5 to 12
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Discover this interesting infographic comparing two leaders of the Civil War. Learn about Ulysses S. Grant and Robert E. Lee with comparisons of both their personal life and careers....more
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Discover this interesting infographic comparing two leaders of the Civil War. Learn about Ulysses S. Grant and Robert E. Lee with comparisons of both their personal life and careers. Information also includes famous battles during the Civil War and their careers following the war. Scroll past the infographic to view sources used and additional information.

tag(s): 1800s (44), civil war (145)

In the Classroom

Use the provided embed code to insert the infographic into your class website. Have students use this as a starting point for further research on Civil War leaders. Use an online tool such as Interactive Two Circle Venn Diagram, reviewed here, to compare and contrast information. Have students create Civil War timelines (with music, photos, videos, and more) using Capzles, reviewed here.

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