TeachersFirst - Featured Sites: Week of Jan 29, 2017

Here are this week's features. Clicking the tags in the description area of each listing will present a list of other resources with this topic. | Click here to return to the Featured Sites Archive

 

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Civil Rights Movement Interactive Map - NewseumEd

Grades
8 to 12
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This interactive map includes links to newspaper coverage of civil rights stories from around the nation beginning with 1954 through 1965. Choose any year to view several front pages...more
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This interactive map includes links to newspaper coverage of civil rights stories from around the nation beginning with 1954 through 1965. Choose any year to view several front pages with coverage of major events. Read each front page by clicking "view larger image". For additional information on similar topics, scroll to the bottom of the page to find links to more artifacts.

tag(s): black history (61), civil rights (122), newspapers (97)

In the Classroom

Share a link to this site on your class website and allow students to explore on their own. Discuss their findings and interpretations of media coverage of civil rights events in class. Use an online tool such as Interactive Two Circle Venn Diagram, reviewed here, to compare and contrast media coverage in two different cities. Ask students to investigate newspapers from additional locations, then create a presentation sharing their findings using Prezi, reviewed here.

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Office Mix - Microsoft

Grades
K to 12
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Take your standard PowerPoint to new interactive levels with this tool! Add video or audio, write on your slides as you present, and even insert quizzes and polls. Take the ...more
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Take your standard PowerPoint to new interactive levels with this tool! Add video or audio, write on your slides as you present, and even insert quizzes and polls. Take the limited PowerPoint presentation and "mix" it with the best parts of a live lecture in one tool. Each PowerPoint slide contains additional tabs for the added information. Since each slide is independent and contains the video, audio, or screencast, those slides can still be reordered by dragging them into the correct order. Insert information from Khan Academy or CK-12 as well. Easily control the number of attempts with quizzes, provide hints, add a timer, randomize the questions, or give feedback. Analytics are provided as well to see student interaction with the material. Each Mix lives online and can be accessed with any browser. Give the link to students for access. Mixes cannot be saved on your computer. Find ways to use with popular Learning Management Systems (LMS) like Moodle, Blackboard, Canvas, and more with these tutorials found here. Note: Mixes can only be created with a PC and PowerPoint 2013 (not free).

tag(s): images (274), quiz (88), quizzes (100), sound (105), video (276)

In the Classroom

Use this tool to create Flipped Lessons, moving some material like knowledge activities, as a pre-class activity. Office Mix is a valuable tool when you will be out of the classroom. Your plans are ready to go! Absent students can easily follow the content from the day. Differentiate for your classroom by creating a Mix that can be used for students to review as needed. Students who need it can review while others can focus on the material that they need. Use this tool wherever a PowerPoint with more detailed explanations are needed. Club advisors can use this tool to show 'how to' information for extracurriculars or field trips. Use this tool to show how to complete forms correctly, saving time and frustration! Students can create a Mix to share information researched for any class presentation at the end of a unit such as Black History Month, the Civil War, etc.

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Closr (Beta) - Closr.it

Grades
K to 12
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Engage your audience with zoomable images using Closr. Create an account and upload an image to begin. Add "Spots" and descriptions of any location on the image. Use the zoom ...more
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Engage your audience with zoomable images using Closr. Create an account and upload an image to begin. Add "Spots" and descriptions of any location on the image. Use the zoom feature to zoom in on any area on the image. Highlight and describe information. When finished, share using the embed code, URL, or social media links. Free plans include creating up to 5 canvases. Currently this site is also available as an iOS App.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): images (274)

In the Classroom

Share Closr with your school's art teacher as an excellent way to highlight and feature details on artwork. History and science teachers can use Closr to zoom in on parts of the microscope, cells, historic buildings, battles, and more. Have students upload an image to demonstrate different parts of plants, landforms, or shapes found in images. Challenge students to upload images of a certain aspect of the Civil Rights Movement such as riots, laws implemented to remove segregation, lynchings, or different committees, assemblies, and leagues established to help ensure black American citizens have equal rights.

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History in Motion - Paul Cashman

Grades
6 to 12
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Design an animated timeline that will move simultaneously with a map. Include descriptions of events, display images, and embed videos along each point of the timeline. Register to...more
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Design an animated timeline that will move simultaneously with a map. Include descriptions of events, display images, and embed videos along each point of the timeline. Register to get started. Be sure to watch the introductory video before starting a project/scenario. Start by selecting the beginning and ending points. After that, fill in the events, images, and videos. Editing is possible at any time. Video tutorials are available for each step. Share your scenario via URL. Some videos are hosted on YouTube. If your district blocks YouTube, the videos may not be viewable. You could always view the videos at home and bring them to class "on a stick" to share. Use a tool such as KeepVid, reviewed here, to download the videos from YouTube.

tag(s): animation (65), maps (293), timelines (64)

In the Classroom

Create a History in Motion timeline to share with the entire class to introduce them to the program, or simply watch the introductory video together using an interactive whiteboard or projector. There are also example projects to view. If your class discusses current events, this would be an excellent tool to use to track the history of certain issues. To do this more easily use a tool like Wide Angle Window Into Global History, reviewed here. Language arts students can trace the events in a novel and history students can trace historical events such as the Civil Rights Movement (or certain aspects of) or famous people. When assigning a biography for math or science use this tool to trace where and when the famous person's theories or inventions spread. Now that would be an interesting take on a biography project! Be sure to share the URL on your class web page for students to work on the program and watch the "How-To" videos at home.

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Black History Month Resources - PBS

Grades
K to 12
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Commemorate Black History Month with 20 lesson plans and resources covering a variety of topics including racial discrimination, civil rights, and discussions about race in current...more
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Commemorate Black History Month with 20 lesson plans and resources covering a variety of topics including racial discrimination, civil rights, and discussions about race in current events. Scroll through the page to view topics and grade level suggestions. Content ranges from a history of discrimination through current events such as debating race through the Trayvon Martin shooting. Some lessons also contain Common Core correlations.

tag(s): black history (61), civil rights (122), martin luther king (38), racism (18), video (276)

In the Classroom

Explore this site for many different lessons and resources to use during Black History Month and throughout the year. Use lessons found here to differentiate for students of different levels. Be sure to check out the Discrimination - fair or unfair? lesson plan that is designed specifically for students who have difficulty with verbal and written expression.
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Visualizing Emancipation - The University of Richmond

Grades
9 to 12
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Visualizing Emancipation is a map based resource that presents the date and place of hundreds of discrete events, documents, and artifacts across the period 1861-1865 all of which relate...more
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Visualizing Emancipation is a map based resource that presents the date and place of hundreds of discrete events, documents, and artifacts across the period 1861-1865 all of which relate to the end of slavery. View the map chronologically, zoom in to look at a smaller geographic area, sort the data points by theme or by source type, and discover a more nuanced understanding of how the U.S. ended legal slavery. Students might be forgiven for believing that slavery ended in the United States the day the Emancipation Proclamation was issued. The truth is, of course, much more complicated.

tag(s): black history (61), civil rights (122), civil war (145), constitution (87), emancipation proclamation (12), slavery (72)

In the Classroom

The interactive map is well suited for use on an interactive whiteboard or projector. There are grade leveled lesson plans tied to Common Core Standards, as well as Featured events that are particularly important in telling the story of emancipation. Each event or document is categorized by theme, and has its own unique URL that can be shared with students as they do their own research. It's also possible to download a large spread sheet of the events as a list rather than as a map. If it's geographically relevant, consider using your own community as an example and research local events related to emancipation. Consider a discussion of how significant legal changes in the United States occur within the context of cultural change. Does legal change result in immediate cultural change? Why or why not? What happens when legal change is imposed on those who do not agree? Have students share their thoughts by creating an online collaborative bulletin board like Scrumblr, reviewed here (quick start - no membership required!).

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100 Leaders in World History - National History Day

Grades
7 to 12
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National History Day has developed this gallery of 100 "significant" leaders in world history. You can browse the leaders individually or search by type (political, military, scientific),...more
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National History Day has developed this gallery of 100 "significant" leaders in world history. You can browse the leaders individually or search by type (political, military, scientific), sphere of geographic influence, or time period. Each leader's entry includes some brief biographical information, characteristics as a leader, and links to further information. Rather than providing extensive information about each person on the site, the gallery provides a context for considering and comparing individual leaders. A separate section provides extensive classroom resources for discussing leadership and using the site to illustrate the traits of leaders. There are downloadable posters for each leader as well as a poster that includes all 100 that can be printed for classroom use. There are, of course, lots of connections to the National History Day competition, but there is plenty of good content here regardless of whether students intend to enter.

tag(s): art history (72), black history (61), famous people (21), native americans (78)

In the Classroom

It goes without saying that this is a great resource for students thinking about a National History Day project. However, any course or lesson involving leadership will find lots of good supporting content here. Consider categories of leaders across time, for example. Do political leaders exhibit similar traits regardless of the time period in which they lived? Are there differences between male and female leaders? Are there different kinds of leaders? Are leaders always good? Help students analyze these questions using a tool such as Canva, reviewed here, or Draw.io, reviewed here, to make charts for the comparisons. Share this site during Women's History Month, Black History Month, and other observances that highlight "significant" leaders.
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Created Equal - National Endowment for the Humanities

Grades
9 to 12
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Four documentary films related to the Civil Rights Movement, available to stream either in part or in their entirety, form the centerpiece of this effort from the National Endowment...more
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Four documentary films related to the Civil Rights Movement, available to stream either in part or in their entirety, form the centerpiece of this effort from the National Endowment for the Humanities. The films cover time periods beginning with the Abolitionist Movement and continuing through the Freedom Marches and the turbulent 1960s. Explore the meaning of freedom and equality in the United States with relevance still today. There are teacher resources, lesson plans, and suggestions for aligning lessons to the Common Core.

tag(s): bill of rights (29), black history (61), civil rights (122), civil war (145), emancipation proclamation (12), segregation (15)

In the Classroom

The documentaries, or the excerpts presented, are all available to stream from the site. While they may be too lengthy to show in their entirety during one class period, they have also been divided into clips according to themes. For example, Equality is part of the full video about Law and the Strategy of Nonviolence. This makes them more adaptable for classroom use. Share the videos on your interactive whiteboard or projector, or flip your class using EdPuzzle, reviewed here, and have students watch clips at home and come back to class ready to discuss. EdPuzzle is a great way to take sections of videos and add your own voice or add questions within the video. Alternatively, you could use VideoAnt, reviewed here, where students can ask questions about the parts they where they need clarification. The issues raised by these Created Equal documentaries may be easily incorporated into lessons related to the Civil Rights Movement, modern U.S. history, Black History Month, or civics and government. Use these videos as conversation starters in the classroom.
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The HistoryMakers - The HistoryMakers

Grades
6 to 12
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The HistoryMakers offers an incredibly rich and deep collection of biographies and oral histories of 2000 African Americans who have made history in their respective fields. The database...more
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The HistoryMakers offers an incredibly rich and deep collection of biographies and oral histories of 2000 African Americans who have made history in their respective fields. The database allows you to search across 15 fields, for example, for "Artmakers," "Educationmakers," or "Sciencemakers." Special Collections curate additional groups of HistoryMakers such as Negro Baseball Players. The Advanced Search tool allows a search by birthplace, occupation, and even something like favorite food. Each entry includes a photograph, a brief biography, some fun facts about the person; some entries also include a video clip of the oral history interview collected as a part of this project. The collection goes far beyond the usual luminaries. There are musicians, scientists, politicians, athletes, artists, doctors, scientists, and more, many of whom are little known and whose lives can seem more accessible than those who are famous. The HistoryMakers desires to be a resource for biographies of people from all walks of life whose accomplishments can inspire and inform. Access to the full video archives requires a membership fee, but there is plenty of content here at no cost.

tag(s): african american (114), artists (76), biographies (90), black history (61), business (57), heroes (24), medicine (70), politics (99), scientists (70), sports (98)

In the Classroom

Of course The HistoryMakers is ideal as a resource for projects for Black History Month, but this collection goes far beyond the usual luminaries who are often featured during February. Use the Advanced Search feature to compile a list of HistoryMakers from your home state or who attended a nearby school or college. Who among these 2000 has the same favorite color as you do? Who also loves ice cream? Students will find ways to relate directly to many of these HistoryMakers. Include this resource when investigating famous scientists, musicians, etc. in classes other than social studies and at times OTHER than Black History Month! Create an infographic about a HistoryMaker using a tool such as Easel.ly, reviewed here.
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Greensboro Sit-ins - Greensboro News-Record

Grades
6 to 12
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This site contains an in-depth look at the Greensboro Sit-Ins that took place on February 1, 1960. You can hear the mayor of the time, George Roach, talk about how ...more
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This site contains an in-depth look at the Greensboro Sit-Ins that took place on February 1, 1960. You can hear the mayor of the time, George Roach, talk about how the city avoided violent incidents (such as those in Birmingham, Alabama.) Several other features will give you a feel for the era and the significance of the sit-ins. Take a look at the video clips or listen to the audio files. There is also a timeline, complete with historic photos. Don't miss the historical photos and stories from the News & Record archives, with a photo from the first day of the sit-ins. The site includes a look at what the Greensboro Public Library has to offer on the subject. There is even an electronic bulletin board, where visitors can write what they think - or, for many, remember - about the sit-ins and see what other people have said. There are extensive links to other civil rights and black history sites. A PDF version of the February 1, 1960, newspaper detailing all of the events is also available. You will find the site especially informative because of the way it is organized. Don't miss this intriguing look at this historical time in American history.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): african american (114), civil rights (122)

In the Classroom

Share this site on your interactive whiteboard or projector. Allow students to explore on their own. Have students create a news report as a multimedia presentation using Thinglink, reviewed here. This site allows users to narrate a picture. Have students find Creative Commons images for their news report using a site (with credit, of course), like Compfight, reviewed here. Challenge your students to use a site such as Sutori (AKA Hstry), reviewed here, to include the Greensboro Sit-ins in a timeline of the Civil Rights Movement. Sutori creates an interactive timeline and can include music, photos, videos, and more. After viewing the site, ask students to research events in your state or city that related to the Civil Rights Movement.
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Jackie Robinson-Breaking Barriers in Sports and in Life - Scholastic & Major League Baseball

Grades
4 to 8
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Whether you are a lover of major league baseball or have a "soft spot" for overcoming the odds stacked against you and achieving a dream - the American dream, you ...more
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Whether you are a lover of major league baseball or have a "soft spot" for overcoming the odds stacked against you and achieving a dream - the American dream, you will find videos and activities on this Web site that will surely capture your heart and the hearts and attention of the boys as well as the girls in your class.

Every year, people across the country pause on April 15 to celebrate the historic event that marks the anniversary of Jackie Robinson breaking the color barrier in baseball in 1947. Use this educational program to bring the significance of Jackie Robinson's legacy to your classrooms. Although Breaking Barriers centers around an essay contest, you may choose to simply use the ideas to offer and assist your students in learning opportunities to teach them values that will enable them to face their own barriers and express themselves in written form. There are lessons, printables, book lists, and more that align with language arts, math, and social studies national standards.

tag(s): civil rights (122)

In the Classroom

Share the video of Jackie Robinson's daughter, Sharon Robinson, on your interactive whiteboard or projector. Listen to her personal story of her famous baseball player Dad's courage, determination, integrity, and persistence to break the color barrier on and off the playing field. Use an online tool like bubble.us reviewed here to engage students in whole class brainstorming of some of the real life barriers that students face today, and then lead into a journal writing activity for students to think about how to use Jackie Robinson's values to face and overcome barriers in their own lives. Whether you are celebrating the anniversary of Jackie Robinson Day, Black History month, a unit on courage and heroes, or introducing these concepts anytime during the year, the downloadable and whiteboard ready materials will increase the richness of your class discussions and broaden students' understanding of how to make a difference in their own lives and the lives of others.
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A Class Divided - Frontline/PBS-WGBH Educational Foundation

Grades
6 to 12
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This is one of the most requested programs for effectively conveying the reality of discrimination, what it feels like, and how it can change a person. Frontline, the PBS news-magazine...more
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This is one of the most requested programs for effectively conveying the reality of discrimination, what it feels like, and how it can change a person. Frontline, the PBS news-magazine show, produced this gripping piece that tackles the controversy, complexity, and consequences of discrimination that have shaped our society. This film and collection of activities are based on the 1970 documentary of the daring lesson that teacher Jane Elliott taught her third-grade class to give them a firsthand experience in the meaning of discrimination, immediately following the assassination of Reverend Martin Luther King Jr. The film shows what she taught the children and the impact that lesson had on their lives. It includes three major segments: the footage of the original documentary of Jane Elliott's third-graders, (approximately 20 minutes), the reunion of those third-graders 14 years later who talk about the effect her lesson has had on their lives, (approximately 7 minutes), and also Elliott teaching her lesson to adult employees of Iowa's prison system and how their reactions to her exercise were similar to those of the children, (approximately 20 minutes). A Teachers' Guide, as well as an abundance of supplementary materials that allow students to wrestle with realistic ideas, are available on this site.

tag(s): black history (61), bullying (53), civil rights (122), diversity (33), racism (18), segregation (15), tolerance (9)

In the Classroom

Help your students understand why Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated and raise their awareness of discrimination and the struggle for civil rights by involving them in active viewing of A Class Divided projected on your classroom interactive whiteboard or projector. You can view the film in its entirety, or in separate chapters followed by the Discussion Questions. You may want to give students a specific task to do during the film. For example, you might ask them to listen for a particular issue or the answers to a set of questions, or take notes in preparation for one of the post-viewing activities. Replay the video or pause for discussion whenever you choose for focused, in depth exploration. Depending on your students' background knowledge and grade level, you may want to review or introduce some of the basic tenets of the United States Constitution that provide the legal grounding for equality and protection of individual rights. Explain that there are examples in American history when individuals' rights were denied and that many civil rights activists were arrested for either challenging, demonstrating, or breaking rules that they thought were unfair. Pose some of the questions for written assignments and discussion. This is a perfect lesson for Black History Month! Divide the class into groups to brainstorm situations that exist today within our own communities, and how they would feel and deal with it if they were the subjects. Students can easily create mind maps using free tools from Teachersfirst, such as TUZZit, reviewed here, or ProcessOn, reviewed here. Have students choose words from songs to explore themes of freedom and equality, using Stories Behind the Songs reviewed here. High school students could extend this to a reading and study of the final chapter of "One America in the 21st Century," the 1998 report of President Bill Clinton's Initiative on Race, which lists 10 things that every American should do to promote racial reconciliation. Ask students to add anything they think is missing and make a commitment to continue the crusade to end discrimination.

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Teaching Tolerance - Southern Poverty Law Center

Grades
K to 12
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Teaching Tolerance is a project of the Southern Poverty Law Center and seeks to provide educators with tools to reduce prejudice of all kinds. You might already be familiar with ...more
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Teaching Tolerance is a project of the Southern Poverty Law Center and seeks to provide educators with tools to reduce prejudice of all kinds. You might already be familiar with this group's "Mix it Up" initiative which seeks to get middle school and high school students to sit with someone new for one day during lunch at the cafeteria. This site contains lesson plans, links for teachers, parents, teens, and kids, current topics related to prejudice, an on-line version of the Teaching Tolerance magazine, an order form for free curriculum materials, and links to other resources.

The teacher's link offers classroom activities (many interactive) that tie in with the lesson plans. There is also a link to receive FREE kits and handbooks! The "Parents" link offers activities and ideas for ages 2-17! There are online activities, recommended books, "talking points" for parents, and more. The "For Teens" link includes a wealth of resources: video clips, lessons, 10 steps to take action, downloadable posters, essays, and true stories. The Kid's link offers "read," "Explore," and "Play" options for elementary (and younger middle school) students. A "sign up" box appears when you first enter the site, click on the X to remove the box.

tag(s): bullying (53), diversity (33), tolerance (9)

In the Classroom

Of course, the obvious uses for this site include preparing for Black History Month or Women's History Month, consult this site for more than that! Don't just visit the Teacher's link, but check out the kids and teens links for videos and interactive that you can share on your projector or interactive whiteboard. If you are unsure of how to approach a touchy subject with your students--either a subject from the news like the military's "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" rules, or something that is happening in your school or community, this site can provide resources for you and your students. Subscribe to Tolerance.org's emailed newsletter, or order one of the curriculum kits; the newest one is Viva la Causa about Cesar Chavez and the struggle for justice for farmworkers in the 1960s. This is a great addition to your school's anti-bully program! Take advantage of the free lesson plans, class activities, interactive, and book recommendations. This is definitely one to list on your class website!
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Comments

This houses a WEALTH of resources! Thank you, Teaching TOLERANCE. Patricia, NJ, Grades: 6 - 12

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