TeachersFirst - Featured Sites: Week of Jun 18, 2017

Here are this week's features. Clicking the tags in the description area of each listing will present a list of other resources with this topic. | Click here to return to the Featured Sites Archive

 

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Who, Me? Biased? - New York Times

Grades
5 to 12
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Explore bias through this series of videos from the New York Times. Using titles such as Peanut Butter, Jelly, and Racism, and Why We're Awkward, this series explores types ...more
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Explore bias through this series of videos from the New York Times. Using titles such as Peanut Butter, Jelly, and Racism, and Why We're Awkward, this series explores types of bias, how to address and change prejudices, and ways to address racism. Most videos run around 2 minutes in length, making them perfect for a short introduction to the topics addressed.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): black history (61), bullying (53), civil rights (122), diversity (33), racism (18), tolerance (9)

In the Classroom

Share videos with students either with a projector, an interactive whiteboard, or use the link or embed codes on your class website to view at home. Have students view from home using VideoAnt, reviewed here, where students can stop the video and ask questions about the parts where they need clarification on the video! Have cooperative learning groups create podcasts sharing their insight into biases and racism along with suggestions on ways to address each problem. Use a site such as podOmatic, reviewed here. Share this site with your school's counselor for use with ongoing lessons in tolerance and diversity.

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Students Investigating Primary Sources - Florida Joint Center for Citizenship

Grades
2 to 12
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Students Investigating Primary Sources is a series of lessons designed through a collaboration with the National Archives, Pinellas County Public Schools, and Brevard Public Schools...more
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Students Investigating Primary Sources is a series of lessons designed through a collaboration with the National Archives, Pinellas County Public Schools, and Brevard Public Schools for 2nd grade through High School Students. Choose from topics including separation of power and women's right to vote. Each lesson correlates to National Standards and a PDF link to the original activity including vocabulary, handouts, and other necessary materials.

tag(s): branches of government (50), civil rights (122), constitution (87), primary sources (93), womens suffrage (26)

In the Classroom

Benefit from the free lessons on this site for use when teaching the use of primary sources. Challenge younger students to demonstrate concepts learned by creating a presentation using slides, reviewed here, and older students to use a presentation tool from Lucidpress, reviewed here. The easy drag and drop features of Lucidpress allow you to personalize flyers, posters, presentations, and more. Ask students to incorporate primary sources and other research materials into an interactive timeline using Timeglider, reviewed here, as a visual look at historical events over a certain period.
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Immigrant Stories - Immigration History Research Center Univ of Minnesota

Grades
6 to 12
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Immigrant Stories is a collection of videos sharing personal and family immigration stories. Add your story to the collection by following posted instructions and video tutorials. View...more
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Immigrant Stories is a collection of videos sharing personal and family immigration stories. Add your story to the collection by following posted instructions and video tutorials. View all of the stories here. Each short video includes information about the participant and a downloadable transcript. Click on tags to find additional videos from participants discussing the same country or region.

tag(s): immigrants (21), immigration (58), migration (59)

In the Classroom

Have your ESL/ELL students share their stories here (with permission from parents) when doing a biography writing unit. Have all students search for stories of immigrants whose ethnic background resembles their own. Have each student choose one story to read about and share a quick multimedia project with the class, such as a simple online posters using PicLits, reviewed here. Ask students who have a relative who is an immigrant to interview them, and then use a tool such as the 3 Circle Venn Diagram, reviewed here, to compare the experiences. This could be done using a story from the same country, or other countries. Use stories from this site as a writing prompt for a poem or digital story about an aspect of immigrant life, asking students to put themselves in the immigrant's shoes. For presentations of digital stories challenge students to use UtellStory, reviewed here. This tool allows narrating and adding text to a picture. For the advanced digital atudent and teacher challenge them to create their story as a game using Pencil Code Gym, reviewed here.
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Military History Now - NH Mallett

Grades
8 to 12
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Military History Now is dedicated to sharing the strange, off-beat, and lesser-known aspects of military history. Scroll through the site to find interesting stories of the military...more
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Military History Now is dedicated to sharing the strange, off-beat, and lesser-known aspects of military history. Scroll through the site to find interesting stories of the military from around the world, both recent and long ago. Recent posts include the story behind the famous "I Want You" poster featuring Uncle Sam and 10 Most Famous Battle Cries. Use the keyword search to find specific information, or click on related links in posts to find more information on a topic.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): battles (19), famous people (21), veterans (21)

In the Classroom

Military History Now is an excellent addition to any history classroom. Share information from posts with students to add background information to any topic. Encourage students to browse the site on their own to find little-known facts to share with others. Have students create an annotated image including text boxes and related links using a tool such as Thinglink, reviewed here, to share information learned.

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National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection Stories - National Museum of African American History and Culture

Grades
4 to 12
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These Collection Stories look at the personal feelings and interpretation of the objects staff members have cataloged in the Museum. These stunning short stories focus on items from...more
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These Collection Stories look at the personal feelings and interpretation of the objects staff members have cataloged in the Museum. These stunning short stories focus on items from historical events and famous people. One example is Dress for the Occasion; view the first day of school dress worn by Carlotta Walls as she entered Little Rock Central High School in 1957 as part of the Little Rock Nine's integration efforts. Other stories take a look at Muhammed Ali, Carl Lewis, The Wiz: The Supersoul Musical 'Wizard of Oz,' and the watches that survived a brutal assassination (Moments Captured in Time).

tag(s): african american (114), black history (61), cross cultural understanding (120)

In the Classroom

Share stories from this collection to provide a personal look at events from African-American history in the United States. Use stories as an example, and ask students to find additional artifacts from the National Museum and research to discover the story behind the item, or have students bring an item from their home to tell the story of its history. For either of these ideas, encourage students to create online books for sharing the stories using a tool such as Ourboox, reviewed here. Ask students to find local residents with knowledge of historical events to come talk to your class about the "behind the scenes" story, or set up a Skype call with an African-American leader. Use these stories for informational reading in your Language Arts classroom, and as a wonderful resource to use for covering the informational reading standards required with the CCSS.

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Magna Carta 800th Anniversary - Magna Carta 2015 Committee

Grades
8 to 12
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2015 marked the 800th anniversary of Magna Carta, one of the founding documents of modern democratic society. In recognition of this anniversary this committee collected a number of...more
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2015 marked the 800th anniversary of Magna Carta, one of the founding documents of modern democratic society. In recognition of this anniversary this committee collected a number of resources for celebrating and understanding its significance to history. An interactive timeline highlights events prior to and following the signing of Magna Carta. Essays discuss Magna Carta's impact on modern democracy. An interactive map places events in geographic contexts. And perhaps you're planning a trip to the UK for the celebrations? Find visitors' resources and a calendar of commemorative events. Check out the resources under Schools, including biographies of those involved (including a whole section on women) in the development of the document. There are lesson plans aligned with the UK's school system, and a quick Q&A overview of the importance of Magna Carta today. Don't miss the YouTube video explaining the work of Britain's Parliament in just over 60 seconds. If your district blocks YouTube, then this video (and others) may not be viewable. You could always view the videos at home and bring them to class "on a stick" to share. Use a tool such as KeepVid, reviewed here, to download the videos from YouTube.

tag(s): branches of government (50), democracy (13), great britain (18)

In the Classroom

No study of modern democratic political systems is complete without an understanding of Magna Carta. On its anniversary, incorporate the interactive timeline into a discussion of the roots of the US Declaration of Independence or the post WW2 Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Compare and contrast the different ways the principles that underpin Magna Carta have been transformed into democratically elected governments across the world.
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Visualizing Emancipation - The University of Richmond

Grades
9 to 12
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Visualizing Emancipation is a map based resource that presents the date and place of hundreds of discrete events, documents, and artifacts across the period 1861-1865 all of which relate...more
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Visualizing Emancipation is a map based resource that presents the date and place of hundreds of discrete events, documents, and artifacts across the period 1861-1865 all of which relate to the end of slavery. View the map chronologically, zoom in to look at a smaller geographic area, sort the data points by theme or by source type, and discover a more nuanced understanding of how the U.S. ended legal slavery. Students might be forgiven for believing that slavery ended in the United States the day the Emancipation Proclamation was issued. The truth is, of course, much more complicated.

tag(s): black history (61), civil rights (122), civil war (145), constitution (87), emancipation proclamation (12), slavery (72)

In the Classroom

The interactive map is well suited for use on an interactive whiteboard or projector. There are grade leveled lesson plans tied to Common Core Standards, as well as Featured events that are particularly important in telling the story of emancipation. Each event or document is categorized by theme, and has its own unique URL that can be shared with students as they do their own research. It's also possible to download a large spread sheet of the events as a list rather than as a map. If it's geographically relevant, consider using your own community as an example and research local events related to emancipation. Consider a discussion of how significant legal changes in the United States occur within the context of cultural change. Does legal change result in immediate cultural change? Why or why not? What happens when legal change is imposed on those who do not agree? Have students share their thoughts by creating an online collaborative bulletin board like Scrumblr, reviewed here (quick start - no membership required!).

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Created Equal - National Endowment for the Humanities

Grades
9 to 12
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Four documentary films related to the Civil Rights Movement, available to stream either in part or in their entirety, form the centerpiece of this effort from the National Endowment...more
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Four documentary films related to the Civil Rights Movement, available to stream either in part or in their entirety, form the centerpiece of this effort from the National Endowment for the Humanities. The films cover time periods beginning with the Abolitionist Movement and continuing through the Freedom Marches and the turbulent 1960s. Explore the meaning of freedom and equality in the United States with relevance still today. There are teacher resources, lesson plans, and suggestions for aligning lessons to the Common Core.

tag(s): bill of rights (29), black history (61), civil rights (122), civil war (145), emancipation proclamation (12), segregation (15)

In the Classroom

The documentaries, or the excerpts presented, are all available to stream from the site. While they may be too lengthy to show in their entirety during one class period, they have also been divided into clips according to themes. For example, Equality is part of the full video about Law and the Strategy of Nonviolence. This makes them more adaptable for classroom use. Share the videos on your interactive whiteboard or projector, or flip your class using EdPuzzle, reviewed here, and have students watch clips at home and come back to class ready to discuss. EdPuzzle is a great way to take sections of videos and add your own voice or add questions within the video. Alternatively, you could use VideoAnt, reviewed here, where students can ask questions about the parts they where they need clarification. The issues raised by these Created Equal documentaries may be easily incorporated into lessons related to the Civil Rights Movement, modern U.S. history, Black History Month, or civics and government. Use these videos as conversation starters in the classroom.
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CurriConnects Booklist: By the People - TeachersFirst

Grades
K to 12
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Find books about how our U.S. government works and how to take part in that process. These books include topics such as what it means to be a citizen, how ...more
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Find books about how our U.S. government works and how to take part in that process. These books include topics such as what it means to be a citizen, how our government works, and the tough decisions that people make -- both citizens and those who work in government. Discover civics-related topics such as voting, creating laws, enforcing laws, and the underlying principles of democracy. The collection includes both true and fictional tales about communities and government and books for all grade levels. CurriConnects thematic book lists include ISBN numbers for ordering or searching, interest grade levels, ESL levels and Lexiles''® to match student independent reading levels to challenge, not frustrate. For more on text complexity and Lexiles''®, see this information from the Lexile Framework. Don't miss other CurriConnects themes being added regularly. If your library does not have the books, try interlibrary loan!

tag(s): book lists (133), branches of government (50), congress (34), constitution (87), presidents (132)

In the Classroom

Encourage students to select independent reading from this list as part of a citizenship unit, as a focus for Constitution Day, or in a civics/government class.

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Gettysburg by the Numbers - TeachersFirst

Grades
5 to 10
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Gettysburg by the Numbers (GBTN) is a web-based, interactive experience of the Battle of Gettysburg through numbers and infographics that raise questions and invite connections. Exploring...more
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Gettysburg by the Numbers (GBTN) is a web-based, interactive experience of the Battle of Gettysburg through numbers and infographics that raise questions and invite connections. Exploring Gettysburg "by the numbers" invites you to move beyond dates and facts to questions that make the battle more meaningful and real. Dig into the numbers to imagine the weather, the clothing, the communications, the people, the weapons, and--yes -- the cleanup from three devastating, pivotal July days in 1863. Delve into the infographics and accompanying questions to connect what was then with what is now. The site includes ideas for families and for teachers to use it in the classroom. Be sure to click on the large color image of the battle to get the "big picture." Teachers will want to explore the extensive "For Teachers" section that offers materials, lesson ideas, Common Core correlations, and much more.

tag(s): civil war (145), gettysburg (26)

In the Classroom

Gettysburg exemplifies many aspects of the Civil War experience and of U.S. life during the 1860s. Use this resource as a whole class introduction to the Civil War or specifically to the Battle of Gettysburg. Extensive teacher materials include downloadable and customizable handouts for students to "get the basics" about the battle or extend their understanding through small group or individual projects on battle-related topics that interest them. Coordinate with your math teacher to reinforce concepts of proportion, percent, ratio, and graphing with real data about Gettysburg. Differentiate for your students by helping them select from more concrete or more open-ended "questions" included with each detail about the battle. You can make this a one-day "quick tour" or a week long journey. Find project ideas included in these questions. There is even a customizable project rubric in the teacher materials. Be sure to share this link on your class web page for curious students (and families) to explore on their own outside of class!

Comments

Excellent resource for research Arthur, TX, Grades: 0 - 12

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Rare Flags - Anthony Iasso

Grades
5 to 12
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Showcase the history of the American Flag through images and stories at Rare Flags. Visit the galleries of American and Civil War flags. Search the collection using the search bar....more
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Showcase the history of the American Flag through images and stories at Rare Flags. Visit the galleries of American and Civil War flags. Search the collection using the search bar. Click on the flag image to view a description of the image with an approximate date, location, and information about construction. Don't miss the Timeline. Although it isn't interactive, it does provide a wealth of information.

tag(s): american flag (11), flags (22)

In the Classroom

Use the Rare Flags site as part of any American History unit to view a flag of the time period. Show the timeline on your interactive whiteboard or projector to display changes of the flag over our history. Choose a few different styles of flags and ask students to choose their favorite. For this create a quick poll (with no membership required) using SurveyRock, reviewed here. Challenge students to design their own flags for 13, 48, or 50 states. Celebrate Flag Day using this site!

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Civil War Read-Alouds - TeachersFirst

Grades
K to 6
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This read-aloud collection, written by an experienced elementary library/media specialist, includes books to read aloud in elementary classes. It also includes the lesson ideas to...more
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This read-aloud collection, written by an experienced elementary library/media specialist, includes books to read aloud in elementary classes. It also includes the lesson ideas to do before, during, and after the read-aloud. Infuse an extra measure of history into your curriculum and tap into the richness of our nation's story while you build reading and listening skills. The books about the Civil War and related topics include a wealth of fictional and informational literature to share with your students. The lists and related activities are segmented into lower, middle, and upper elementary. There are Lexile'® levels for the books (where available). If your library does not have the books you want to use from this list, try using the ISBN numbers to borrow them on interlibrary loan from a public library nearby.

tag(s): civil war (145), lincoln (86), slavery (72)

In the Classroom

These read-alouds are perfect during February celebrations of Presidents Day and Black History Month but could be used any time. If your social studies curriculum includes the CIvil War or you simply want to connect the interrelated topics of Lincoln, slavery, and the Civil War, this is a great place to start.

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The Star Spangled Banner - Smithsonian Institue

Grades
3 to 12
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This site from the Smithsonian provides ample information about the American Flag, as well as early American history. The Explore option on the site allows you to investigate and discover...more
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This site from the Smithsonian provides ample information about the American Flag, as well as early American history. The Explore option on the site allows you to investigate and discover important facts about the flag and its creation. There is also a section about the National Anthem, as well as an interactive quiz about the early days of American government. A great site for Flag Day or early U.S. history!

tag(s): american flag (11), american revolution (89), evolution (101), flag day (6), national anthem (4)

In the Classroom

Use the interactive quiz on this site as a review tool before an assessment or to introduce a mini-unit on the flag. Introduce the site on the interactive whiteboard before allowing students to complete the quiz individually on classroom computers. Because of the amount of reading on the site, be sure to provide lower achieving readers with the vocabulary beforehand or a tool to help them look up complex words. Younger students would do better with partner readers or whole-class reading on an interactive whiteboard where they could highlight new words.

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Dates That Matter - TeachersFirst

Grades
5 to 12
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Dates That Matter provides a new perspective on history by placing each day-in-history event in broader context and explaining its long-term impact. History is a fabric woven of many...more
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Dates That Matter provides a new perspective on history by placing each day-in-history event in broader context and explaining its long-term impact. History is a fabric woven of many events, and Dates That Matter helps students see the full tapestry. The dates display on a projector-ready screen: A single sentence reveals something about the date. You then click to see a sequence of thought-provoking questions to guide students to a greater understanding of interrelationships as they try to guess the actual event. When the historical event finally shows on screen, a further explanation, Why does it matter?, fills in the remaining context and offers reviewed links to learn more. Teachers who work with low readers might try using these daily clues to teach the reading strategy of connecting what you read with prior knowledge to place new learning in context. A full, annotated version of each date is available from the Teacher page at the end so you can plan for student responses and have hints for guiding the discussion. You can also preview upcoming dates to choose those you may want to put in your weekly plans.

tag(s): calendars (46), substitutes (21)

In the Classroom

Begin your social studies class once or twice a week by sharing a Date That Matters on a projector or interactive whiteboard to foster broader understanding of the connections that form world history. Or use the links at the end as an extra credit or enrichment opportunity or for gifted students to investigate more. Focus class attention as everyone enters by projecting the date and starting sentence. Make this one a link on your teacher web page for students (and parents) to access outside of school. Substitutes will also appreciate this meaningful and engaging way to connect today with students' prior history knowledge for more than isolated factoid. It's a lesson ready to go!
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Comments

This is a terrific site for daily writing and "Do Nows" for my ELA classes. In addition, the site can be used for Morning Meeting/Advisory. Patricia, NJ, Grades: 6 - 12

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