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Votes for Women - The 19th Amendment - TeachersFirst

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4 to 12
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Votes for Women - The 19th Amendment is part of the TeachersFirst Help! I lost my media/library specialist collection found here...more
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Votes for Women - The 19th Amendment is part of the TeachersFirst Help! I lost my media/library specialist collection found here that features topics and resources that focus on integrating research with technology. Information begins with a short introductory paragraph about the 19th Amendment and extensive background information. The Activities section shares suggested book lists, primary sources, and a WebQuest research project. Continue down the site to find Extension activities that incorporate research skills into additional classroom opportunities such as debates and documentary creation. Ideas found on this resource include correlation to ISTE and AASL National School Library Standards.

tag(s): 1900s (56), constitution (85), women (107), womens suffrage (35)

In the Classroom

Begin by browsing through the many suggested classroom activities found in this resource. Organize a suggested book list or research resources for students using a curation tool like Symbaloo, reviewed here, as means for organizing information into one place. Sort items in your Symbaloo by using the color-coding option for the icons. For example, make book suggestions blue, primary source links yellow, etc. As students prepare to share their research and final projects, provide options for sharing information. Suggest students make a presentation with Google Slides, reviewed here, a video using Adobe Creative Cloud Express Video Maker, reviewed here, or a multimedia presentation created with Sway, reviewed here.
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History of Voting in America - Office of Secretary of State Washington

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5 to 12
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This helpful document provides a visual timeline sharing the history of voting from 1776 through the present time. Black and white images and simple explanations guide voting, beginning...more
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This helpful document provides a visual timeline sharing the history of voting from 1776 through the present time. Black and white images and simple explanations guide voting, beginning with the introduction of voting for white men over twenty-one and chronicles changes throughout the years, including eliminating racial barriers and women's voting rights. Although some information is specific to Washington State, this timeline includes all federal voting benchmarks, making it appropriate for use in any classroom. This document is available for viewing online and as a downloadable PDF document.

tag(s): civil rights (169), constitution (85), elections (75), immigrants (30), womens suffrage (35)

In the Classroom

Bookmark and save this document for use with any lessons on voting and to provide context during American History units. The visuals included on the timeline are especially helpful for visual learners to give context and a deeper understanding of the progression from 1776. Engage students by introducing this information with a gamification app such as Blooket, reviewed here. Blooket works well with both in-person and remote learning and offers a variety of game options, including games for single players and groups. Additional Blooket options are offered as homework, meaning students participate at their leisure during the provided time frame. Enhance student learning by creating timelines that include information from this document and additional information from your lessons. Canva, reviewed here, offers many easy to use timeline templates that allow you to add links to outside sites, images, and more. Extend learning by asking students to interview local election officials or senior citizens to share their experience with voting rights and regulations. Ask students to create presentations sharing what they learned using Google Slides, reviewed here, or Microsoft PowerPoint Online, reviewed here. Include links to audio recordings of interviews, add images, supporting videos, and more.
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Amelia Earhart - History.com

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5 to 12
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Discover the story of Amelia Earhart's life and accomplishments through the video and story shared at History.com. The short video tells about Earhart's early life and her introduction...more
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Discover the story of Amelia Earhart's life and accomplishments through the video and story shared at History.com. The short video tells about Earhart's early life and her introduction to the field of aviation. Then, follow the page to read about her flight across the Atlantic and learn about theories about her mysterious disappearance.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): 1900s (56), aviation (32), careers (132), flight (30), transformations (12), women (107)

In the Classroom

Share this site with students when learning about famous women, aviation pioneers, or important events from the 1900s. Share your resources using Symbaloo, reviewed here, and organize information on your Symbaloo by color. For example, add biographies as one color and important events as another. Enhance learning by creating an interactive map together with your students using Google My Maps, reviewed here, to follow Earhart's travels around the world along with other famous aviators. Add stops to your map that share the story of events in the location, including images and links to additional information. As a final project, ask students or student groups to create an interactive timeline of Amelia Earhart's life using one of the timeline creation tools located here. Two suggestions are (click on the tool name to access the review): Timeline Infographic Templates and History in Motion.

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The Role of Women - Stanford History Education Group

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8 to 12
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Students use a political cartoon as a starting point to determine how the evidence supports a historical argument. The focus of the 1912 cartoon is on the shift of women ...more
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Students use a political cartoon as a starting point to determine how the evidence supports a historical argument. The focus of the 1912 cartoon is on the shift of women from more traditional roles at home and their move toward non-traditional places in the workforce. Register for a free account to access the materials, including directions for the assessment, a rubric, and links to Library of Congress materials.

tag(s): 1900s (56), comics and cartoons (46), womens suffrage (35)

In the Classroom

Include this assessment as part of any American History lessons focused on the changing role of women and lessons about life in the early 1900s. Use the ideas found in this quick assessment with other political cartoons of the time. Running for Office - Cartoons Of Clifford K. Berryman, reviewed here, is a resource for finding additional cartoons from the early 20th century. After students spend time assessing the features that make up political cartoons, enhance learning and ask them to create their own cartoon using Comic Strip Templates from Canva, reviewed here. Extend learning by sharing student-created cartoons using Odyssey, reviewed here. Use Odyssey to share and compare the political feel of the time period through stories told across the country.
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If/Then Collection - If/Then

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K to 12
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The If/Then Collection is a free resource for finding and sharing images and videos of women related to STEM topics. Search the collection by media type, discipline, location, or ambassador...more
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The If/Then Collection is a free resource for finding and sharing images and videos of women related to STEM topics. Search the collection by media type, discipline, location, or ambassador name. Another option is to browse through the featured categories found on the home page, including topics such as sports, explorers, and hero videos. Then, share items by selecting the share icon located on each thumbnail image. The required prompt asks you to complete a short form before sharing. The form includes the user's email, the purpose for using the content, and the checkbox agreeing to proper use. Although items on the site are available for free use without crediting the photographer or videographer, proper credit is always encouraged when possible.

tag(s): careers (132), engineering (109), images (252), photography (129), STEM (225), video (243)

In the Classroom

Include this site with your other bookmarks for photo and video resources to use on any occasion. Consider using Symbaloo Edu, reviewed here, or Wakelet, reviewed here, to curate media resources to share with students. Include a link to your Wakelet or Symbaloo collection on your class web page for you and your students to access at any time. Include images from this site with many class projects such as biographies, career research, or science lab reports. Include images in media projects such a video explainers created using Binumi, reviewed here, with voice overs and templates, or presentations made with Sway, reviewed here.

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Annie Jump Cannon: Biographical Digital Resources - Project PHaEDRA

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6 to 12
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Learn about Annie Jump Cannon, an American astronomer whose work was crucial in developing our categorizing system of stars at this collection hosted by the Smithsonian Learning Institute....more
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Learn about Annie Jump Cannon, an American astronomer whose work was crucial in developing our categorizing system of stars at this collection hosted by the Smithsonian Learning Institute. The collection consists of thirty-five resources that include photographs, videos, articles, and more. Select any thumbnail to view the full content. Use the links to download or share items. Creating an account at the Smithsonian Learning Center isn't necessary; however, it allows you to save items and personalize collections.

tag(s): biographies (90), scientists (62), stars (60), STEM (225), women (107)

In the Classroom

Include this collection with your other resources when teaching lessons about astronomers, famous women, or scientists. Use Wakelet, reviewed here, to curate resources and share with students. As you provide time for students to explore this collection, use edpuzzle, reviewed here, with the videos to enhance learning. Add questions or comments to the videos that encourage students to focus on the importance of Cannon's work in the field of astronomy. When sharing articles that contain difficult reading selections, use Read Ahead, reviewed here, to transform the text into a Guided Reading activity that includes a focus on keywords and vocabulary found in the text.
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Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin and the Components of Stars - Project PHaEDRA

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6 to 12
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Learn about the woman whose thesis was declared to be "the most brilliant Ph.D. thesis ever written in astronomy" by exploring this interesting collection of videos, articles, images,...more
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Learn about the woman whose thesis was declared to be "the most brilliant Ph.D. thesis ever written in astronomy" by exploring this interesting collection of videos, articles, images, and more. Browse the site to view thumbnails of forty items and open to view the resources. Download items or share using the provided links. Open a free Smithsonian Learning Institute account to save favorites for further use or create your collections from materials available on the Smithsonian Learning Institute's site.

tag(s): biographies (90), elements (32), scientists (62), stars (60), STEM (225), women (107)

In the Classroom

Share this collection with students to explore when learning about famous Women in History, scientific advancements, or during an astronomy unit. Ask collaborative groups to work together and share information found in the collection. Use a collaborative note-taking tool such as Notejoy, reviewed here, to have students share ideas and information using checklists, adding images and links, and documenting individual contributions to the project. Ask groups or individuals to share their learning using a simple video creation tool like Binumi, reviewed here, with voice overs and templates. Ask students to include images and require they include proper citations along with their original work.
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The Science of Henrietta Swan Leavitt - Project PHaEDRA

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6 to 12
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Learn about American astronomer Henrietta Swan Leavitt with this twenty-piece collection that tells the story of her discoveries while working at the Harvard College Observatory as...more
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Learn about American astronomer Henrietta Swan Leavitt with this twenty-piece collection that tells the story of her discoveries while working at the Harvard College Observatory as a "computer." This collection includes images of plate glass used for computer calculations, videos, quiz questions, and photos of Leavitt. Choose any thumbnail to open and view each resource. Use the links within each resource to share or download information. Registration isn't required; however, creating a free account offers you the opportunity to save and favorite items within personalized collections.

tag(s): computers (100), scientists (62), STEM (225), women (107)

In the Classroom

Bookmark and save this collection for use during Women's History Month or during studies of famous scientists. Be sure to show students how to use the citation link found with each resource (select the quotation mark icon) when downloading and using items from this collection. Challenge students to learn more about Leavitt by starting with a Flip, reviewed here, sharing one of the plate glass images and encouraging students to speculate on what they are looking at. Include items from this collection with your other resources and share them with students on a Padlet, reviewed here. Add additional articles and videos to your Padlet for students to explore. Extend learning by asking students to conduct further research to learn about Leavitt, then share their findings using one of the presentation tools found at Adobe Creative Cloud Express for Education, reviewed here, such as flyers, videos, or infographics.

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The Sojourner Truth Project - Leslie Podell

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8 to 12
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The Sojourner Truth Project explores the different versions and background behind changes in Sojourner Truth's 1851 "Aint I a Woman?" speech. The most well-known version of the speech...more
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The Sojourner Truth Project explores the different versions and background behind changes in Sojourner Truth's 1851 "Aint I a Woman?" speech. The most well-known version of the speech was modified in 1863 that misrepresents the original words and intentions of the speech. Select the link to compare the two versions that include highlighted differences. Listen to readings of the speech in a variety of videos in contemporary dialects. The videos are hosted on YouTube. If your district blocks YouTube, then they may not be viewable.

tag(s): black history (98), civil rights (169), primary sources (101), womens suffrage (35)

In the Classroom

Include information from this site as part of lessons on women's rights and slavery. Create an online course using Eduflow, reviewed here, to guide students through their exploration of the work of Sojourner Truth. Include additional information for students to use for comparison, guide students through their comparison of the two texts, and add videos for students to view. Eduflow offers tools for in-app recordings to use for student discussions. Use edpuzzle, reviewed here, to add comments and questions into the videos to guide student thinking and focus on important areas within the speeches. Challenge students to explore and research other examples of revisions to history and share their findings through a multimedia presentation. Examples of presentation tools include Adobe Creative Cloud Express for Education, reviewed here, and Emaze, reviewed here.

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TeachersFirst Infusing Technology Blog - TeachersFirst

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K to 12
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Find hands-on, technology-infused ideas with the snack-size informative posts shared by TeachersFirst blog authors. Each post shares ideas for incorporating free resources into classrooms...more
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Find hands-on, technology-infused ideas with the snack-size informative posts shared by TeachersFirst blog authors. Each post shares ideas for incorporating free resources into classrooms based on the latest frameworks for effectively using technology to enhance learning. Not only do the blogs have technology-infused ideas, but the topics are always spot on for your classroom, using monthly celebrations such as Women's History, Black History, holidays, Get Caught Reading, and other appropriate topics like Using Cartoons to Empower Student Voice, Using Rubrics When teaching Remotely, and many more. Use the search feature to find and read blog posts for any topic. Don't forget to subscribe using your RSS feed and receive alerts with the latest posts.

tag(s): blogs (72), preK (246), teaching strategies (34)

In the Classroom

Bookmark and save this site as a professional development resource to keep you up to date with the latest technology and ideas on incorporating tech into any classroom. Share ideas with your peers during professional development sessions as you discuss your curriculum and ways to enhance learning. Take advantage of the information linked in the blog posts to expand your knowledge of the latest online resources and teaching frameworks.

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Reading Treks: Nadia: The Girl Who Couldn't Sit Still - TeachersFirst

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K to 5
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TeachersFirst Reading Treks create a virtual field trip of resources about a piece of literature or text using the My Maps feature of Google Maps. This Reading Trek provides inspiration...more
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TeachersFirst Reading Treks create a virtual field trip of resources about a piece of literature or text using the My Maps feature of Google Maps. This Reading Trek provides inspiration and suggestions for using the trade book Nadia: The Girl Who Couldn't Sit Still. This biographical picture book is about Nadia Comaneci, the Romanian gymnast, who had seven perfect scores in the 1976 Olympics. Use our robust Instructional Guide with students in grades K-5. Content correlates to Common Core Standards, ISTE Student Standards, and National Curriculum Standards for Social Studies. Find the entire selection of Reading Treks here.

tag(s): biographies (90), commoncore (79), europe (72), sports (75), women (107)

In the Classroom

Take advantage of the many suggested classroom uses for this resource found on the Instructional Guide (PDF). Include this book with others to share with your students when teaching about biographies and famous women. After learning about biographies, enhance learning by having students write biographies for other famous women athletes or famous people from a unit you are studying. Help students organize information and write biographies using resources found at Read Write Think, reviewed here. Search for the Bio Cube, reviewed here, that helps summarize information, or use the interactive Timeline reviewed here,to aid students in visualizing and creating a sequence of events. After completing their research, ask students to annotate an image using ThingLink, reviewed here. Include links to websites, text, and other information to share their biographies. Use Book Creator, reviewed here, to compile biographies created by your students into one digital resource for all to use. Book Creator allows you to add images, drawings, videos, and more to share a complete multimedia experience with their readers.
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Sojourner Truth: Abolitionist and Human Rights Activist - PBS Learning Media

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3 to 7
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Learn about Sojourner Truth and her fight against slavery along with her support for women and equal rights using primary sources in this lesson provided by PBS Learning Media. The...more
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Learn about Sojourner Truth and her fight against slavery along with her support for women and equal rights using primary sources in this lesson provided by PBS Learning Media. The lesson includes a video and two primary source documents - a photo of Sojourner Truth and excerpts from her most famous speech. Information is correlated to National Standards for History, Civics and Government, Common Core State Standards, and College and Career Readiness Standards.

tag(s): black history (98), civil rights (169), civil war (128), women (107)

In the Classroom

Take advantage of this free lesson to introduce students to Sojourner Truth, Civil Rights, or Women's Rights. Share the lesson into your Google Classroom account using the provided link. Extend this lesson using technology to motivate and engage students as they learn more about each topic. Create an entire unit that includes this lesson within Actively Learn, reviewed here. Include links to additional online resources, have students take notes, and include assessments all within the Actively Learn framework. Use the many resources found at ReadWriteThink, reviewed here, to help students organize and share information. For example, use the Bio Cube with students to organize biographical information on Sojourner Truth or have students use the Comic Creator to tell the story of Sojourner Truth. For a complete multimedia presentation, ask students to use Book Creator, reviewed here, to share their information about Women's Rights. Book Creator offers a variety of options to include in the digital books such as video, images, audio, and more.
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Mary McLeod Bethune - Learning for Justice

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6 to 12
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Using an excerpt from an interview of Mary McLeod Bethune, this lesson guides students through an exploration of Bethune's life and comparisons to their life experiences. Through the...more
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Using an excerpt from an interview of Mary McLeod Bethune, this lesson guides students through an exploration of Bethune's life and comparisons to their life experiences. Through the use of the provided list of essential questions, students use critical reading skills to build knowledge and make connections. This lesson also includes additional extension activities and prompts.

tag(s): black history (98), civil rights (169), women (107)

In the Classroom

Use the provided link to import this lesson into your Google Classroom account. This lesson is part of a four-part series, use the other lessons to build your unit on black history or famous women. As you add additional resources to your lesson, enhance student learning by using Fiskkit, reviewed here, as a collaborative discussion tool. Fiskkit includes tools for highlighting and adding notes to online articles to facilitate peer discussions. Further, enhance learning by helping students highlight important information from within articles using a word cloud creation tool like Wordsift, reviewed here. Copy and paste any text into Wordsift to highlight and enlarge frequently used words. Use this information to guide students toward significant portions of text. Ask students to use a digital annotation tool such as ThingLink, reviewed here, to add notes, links, and additional information to images. Extend student learning by encouraging them to learn more about Mary McLeod Bethune and other feminists and then creating and sharing podcasts. One easy introduction to podcasts is through the use of Acast, reviewed here. Have students use Acast to give a "You Are There" presentation sharing events as they happened during Bethune's life, or to share their takeaways of the importance of Mary McLeod Bethune's contributions to women's rights.
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Reading Trek: Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad - TeachersFirst

Grades
5 to 9
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TeachersFirst Reading Treks create a virtual field trip of resources about a piece of literature or text using the My Maps feature of Google Maps. This Reading Trek provides inspiration...more
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TeachersFirst Reading Treks create a virtual field trip of resources about a piece of literature or text using the My Maps feature of Google Maps. This Reading Trek provides inspiration and suggestions for using the trade book Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad. Did you know Harriet Tubman was a nurse, a Union spy, and a women's sufferage supporter? Read about her life in this highly informative book, and use our robust Instructional Guide with students in grades 5-9. Content correlates to Common Core Standards, ISTE Student Standards, and National Curriculum Standards for Social Studies. Find the entire selection of Reading Treks here.

tag(s): black history (98), civil rights (169), civil war (128), commoncore (79), underground railroad (10)

In the Classroom

Take advantage of the many suggested classroom uses for this resource found on the Instructional Guide (PDF). Consider using the historical information and primary sources from the book to have students create timelines of the important events during a period in Tubman's life. Find a variety of free online timeline creation tools located here. Using the map and locales, trace and then calculate distances for some of Tubman's rescues, missions, and places she lived. Use Google My Maps, reviewed here, to create and share custom maps.
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Teachers Righting History - Rosie Rios

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5 to 12
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This educational project developed by a former Treasurer of the United States offers a database highlighting historic American women. During her time as Treasurer, Rosie Rios sought...more
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This educational project developed by a former Treasurer of the United States offers a database highlighting historic American women. During her time as Treasurer, Rosie Rios sought input from around the country as part of her efforts to put a woman on U.S. currency. After leaving her office, she developed this site to share the database of information and encourage classrooms around the country to recognize contributions of American women to history. Download the database as a PDF document containing a list of women shared with the treasury and including date of birth, date of death, a one-sentence synopsis, and an image. Also, Teachers Righting History provides a few suggestions for getting started and using the database in classrooms.

tag(s): biographies (90), currency (14), women (107)

In the Classroom

Download and share the database provided on the site as a starting point for many different history projects. Enhance student learning and begin your project by having students choose a famous woman and personalizing a dollar bill with her image using Festisite Money, reviewed here. As students continue researching famous women, share our TeachersFirst Women's History Month Resources womenshistorymonth.cfm ">located here, as a starting point for finding information. Instead of just creating a list of online resources for student research, engage students by creating interactive learning activities using a tool like InsertLearning, reviewed here. InsertLearning is a Chrome browser extension that allows you to highlight, add comments, and add sticky notes including video to any web page. Students reply directly within the page and add their own notes. As a final project, enhance learning by asking students to use a timeline tool like History in Motion, reviewed here to share information about their research and add context with other historical events of the time.

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#ThisIs18 Around the World - New York Times

Grades
9 to 12
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#ThisIs18 is an interactive photo essay from the New York Times that shares images of everyday life for 18-year-old girls around the world. Pictures and interviews conducted by young...more
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#ThisIs18 is an interactive photo essay from the New York Times that shares images of everyday life for 18-year-old girls around the world. Pictures and interviews conducted by young women accompanied by professional mentors produce the content shared in this interactive. A look at girls' lives across 15 languages including 21 subjects providing an insightful snapshot into their everyday life across the globe.

tag(s): cross cultural understanding (151), cultures (106), women (107)

In the Classroom

Be sure to allow some time for students to explore all of the information shared in this incredible interactive. After students have looked through this site on their own, take a deeper look together by displaying the site on your interactive whiteboard and discussing together as a class. Have student share the portions that had the deepest impact on them, compare and contrast their everyday life to those in the interactive, and define topics for further exploration. Use this site as a starting point for a biography project or unit on cultures within your school or community. One great resource for starting a biography and enhancing student learning is the Cube Creator, reviewed here. Instead of just using written notes, extend students' learning by challenging them to take audio recordings of interviews using Vocaroo, reviewed here. Use #ThisIs18 as a model to create your own interactive sharing student interviews and biographies. Sway, reviewed here, is an excellent multimedia tool to enhance learning and for publishing and sharing content. Include audio and video interviews, student writing, and more to create your storytelling project.

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Women with Altitude - NetFlights

Grades
6 to 12
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Discover the stories of women achieving aviation firsts through this interactive timeline. The timeline begins with the first women to receive a pilot's license, Hilda Hewlett, Harriet...more
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Discover the stories of women achieving aviation firsts through this interactive timeline. The timeline begins with the first women to receive a pilot's license, Hilda Hewlett, Harriet Quimby, and Raymonde De Laroche in 1910 and continues through present time. Each entry shares an image and short presentation on the individual woman's accomplishment in aviation.

tag(s): aviation (32), biographies (90), flight (30), pioneers (8), women (107)

In the Classroom

Share this timeline when studying pioneers in different fields or include in Women's History Month lessons. Each entry provides a short introduction to the featured woman. Challenge students to use the entry as a starting point to research the aviator more fully. Have students save their resources using a bookmarking tool like Papaly, reviewed here, and include a link to their resources with the final project. Papaly allows you to collaborate and add notes to bookmarks making this a useful tool for use with group projects. Replace paper and pen timelines by asking students to create their own timelines exploring the life of a famous pioneer using History in Motion, reviewed here.

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National Cowboy Museum - Online Unit Studies - National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum

Grades
3 to 8
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Learn about the exploration and pioneers of the American West through several online unit studies for middle school students in PDF format. Scroll down the page to find "Emigrants...more
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Learn about the exploration and pioneers of the American West through several online unit studies for middle school students in PDF format. Scroll down the page to find "Emigrants Crossing the Plains" utilizes the paintings of Albert Bierstadt created during his journeys along the Oregon Trail. "End of the Trail" focuses on the sculptures of James Earle Fraser depicting spiritual representations of Native Americans. Madonnas of the Prairie: Depictions of Women in the American West is found under Previous Exhibits Educations Guide and features works focusing on women in the late 19th century to the early 20th century. Each unit includes an introduction, discussion questions, and teaching activities. There are many more unit studies to investigate. Also check out Collection Highlights from the top menu, scroll down and find many works of art; scroll over the art to get the title then click the image to find more information about many topics from the old west.

tag(s): art history (80), artists (75), native americans (81), westward expansion (35)

In the Classroom

Add these teaching units to your current resources for teaching about westward expansion of America, Native Americans, the 1800's, or explorers. Have all students research and discuss other artwork depicting American expansion, ask them to use Padlet, reviewed here, to organize and curate their saved resources. Ask your more tech-savvy students to build a timeline of events based on westward expansion or Native Americans using Timeline Inforgraphic Templates, reviewed here, or choose from other timeline creation tools located here. Include images, web links, and videos to create interactive timelines. Use the "Wandering Western Chest" links as a starter to creating your own Western Chest. Include books, artifacts, drawings, and more and share as an introduction to your western unit.
 This resource requires PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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What So Proudly We Hail - University of Pennsylvania, Amy Kass, and Leon Kass

Grades
K to 12
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What So Proudly We Hail offers several free, interesting civics resources and lessons based on short stories, songs, and speeches. Choosing the Curriculum link on the top menu will...more
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What So Proudly We Hail offers several free, interesting civics resources and lessons based on short stories, songs, and speeches. Choosing the Curriculum link on the top menu will give you access to units such as The Meaning of America, Songs for Free Men and Women, Lincoln and the Constitution and a others. Each unit has several "sessions," a Curriculum Overview, a Discussion Guide, and some with links to video clips and music or pertinent information about the topic. Click the library tab at the top to find many famous early Americans Authors, Videos, Texts, Study Guides, Songs, and Art.

tag(s): branches of government (57), constitution (85), environment (221), ethics (23), immigration (61), primary sources (101)

In the Classroom

Take advantage of the many resources on this site for use with civics lessons, Constitution Day activities, and teaching about primary resources. Share documents found on this site on your interactive whiteboard and use the tools found in your software to highlight and explore specific parts of any document. Alternatively, enhance student learning and classroom technology use by having students use Edji, reviewed here, to highlight and comment on the document. Instead of reading documents in class, have students use an online voice recording tool like Vocaroo, reviewed here, to share important portions on your class website. Have students create an annotated image sharing information about primary sources or civics lessons including text boxes and related links using a tool such as Thinglink, reviewed here. Instead of writing a book report, extend student learning and transform classroom technology use by asking students to create an animated video slide show using a tool like Powtoon, reviewed here, to recreate or discuss historical events.
 This resource requires PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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Famous Mathematicians - Brittany Hoffman

Grades
7 to 12
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What do Archimedes, Pythagoras, and Srinivasa Ramanujan have in common? They all enjoy a spot on this site of famous mathematicians. Begin with an overview of mathematics over time...more
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What do Archimedes, Pythagoras, and Srinivasa Ramanujan have in common? They all enjoy a spot on this site of famous mathematicians. Begin with an overview of mathematics over time starting with Thales of Miletus from 624-546 BC through Andrew Wiles' solving Fermat's Last Theorem in 1994 on the site's homepage. Learn about different mathematicians by choosing from the alphabetical list (alphabetized by first names) found on each page. Also worth exploring is the site's blog featuring groups of 15 famous mathematicians by different categories including women and Greek mathematicians.

tag(s): biographies (90), famous people (20), pythagorean theorem (21)

In the Classroom

Although this site doesn't have a lot of bells and whistles, it contains a great deal of historic and biographical information on famous (and perhaps, not so famous) mathematicians. Bookmark the site to use as a resource for a mathematician of the week to feature in your classroom. Choose a student to share information on the mathematician of their choice with classmates through a multimedia presentation using Lucid Press, reviewed here. Challenge students to develop a fake social media presence about one of the mathematicians using Fakebook, reviewed here, or the Twitter Fictional Account Template, reviewed here.

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