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Centuries of Citizenship: A Constitutional Timeline - National Constitution Center

Grades
5 to 12
3 Favorites 0  Comments
  
This interactive timeline is a historical experience that explains the key events of the U.S. Constitution. The events begin with the Magna Carta in 1215 and continue to 2009. Use ...more
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This interactive timeline is a historical experience that explains the key events of the U.S. Constitution. The events begin with the Magna Carta in 1215 and continue to 2009. Use the broadband interactive timeline to give your students the ultimate experience. Students can explore primary documents, view maps and graphs, hear audio clips, listen to debates, read pertinent stories in the New York Times, and learn who had the right to vote during specific time periods. Be sure to also visit the Interactive Constitution. Search the Constitution by keywords, topics, or court cases. This website is definitely worth the visit!

tag(s): bill of rights (27), constitution (92)

In the Classroom

Use this website to engage your students to learn more about different eras of U.S. History. Challenge students to debate the issues found in "Point Counterpoint." Use the primary sources to discuss relevant historical issues or how the problems presented might be found in current events. Use the interactive U.S. Constitution to help with your Constitution Day activities. A link to a PDF file of the entire U.S. Constitution is available. Have students create a multimedia presentation using Thinglink, reviewed here. Thinglink allows you to narrate a picture and add multimedia. Challenge students to find a photo (legally permitted to be reproduced), and then narrate the photo as if it is a news report about the U.S. Constitution. Thinglink can be used for a variety of assignments in any classroom that is integrating technology as an enhancement, modification, or transformation
  This resource requires Adobe Flash and PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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