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Read Theory - Read Theory (Tanner)

Grades
2 to 12
5 Favorites 0  Comments
Read Theory offers over 1,000 interactive reading comprehension exercises. Learn to think critically, draw inferences, understand the scope and global concepts, find or recall details,...more
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Read Theory offers over 1,000 interactive reading comprehension exercises. Learn to think critically, draw inferences, understand the scope and global concepts, find or recall details, and infer meanings of vocabulary words. Get detailed reports to track and analyze progress using percentages, bar graphs, and tables. Sign up with an email and be sure to know your reading level. Then it is simple: Read the passage, take a quiz, and see answers and explanations after finishing the quiz. If you are unsure of the appropriate reading level, visit a reading assessment site. Try Literably, reviewed here, to assess oral reading comprehension or News in Levels (use Test Your Level of English), reviewed here.

tag(s): differentiation (63), guided reading (37), Online Learning (29), reading comprehension (121), remote learning (44)

In the Classroom

Take your students to the next level in their reading and reading skills! Sign up students yourself (assigning a password and username). Students can sign up for themselves if they have an email (and school policies permit). The first task is to provide the reading level. Use this site to differentiate reading levels for your students. Use this tool in a blended learning or remote learning classroom so students can have time to read at their own pace, or set up a learning center for use during your L.A. block. This will allow you one-on-one time to begin the program. In a learning support or remedial reading class, especially at upper levels where "reading" is no longer a regular subject, this tool will allow students some autonomy in improving their skills. It will also let them see progress. Discuss with individual students the questions they answered, where the answer was in the reading, etc. Be certain to save this site in your class favorites and list it on your class website for students to access both in and out of the classroom. If students cannot have their own email accounts, consider using a "class set" of Gmail subaccounts, explained here; this tells how to set up Gmail subaccounts to use for any online membership service. Using Gmail subaccounts will provide anonymous interaction within your class.

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