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It's Okay To Be Smart YouTube Channel - Joe Hanson

Grades
6 to 12
0 Favorites 0  Comments
  
This YouTube Channel contains videos based on the PBS Series of the same name. You can also view the It's Okay To Be Smart blog reviewed here. New...more
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This YouTube Channel contains videos based on the PBS Series of the same name. You can also view the It's Okay To Be Smart blog reviewed here. New videos are uploaded weekly with titles such as "Why Seasons Make No Sense" and "How Big is the Solar System?" Most videos are under 10 minutes in length making them perfect for quick but meaningful lessons. Be sure to check out playlists with videos sorted by topics including physics, earth, and more. If your district blocks YouTube, then they may not be viewable. You could always view the videos at home and bring them to class "on a stick" to share. Use a tool such as Online-Convert, reviewed here, to download the videos from YouTube.
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tag(s): animals (323), climate change (75), earth (226), endangered species (40), energy (213), evolution (106), food chains (26), human body (132), space (232), video (265)

In the Classroom

Flip your classroom and use a video as homework. Have students take notes on the material and write down questions they still have and topics that confuse them. They can do this with pen and paper or online. If you want the assignment online, explain to students they need to open a new tab in their browser window and take notes with a tool such as Webnote, reviewed here; tell students to be sure to save the URL to share their notes and questions with you and their peers. Or you could use a tool like EdPuzzle, reviewed here, for students to pause videos and ask or answer questions right on the video. These activities can uncover misconceptions. Show the video to the class, and then discuss the concept at length. To share a single video from this site without all the YouTube clutter, use a tool such as View Pure, reviewed here, and create a shortcut to the View Pure page directly on the desktop. For more advanced classes, provide time for students to choose a video to view and research the underlying concept.

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