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Talking About Race and Privilege: Lesson Plan for Middle and High School Students - National Association of School Psychologists (NASP)

Grades
6 to 12
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This lesson plan guides students toward defining the concept of "privilege" and to identify examples of "privilege" in their lives. The lesson begins with using the Webster's Dictionary...more
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This lesson plan guides students toward defining the concept of "privilege" and to identify examples of "privilege" in their lives. The lesson begins with using the Webster's Dictionary definition of "privilege" and then leads to historical perspectives on "privilege" related to race in the United States. Another component of the lesson is the use of the Privilege Aptitude Test adapted from the National Civil Rights Museum at the Lorraine Motel with follow-up reflection questions. Use the link to print or download the lesson in PDF format.

tag(s): civil rights (142), psychology (66), racism (40)

In the Classroom

Include this lesson plan with your other resources when teaching lessons on racism and social injustice, either in-person or through remote or blended learning situations. Instead of using paper charts as mentioned in the lesson, use a digital chart creation resource such as Lucidchart, reviewed here, to create collaborative digital workspaces. Lucidchart includes several features that expand learning through the use of commenting, real-time collaboration, and colorful visual displays. Guide students in how to think through reflection questions using topics available in Thinkalong, reviewed here. Thinkalong offers an interactive multimedia format that guides students through investigations that lead them to contemplate possible solutions to serious problems.
 This resource requires PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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