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Wild Earth - wildearth media ltd.

Grades
K to 12
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Wish you could join a live safari? With Wild Earth, view live broadcasts twice daily. Video originates from Djuma Game Reserve in South Africa. Each morning and afternoon, follow...more
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Wish you could join a live safari? With Wild Earth, view live broadcasts twice daily. Video originates from Djuma Game Reserve in South Africa. Each morning and afternoon, follow along on a live Safari with one of the Wild Earth rangers. View the passion of the Wild Earth creators as they share their unbelievable footage live to a global audience. View the nature of Africa unaltered and in its natural state. Learn about the different kinds of animals and the schedule for times of Safaris and other events. Past videos are viewed in the archive.

tag(s): africa (135), animals (260)

In the Classroom

Use the Wild Earth Channel to identify behavior patterns in animals, interactions between animals and people, or to compare actual behavior of animals vs. what students may have read in the past. Have students create artwork, stories, or poems about animals viewed on Wild Earth. Even first graders can "observe" and keep a science notebook of their observations as you set this site up on your classroom computer for daily observation times. Have students make interactive stories or a class science notebook using a tool such as Bookemon ,reviewed here. Or view the WildEarthtv archives and create a time line for the various animals. Create an interactive timeline using a resource such as Sutori, reviewed here, that can include images, text, and collaboration. Identify when certain repeated activities take place in the preserve and how animals differ in their time lines. Compare the daily/weekly patterns of humans to the patterns of animals.

Be sure to include this link on your teacher web page for students to access outside school hours! They may want to share the African experience at home, as well.

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