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Reading Like a Historian - Stanford History Education Group

Grades
6 to 12
6 Favorites 0  Comments
 
The Reading Like a Historian curriculum engages you in historical inquiry. Each of the 75 lessons revolves around a central historical question. Each lesson features sets of...more
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The Reading Like a Historian curriculum engages you in historical inquiry. Each of the 75 lessons revolves around a central historical question. Each lesson features sets of primary documents modified for groups of students with diverse reading skills and abilities. This curriculum teaches students how to investigate historical questions employing reading strategies such as sourcing, contextualizing, corroborating, and more. Instead of memorizing historical facts, students evaluate the trustworthiness of multiple perspectives on issues from King Philip's War to the Montgomery Bus Boycott (and more). Next, they make historical claims backed by documentary evidence. Choose from the units menu to find lessons divided into 12 units: introduction through the Cold War Culture/Civil Rights. Read a short overview, then choose from the list of included lessons. Most lessons are in PDF format and may include PowerPoint presentations with additional images and/or maps to use with the lesson.

tag(s): american revolution (86), civil rights (117), civil war (145), cold war (29), colonial america (107), colonization (16), emancipation proclamation (12), new deal (6), slavery (72), world war 1 (53), world war 2 (141)

In the Classroom

Bookmark and save this site as a resource for American history lessons throughout the year. The final segment of each lesson, the "Central Historical Question," has been noted as the most important part. If you don't have time for the full lesson, incorporate the historical question into your lesson plans as part of your classroom discussion, or journal activities. Perhaps you can use it as an essential question for your unit. Challenge students to create a talking avatar using a photo or other image (legally permitted to be reproduced). The avatars can be used to explain the central historical question. Use a site such as Blabberize (reviewed here).
 This resource requires PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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