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SETI Institute - SETI

Grades
8 to 12
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Looking to excite your students about space and its possibilities for life? Want to push them to think beyond their own imaginations? Try having them listen to a radio program ...more
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Looking to excite your students about space and its possibilities for life? Want to push them to think beyond their own imaginations? Try having them listen to a radio program from SETI (Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence). For the skeptics, the site is partially sponsored by NASA's Astrobiology division. However, this is not about teaching students that there is life or "aliens" out there, but rather to open their minds to some possibility thinking. Don't miss the "Archives" link where you find mind countless topics of interest.

tag(s): brain (71), cells (104), geology (83)

In the Classroom

Try adding a this link to your website or wiki. Assign students to listen to it on their own time and start an online discussion of extraterrestial life and what it could look like, etc. Create a class wiki for students to share their online discussions. Not comfortable with wikis? Have no wiki worries - check out the TeachersFirst's Wiki Walk-Through. Have cooperative learning groups investigate a topic at this site and create a multimedia presentation. Have your students create an interactive online poster using Lucidpress, reviewed here.

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Miami Museum of Science - The pH Factor - Miami Museum of Science

Grades
3 to 8
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The pH factor website is designed to help students in elementary school and middle school better understand the concept of pH. Links include Excite, Explore, Explain, Expand, Extend,...more
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The pH factor website is designed to help students in elementary school and middle school better understand the concept of pH. Links include Excite, Explore, Explain, Expand, Extend, Exchange, and Examine. Some links offer pictures with descriptions, other link to articles from the New York Times, and some include assessments. There is a helpful teacher's guide, lesson plans, activities, and links to related readings and extension ideas. The information is clear and easy to understand. The laboratory activities are easy to follow and show pictures of different process steps.

tag(s): acids and bases (11), ph (4)

In the Classroom

With elementary age students, try introducing an activity with pH during environmental science units on acid rain or during pre-chemistry type units. Show students the instructions for a laboratory on an interactive whiteboard or projector. Have students work in small groups to complete the experiment step by step.

Viewing the New York Times articles requires a log-in. Registration requires a valid email address. Tip: rather than using your personal or work email, create a free Gmail account to use for memberships. If you plan to have students register individually, you may want to create your own Gmail account with up to 20 subaccounts for each group of students (by code name or number) within your classes. Here is a blog post that tells how to set up GMail subaccounts to use for any online membership service.

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Explore the Night Sky Simulator - Physic.org

Grades
5 to 12
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Struggling to find a way to teach astronomy during the day in the classroom? This night sky simulator is a great option to assigning star gazing as homework. This way ...more
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Struggling to find a way to teach astronomy during the day in the classroom? This night sky simulator is a great option to assigning star gazing as homework. This way you can ensure that your students are viewing accurate representations of the night sky. The best way to run this in class is to leave the lights off and make the room as dark as possible. The simulation is easy to interact with as it has onscreen instructions. The sky is a simulation of the sky over different parts of the United Kingdom. Of course you will want to ask your students on other continents how it may differ from the sky they see! Note: This site may take more than a few second to load. Be patient.

tag(s): planets (126), solar system (123), space (214)

In the Classroom

Have students use this simulation to discuss points such as light pollution and constellations. Try having students compare three different locations, taking screen shots of each location. Then, have them put the pictures into a single document or slide and have them make comparisons. Have students use an online tool to compare the locations such as the Interactive Three Circle Venn Diagram (reviewed here). Students can hypothesis as to the causes of differences by investigating the geography, climate, and populations of the area that they are observing.
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Homemade Thermometers - CSIRO - Double Helix Club

Grades
6 to 10
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This do - it - yourself activity from the wonderful folks at CSIRO's Double Helix Club, is a neat way to have students think about how a thermometer works. Many ...more
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This do - it - yourself activity from the wonderful folks at CSIRO's Double Helix Club, is a neat way to have students think about how a thermometer works. Many time we just expect that they understand these things, just like using a calculator, there is a process to understanding how a thermometer works. This activity has students create their own thermometer with everyday, reusable materials.

tag(s): temperature (31)

In the Classroom

Assemble the materials for this activity. Print basic instructions. Talk to students about liquid expansion and contraction using everyday situations such as water freezing in the sidewalk and creating cracks. Discuss how water is different from most liquids in that most expand as they are heated.

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WaterWorks - Investigating Fountains - OMSI

Grades
4 to 8
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This site provides six different activities to investigate how water moves. Investigations featured here are simple and cheap to construct. The activities are very open ended and could...more
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This site provides six different activities to investigate how water moves. Investigations featured here are simple and cheap to construct. The activities are very open ended and could be adapted, with good questioning to just about any level. The last link on the page offers two videos with real life applications of the student investigations. This makes for a great inquiry activity.

tag(s): experiments (73), water (130)

In the Classroom

This would fit nicely into a unit on water movement or basic physics. Have students conduct experiments and then debrief by asking why and how the water reacted the way that it did. Have students work in cooperative learning groups and take digital photos throughout their experiment. Then have students narrate the pictures explaining what happened during their experiments. Use a site such as ThingLink, reviewed here, to have students narrate their pictures.
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Adverputt - dampgnat.com

Grades
7 to 12
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Looking for a way to actively engage your students in learning physics? Adverputt is a challenging game website, however with a solid constructive approach, you can turn this activity...more
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Looking for a way to actively engage your students in learning physics? Adverputt is a challenging game website, however with a solid constructive approach, you can turn this activity into an extremely fun and challenging learning experience. One recommendation if you choose to let students use this in class on their own, have them mute the sound or use their ear buds. This site can hold hours of challenging thinking!

tag(s): motion (62), newton (26)

In the Classroom

To use this site constructively and to have students learn through exploration, try introducing the site on the interactive whiteboard or projector. Have students look at the course and discuss if and why miniature golf is an application of Newton's laws. Review Newton's laws. Show students how to make different angled shots and different strength of shots. Then, have students discuss how many strokes each hole should take according to Newton's Laws. Have students discuss how they could use the laws to play the best possible game of miniature golf. Once you allow the students to work on this on their own computer, have them take screen shots with jing (reviewed here), and have them type their reasoning for why the shot worked or did not work. Once students have had the chance to work with the program, an independent assignment could be created where students use Google sketchup explained hereor another online drawing program to create holes of their own. With this, have students create three holes one for each law or have them create holes that are impossible according to Newton's laws. Also have students discuss real miniature golf and why the action and reaction situations may be different in real life.
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Wind Power Interactive - Harness the Power of Wind - National Geographic

Grades
6 to 10
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"Harness the Power of Wind" (created by National Geographic) is an interactive tool that allows you to create your own wind farm. This application goes beyond a basic interactive by...more
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"Harness the Power of Wind" (created by National Geographic) is an interactive tool that allows you to create your own wind farm. This application goes beyond a basic interactive by explaining in text the different parts of a wind turbine, the different variables that affect the usefulness of a wind turbine, and it shows diagrams of how those variables affect a turbine. The interactive can be adjusted as it is running so that you can see what small adjustments can make to overall power production. There is also a related National Geographic feature on wind power linked on the bottom of the page. This would make for great pre-reading or follow up materials to using this interactive. This site does include some minor advertisements by National Geographic.

tag(s): energy (202), environment (318)

In the Classroom

This interactive could be used in beginning level physics courses as a homework assignment posted to the class website (or blog) to reinforce the concepts of power and wind energy. Better perhaps, this could be used in environmental science classes about alternative sources of energy. Have students work with the interactive on their own computers, give them time to "play" with the interactive for about 5 minutes. Then, challenge them to create the most power with the least speed of wind or the most power with the smallest turbine radius. Ask students questions such as "Does making the radius of the turbine smaller have a positive or negative affect on power production? Why? How does wind speed affect power production? Is it logical to always have winds at fifty miles per hour? How does altitude affect wind power production? What is an ideal altitude for wind power production?" After discussing these question, have student pose some "why" questions of their own. They can then use a search engine such as Wolfram or even Google to find their own answers to share with the class. Have students share their questions, research, and findings on a class wiki. Not comfortable with wikis? Have no wiki worries - check out the TeachersFirst's Wiki Walk-Through.
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Sixty symbols - The University of Nottingham

Grades
9 to 12
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Find excellent videos about a variety of physics and astronomy topics with this great site. Choose a symbol and view the video that explains and depicts the meaning of the ...more
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Find excellent videos about a variety of physics and astronomy topics with this great site. Choose a symbol and view the video that explains and depicts the meaning of the symbol. View a variety from total solar eclipse to pressure and vacuums to magnetic susceptibility. Videos are hosted on You Tube. Schools that have this resource blocked will need to ask for it to be unblocked to use in class. Click on planets to view great videos of each of those in our solar system. View information on scientists and the sixty symbols project by clicking on the tabs across the top.

Caution: Be sure to preview the videos before sharing them with your students. Our editors found one that included alcohol in the experiment, all others appeared appropriate.

tag(s): magnetism (38), motion (62)

In the Classroom

The videos are hosted on You Tube. If your district blocks You Tube, then they may not be viewable. You could always view that at home and bring them to class "on a stick" to share. Use a tool such as KeepVid reviewed here to download the videos from YouTube.

Use on a whiteboard or projector for the entire class to see if You Tube is blocked for student but not for teachers. Assign the viewing of a specific video as a homework assignment. Have students take notes on the topic for further discussion in class or to apply the information to laboratory activities or demonstrations in class. Encourage students to follow these clever videos to develop their own videos for teaching concepts to other students in and out of their school. Challenge students to create a video and share using a site such as SchoolTube (reviewed here).
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Chromoscope - Cardiff University

Grades
7 to 12
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Use chromoscope to identify what types of materials (stars, etc) are visible at various wavelengths. View the universe through a range of wavelengths from gamma rays to radio waves....more
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Use chromoscope to identify what types of materials (stars, etc) are visible at various wavelengths. View the universe through a range of wavelengths from gamma rays to radio waves. Move the slider in the upper right to change between the different wavelengths. Use the help feature in the lower part of the screen or the quick video tour before you start. Double click on an area of space to zoom in further. Move around the map by using the mouse. Use the "L" key to turn labels on and off. Turning on labels in the Visible spectrum causes a labeling of constellations. View what is visible at each wavelength. Chromoscope uses public domain data sets to create the interface. Chromoscope can be downloaded to your computer and run without being connected to the Internet.

tag(s): light (49), space (214), waves (24)

In the Classroom

Use chromoscope to help students understand more about the science of space and light. Have students determine what they know about the different types of wavelengths presented. Share this site on your interactive whiteboard or projector. If individual computers are available, have students explore independently. Brainstorm this information and create a mind map (using diagrammr reviewed here) of the information and how they are related to one another. Identify the level of energy and length of the wavelength through these discussions. Many students have some knowledge of each of these wavelengths and can really learn more when they see it pulled together.

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How Stuff Works - Howstuffworks, Inc.

Grades
4 to 8
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Find answers to the most curious questions that students ask on this great site. Search the site for your topic of interest such as how cars work, what makes a ...more
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Find answers to the most curious questions that students ask on this great site. Search the site for your topic of interest such as how cars work, what makes a refrigerator cold, or how construction has changed and the materials that are used. Articles provides diagrams, text, videos, images, and a range of other resources to show a curious student what makes something tick. The site's explanations are a great resource for "kitchen science" projects, for getting budding inventors started, or for providing added explanations of how things work the way they do. Click on the topics in the blue top panel for the various subjects such as Adventure, Animals, and Autos through Money, Science, and Tech. Can't find your answer? Ask under the "Keep Asking" section and it may become the question of the week. Sign up for the monthly newsletter. Search the other areas of the site such as "Games," "Quizzes," and "Pics and Puzzles." Find great podcasts and blogs and be sure to check out the "Random Zone." Find images, lists, and raqndom facts here. Scroll to the bottom to find fun facts, trivia, and even a poll of the day! Ignore the advertising; the site content is worth it.

In the Classroom

Use this site as an "activator" to introduce a new science unit or lesson on a projector. It could also be a great way to introduce informational speeches/videos and how to write them. The videos on earth and life science topics provide a great launch pad for further class discussions. Participate in the poll of the day. Use the trivia and facts section for interesting ways to get kids thinking in class. Use this site for students to "show and tell" something they have learned. Use the information presented here to better understand how science is applied in our everyday lives. This activity would work well for individual or pairs of students in a lab or on laptops. Introduce this site on your interactive whiteboard or projector. Then have students explore this site independently or in small groups. Ask your students to visit the site and create a multimedia presentation, video or podcast, article, or blog post from the information they learn there. Have students create commercials and share them using a tool such as SchoolTube reviewed here. Use this site as an anticipatory set or "activator" to introduce a unit or lesson on a projector or interactive whiteboard. Be sure to include this site on your class web page for students to access both in and outside of class.

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- Lessonopoly: Science of NFL Football - NBC Learn and National Science Foundation

Grades
5 to 10
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Find great videos featuring the best football players and trainers in the NFL to learn science through the lens of football. THis content was moved from its original home on ...more
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Find great videos featuring the best football players and trainers in the NFL to learn science through the lens of football. THis content was moved from its original home on Lessonopoly to hosting on Gooru. Open the folder to view lesson materials and videos. Choose various science topics such as "Vectors," "Nutrition, Hydration, and Health," and "Projectile Motion and Parabolas" to name a few. View a short video of the concept and click the links to other resources that can be used to learn more about that particular topic. Choose to view and print the lesson plans using a printer friendly option or download as a pdf. Find practice worksheets, teacher keys, quizzes, and other activities. Note that NBC Learn's own video site is usually a fee-based, but this particular collection, hosted on Gooru, is free.

tag(s): sports (97), vectors (25)

In the Classroom

Bring science to life with these great resources. Use the video to pique student interest in the topic and use the lesson plans to really understand the concept to apply to other areas. Use the vectors to understand how science and quarterback throws are related. Follow the lesson plan using the video and the activities. Follow up with actual football throws in the school yard. Measure distances and angles to create data to analyze as groups or a class. Consider creating your own video or slidecast of explanations using students as the stars of the show explaining the concept. Invite Math classes to use your data for their understanding of Vectors as well. Brainstorm other sports where this science concept is also used.
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60-second Science - Scientific American

Grades
5 to 12
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Find great 60-second science podcasts about a variety of topics on this site. Subscribe to an RSS or iTunes feed to receive the latest podcasts instantly. Listen to the podcasts ...more
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Find great 60-second science podcasts about a variety of topics on this site. Subscribe to an RSS or iTunes feed to receive the latest podcasts instantly. Listen to the podcasts directly on the site by clicking the play button. Download a single podcast by clicking the "Download" button. Be sure to scroll down the page and look for the section on Podcasts near the lower right. Click the links to view other 60 second podcasts such as "60-second Earth." There are too many topics to mention here. Check it out!

tag(s): listening (91)

In the Classroom

Use the 60 second podcasts as an opener in science or any other class. Share the podcasts on your interactive whiteboard or projector with speakers turned up or share them at a listening center using mp3 players. Use to introduce concepts or ideas, how understanding the concepts in the chapter help to understand a bigger problem, or to identify scientific processes. Allow students to choose individual podcasts to listen, research, understand, and present to the class. Consider creating this type of format in your classroom. Students create podcasts of various materials, lab activities, or items of interest which can be shared on a wiki, blog, or other site. Have students create podcasts using a site such as PodOmatic (reviewed here). Create a student review system of podcasts (easy when using a blog.) Assess students on their ability to explain through the podcast as well as answer questions about the underlying science afterwards.
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Learn 4 Good - Bridge Building Simulation - Learn 4 Good Networks

Grades
6 to 10
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This interactive, bridge building simulation is a hands-on way to learn about not only physics but also cost effective design. There are clear, on screen instructions that students...more
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This interactive, bridge building simulation is a hands-on way to learn about not only physics but also cost effective design. There are clear, on screen instructions that students can easily read and follow. Even better, if they do not read the instructions, they may learn even more by trial and error. It all depends on the instructor's level of comfort and time constraints for purposeful play. There are 8 levels of bridge building and the goal of the simulation is to build a sound bridge that little creatures can safely pass over a large chasm. The little creatures remind one of a little purple cartooned lemmings. The only frustration is that once you click a spot on the screen you are stuck with that decision. If you make the decision and you do not look at it, you have to start all over again to fix it. This takes a plain bridge building lab to the next level by adding technology and allowing for multiple attempts without wasting materials. Another neat feature of this simulation is that you can embed it on your own website.Be aware: there are some advertisements at this site.

tag(s): forces (46), gravity (50), structures (24)

In the Classroom

Use this simulation to reinforce physics concepts. Try it as a virtual lab in science class. Or have students design the blue print in class. Then have them print the screen and use the blue print to build an actual model bridge in class. Embed the simulation on your own website. This takes away the distraction of advertisements. It also directs students to one site rather than following a trail of links (avoiding temptations to click on other "arcade" games).
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Newton's Laws of Motion - School For Champions

Grades
8 to 12
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This site designed by School for Champions is a great introduction to the basics of Physics. One of the neatest features of this site, beyond its straightforward scientific information,...more
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This site designed by School for Champions is a great introduction to the basics of Physics. One of the neatest features of this site, beyond its straightforward scientific information, is that the information can be read to the students. The function is embedded in the site! This would be very helpful for learning support students and other vision impaired students.

tag(s): newton (26)

In the Classroom

Use this as an alternative to the textbook. Post the site to the class wiki and have students read or listen as part of homework and answer questions about the information. Even better, have students take the mini quiz at the end of the lessons and post their answers to the wiki. Not comfortable with wikis? Have no wiki worries - check out the TeachersFirst's Wiki Walk-Through.

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Green Revolution - National Science Foundation

Grades
4 to 12
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Join the Green Revolution! Choose videos that showcase the inventiveness, creativity, and passion of researchers and inventors who will be part of powering our future. At the time of...more
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Join the Green Revolution! Choose videos that showcase the inventiveness, creativity, and passion of researchers and inventors who will be part of powering our future. At the time of this review topics included: wind, solar, green roofs, microbes, city car, smart grid, and biomass. You are also able to embed videos into a wiki, site, or blog. Click "Print Educator Info" to download a PDF for use with classes. In the future, transcripts will also be available.

tag(s): conservation (125), environment (318)

In the Classroom

Use these videos as a great introduction to green energy and replacements to fossil fuels. Share the videos on your interactive whiteboard or projector. After showing a video, have students research the use of the various green energies around the country and the world. Research energy use and especially the difference between residential and commercial demand. Have cooperative learning groups view one of the videos and complete some basic research on the topic. Have the groups create a multimedia presentation to share their findings. Challenge students to narrate a picture using a tool such as ThingLink, reviewed here. Be sure your students check out the City Car. Research the various types of green designs on cars to find the advantages and disadvantages of each. Great discussions, projects, and research are all possible through use of these videos.
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Calculator Soup - Edward Furey and Southborough Website Design

Grades
K to 12
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Calculator Soup collects all sorts of online calculators in one free site. Calculators range from basic to complicated and have specific functions like conversion, time, finance, and...more
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Calculator Soup collects all sorts of online calculators in one free site. Calculators range from basic to complicated and have specific functions like conversion, time, finance, and chemistry. A great tool for students who do not have specific calculators or forget them.

tag(s): calculators (41)

In the Classroom

Find exactly the calculator you need for students to operate on the interactive whiteboard or at computers. As an enrichment project, have students select a calculator and design problems to use it. Students can share their problems with classmates and be exposed to various types of math problems and calculators. Challenge students to create a video to "advertise" a certain calculator and share using a site such as SchoolTube (reviewed here).

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Kids Science Experiments - Kids Science Experiments

Grades
3 to 8
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This site provides kid friendly science experiments for categories ranging from electricity to plants and flowers. Specific topic examples include gravity, absorption, pressure, reactions,...more
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This site provides kid friendly science experiments for categories ranging from electricity to plants and flowers. Specific topic examples include gravity, absorption, pressure, reactions, matter, properties, heat, magnetism, and many others. Although this site is rather "plain vanilla," it does offer a lot of great ideas to get you started! Check out the sections entitled science facts and science dictionary.

tag(s): experiments (73)

In the Classroom

Ask your students to create a lesson or presentation based on an experiment listed on the site. Have cooperative learning groups create online books using a tool such as Bookemon, reviewed here. Students can become teachers and lead the class through a simple experiment. Each concept area offers choices of appropriate experiments, so different groups can try different experiments to "teach" a concept. This site would make an excellent resource for finding hands on activities to support curriculum.

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52 Totally Awesome Science Experiments - Phlebotomy Technician Schools

Grades
4 to 12
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Looking for cool science experiments for school or home? Find great ones on this surprising site. Read short descriptions of the resource and find more detailed information by clicking...more
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Looking for cool science experiments for school or home? Find great ones on this surprising site. Read short descriptions of the resource and find more detailed information by clicking through to the linked site. Some of the experiments include interactives, video clips, and more. Advise students that ads or other links can appear along the bottom and they should not click on these.

tag(s): density (21), sun (73), volcanoes (65)

In the Classroom

Find great inspiration for class demonstrations that can also be performed by students in teaching others about concepts. For example, find great ideas for making your own volcano, tsunami, or finding out how much sugar is in a can of soda. Follow up these experiments with discussion of the impact on the lives of students, society or resources. Create awareness campaigns of natural disasters, effects of resources and foods on health, etc. Have cooperative learning groups create an interactive online poster ("glog") using Glogster EDU, reviewed here.
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Science House - Video Science Experiments - Dan Menelly

Grades
3 to 12
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Looking for captivating science experiments and demonstrations? Use Science House's series of videos for inspiration. This is a great resource for ideas or wonderful ways to introduce...more
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Looking for captivating science experiments and demonstrations? Use Science House's series of videos for inspiration. This is a great resource for ideas or wonderful ways to introduce or reinforce concepts. While you are at the site, check out other videos such as those from scientists who are passionate about their careers (in the "Interviews" section.)

tag(s): careers (133), experiments (73)

In the Classroom

Use the videos as an inspiration for making or changing a student lab. Practice the experiments to use as a demonstration in your own classes. Show the demonstrations on your interactive whiteboard or projector as a beginning or ending to a lesson. Consider using these ideas to create your own set of science videos and science experiments created by the students in your class. Challenge students to create a video and share using a site such as SchoolTube (reviewed here).
 This resource requires Adobe Flash.

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Primary Resources: Science - RM

Grades
K to 6
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Are you looking for sources to enrich your science instruction? Primary Resources has an extensive science page full of experiments, handouts, presentations, vocabulary cards,...more
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Are you looking for sources to enrich your science instruction? Primary Resources has an extensive science page full of experiments, handouts, presentations, vocabulary cards, and even rubrics for student assessment. The broad range of categories includes scientific inquiry, life processes and living things, materials and their properties, and physical processes. These valuable resources come from teachers across the world. Contributions range from how to conduct a scientific investigation, SMART board lessons on how to separate mixtures of materials, to PowerPoint presentations on renewable and non-renewable forms of energy. Most activities include a key that indicates the appropriate age group, grade level, or required skill level needed as well as its file format. If you have some of your own scientific resources you treasure, feel free to contribute them to this site. On the left sidebar, you will find links to similar activities in nearly all subject areas: geography, art, history, math, English, welsh, music, and more.

tag(s): classification (25), electricity (89), environment (318)

In the Classroom

Celebrate spring by taking your class outside for a budding unit about plants. Primary Resources has slide shows that explain the parts of a flower, what seeds need to grow, how they germinate or explain photosynthesis. Are you preparing students for an upcoming science fair? Primary Resources is also a great source for finding experiments appropriate for primary age students and is helpful when introducing how to conduct an inquiry based science experiment. Interactive presentations demonstrate how to make predictions, form a hypothesis, develop a "fair test" and how to record test results. A few activities include tasks for an interactive whiteboard or projector and others provide handouts or reproducible activity pages.

There is a key that indicates the equivalent United States grade level. The British Key Stages are equivalent to the following age groups; KS 1 for ages five to six, KS 2 for ages seven to eleven, KS 3 for ages twelve to fourteen, and KS 4 for ages fifteen to sixteen. Since this site was created in the UK, so some of the pronunciations and spellings may differ from those in American English.
  This resource requires Adobe Flash and PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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