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Voice of America - Broadcasting Board of Governors

Grades
4 to 12
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Concerned about quality news? Voice of America's policy is to be a reliable and authoritative source of news. It claims accurate, objective, and comprehensive news reporting. It represents...more
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Concerned about quality news? Voice of America's policy is to be a reliable and authoritative source of news. It claims accurate, objective, and comprehensive news reporting. It represents all of America without more focus on some segments than others, providing balance in the news. Find the most recent and pressing news stories along the top. Search news stories divided by categories such as US, Africa, Asia, Americas, Europe, Middle East, Economy, Education, Arts and Entertainment, Health, Environment, and more. View interactive resources such as a You Tube channel, podcasts, webcasts, and newsletters.

tag(s): news (261)

In the Classroom

View news stories and compare them to similar stories in different news media. Discuss the differences and similarities of these stories and use a Venn diagram to portray. Try using the tool "Interactive Two Circle Venn Diagram" (reviewed here).

Discuss the focus of each article and reasons for the focus. Answer what the reporter is trying to convince and possible bias in various stories. Create an essay, letter, or blog post outlining viewpoints and linking these various sources for greater understanding of issues and how they are represented in the media. Have students share their letters or essays on a podcast using a tool such as (reviewed here).
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Playing History: Your Source for Historical Games - Trevor Owens and Jim Safley

Grades
3 to 12
9 Favorites 1  Comments
  
Playing History is a directory of free historical games, interactives, and simulations. There is a growing body of research about the value of educational games and this site...more
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Playing History is a directory of free historical games, interactives, and simulations. There is a growing body of research about the value of educational games and this site is a database for high quality games and simulations. You will find not only games for history, but for different cultural knowledge, too. This collaborative site currently has 132 humanities learning games and is growing monthly. You can suggest your own favorite humanities based games and simulations to be included in this collection. This site does not host these games. It is a sharing point for teachers/enthusiasts of history to recommend games and find them.

At this site the quality of the games varies from deep thinking to factual to cute. Learn everything from the history of dating to the geography of China to "Do I Have a Right?" exploring the Bill of Rights.

tag(s): cultures (105), supreme court (22)

In the Classroom

There is a wide variety of topics for the study of cultures and history here, so be sure to look through this site as you plan your new unit or lesson! There are many, many uses for this site in the class room: Share a game from this site on your interactive whiteboard or projector for a whole class review, choose a game from this website to use as a center, a review, or to provide a student reward on individual computers. Some of the games can be downloaded into a pdf and printed out and used as a traditional card, or board group game. Since this is a collaborative website, you and your students can "rate" the games to give feedback for other users.
 This resource requires Adobe Flash.

Comments

Oh MY GOSH! Who knew? This is a wealth of information available through game-playing. By searching the term "social justice," I arrived at numerous options for delving into the various aspects of a complex problem. I cannot wait to share this resource. Patricia, NJ, Grades: 6 - 12

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American Revolution - Teaching American History

Grades
6 to 12
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Take the American Revolution interactive! Quite simply, the site breaks down the American Revolution into three battle phases: 1775-1778, 1778-1781, and 1783/The Treaty of Paris. Click...more
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Take the American Revolution interactive! Quite simply, the site breaks down the American Revolution into three battle phases: 1775-1778, 1778-1781, and 1783/The Treaty of Paris. Click on one of the phases and you are lead through an interactive overview of the battles during that phase. Some of the information is simply displayed; other parts require a "Q&A" approach to work through the information. Each section also includes web links for further information. The Treaty of Paris section leads students through a demonstration of how the boundaries of the new country were drawn, and would be a good springboard for discussion about the further growth of the United States throughout its history. The graphics are clear, colorful and attractive, and the information is solid.

tag(s): american revolution (86), evolution (100), maps (287)

In the Classroom

This is one of these sites that is just so perfect for the interactive whiteboard, you feel you must find a way to use it. Use this presentation as a "stop and check for understanding" lesson within the larger discussion of the American Revolution. On an interactive whiteboard or projector, the whole class can participate. Additionally, the site might be available on a classroom computer for those who need some further reinforcement or for students who are ready to challenge themselves to move to the next lesson. Have cooperative learning groups investigate a specific portion of this site and create an interactive online poster ("glog") using Glogster EDU, reviewed here.
 This resource requires Adobe Flash.

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Oyez: Supreme Court Tour - The Oyez Project

Grades
5 to 12
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This site provides a complete virtual tour of the US Supreme Court. 360-degree panoramic views of the US Supreme Court make you feel like you are right there. Navigation controls ...more
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This site provides a complete virtual tour of the US Supreme Court. 360-degree panoramic views of the US Supreme Court make you feel like you are right there. Navigation controls are available so you can zoom in and out and move around each room. View the exterior and interior areas of the courts. Each view has a written description of what you are viewing. Interior views include a peek into four Supreme Court Justice's chambers. There is also a visual history of the Supreme Court available for viewing. Many of the areas also include video clips with additional information.

tag(s): architecture (83), supreme court (22), washington (36)

In the Classroom

This site is ideal for an interactive whiteboard or projector. Have the students open the site and use the whiteboard tools to visit each area of the supreme court. Share the video clips. This site is also a good tool to use to prepare for a field trip to the Supreme Court. In addition it can be used as a review tool after a field trip. Students can work cooperatively and research one of the areas on the site. They can then use the interactive whiteboard and site as a visual aid for their presentation. Art teachers can use the pictures on the site to teach about historical architectural features. Have art students narrate a picture using ThingLink, reviewed here.
 This resource requires Adobe Flash.

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Chogger - Chogger, LLC

Grades
2 to 12
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Create comics easily and simply by drawing, uploading pictures or graphics, and choosing as many frames as possible to complete your project. Registration is not required to use Chogger....more
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Create comics easily and simply by drawing, uploading pictures or graphics, and choosing as many frames as possible to complete your project. Registration is not required to use Chogger. Click "Create A Comic" to get started. The creator will launch in a new window. Note: to FINISH and share a comic by URL, you must establish a free account.

tag(s): comics and cartoons (74), images (266)

In the Classroom

Use a whole-class account created using a teacher (memberships) email for students to create comics that can be easily monitored/managed by the teacher. Click on buttons to learn the basics that can be used to create the comic. To use, click "Create" and then on "New drawing." Use the tools to create shapes, draw lines, change points, and drag segments easily. Click on the camera icon to take or upload a picture. Click Text tab to add caption bubbles and text. When finished, easily save your comic by adding a title and description. Comics can also be marked private, if you wish. Share completed online comics by copy/pasting the URL of the "finished" comic. Be sure to KEEP a record of these URLs or manage them using "My Comics."

Provide only the link to the "Create" portion of the site to remove possible viewing of public comics. If desired, require students to take a screenshot of their comic instead of saving to the site. Take a snapshot using the print screen (PrtScrn) button on a PC or using the screenshot shortcut in a Mac (apple/shift/4.) Images can then be uploaded to a blog, wiki, or other site for display.

Use Chogger to explain vocabulary words or other concepts from any class or subject area. Use comics to write summaries of current events, responses to reading assignments, expressions of teen problems, and creative works of humor. With younger students, use an interactive whiteboard or projector to share or create a class comic on a current topic of study, such as the life cycle of the frog or ways to conserve energy. Use this site to integrate an art and writing lesson. Why not have students create comics to demonstrate a concept in science or social studies, rather than a traditional paper/pencil quiz? World language teachers and ESL/ELL teachers will love the chance for students to demonstrate written language skills in the "context" of their comic situations. Emotional support /autistic support teachers and students can create comics to help explain social interactions.

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Interactive Map Showing Immigration Data since 1880 - New York Times

Grades
6 to 12
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This interactive map looks at immigration from 1880 through 2000 and draws attention to what census data can tell us for years to come. A slider bar allows you to ...more
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This interactive map looks at immigration from 1880 through 2000 and draws attention to what census data can tell us for years to come. A slider bar allows you to fast-forward (or rewind) history on the US map, and mousing over each county in the country gives you the population of the county in the given year and the number of immigrants. (Be patient. Sometimes the site is slow to open.)

tag(s): census (19), immigration (58), migration (59)

In the Classroom

The map is a good visual for any discussion of the US as a nation of immigrants. The map is ideal for a projector or interactive whiteboard. Additionally, it would provide a large data set for "real life" statistics in a math class. Asking students to predict the ebb and flow of immigrants from various parts of the world as you slide through the years should spark some good class conversation. Have cooperative learning groups investigate specific time periods and create multimedia presentations sharing their findings. Have students create an online poster using Glogster EDU, reviewed here. Another option, have students create videos and share them using a tool such as SchoolTube reviewed here. What will the map show after the next US Census?
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Pick 12 - iCivics, Inc.

Grades
5 to 12
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Teach students about jury selection with this interesting site. First students are given a brief description of the importance of a jury and jury selection. They are then given directions...more
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Teach students about jury selection with this interesting site. First students are given a brief description of the importance of a jury and jury selection. They are then given directions about selecting an impartial jury. Students choose a civil case or a criminal case. Each juror presented has a bit of a background, and students receive points based on not selecting jurors who would be partial to the opposite side. Once all twelve jurors have been chosen, students receive a score and an explanation about why some jurors would be better candidates than others.

tag(s): courts (15)

In the Classroom

In the classroom: Start out using this site with your projector or interactive whiteboard. Divide the class into two teams and assign the teams to be either the prosecutor or the defense attorney. Have students draw straws or pick a number to decide which side will be represented on the whiteboard. On your interactive whiteboard, as each jury candidate appears, list out or underline the reasons why each jury member would be good for either the prosecutor's case or the defendant's case. Teams vote on whether or not they want that juror. The good news: Neither team will lose if the choices are made correctly. Next, have the students play this on their own or as partners, possibly taking the opposite side they were on when this was presented on the whiteboard.
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Cuban Missile Crisis - Avalon project

Grades
8 to 12
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Lists of primary sources, spanning the Cuban Missile Crisis. ...more
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Lists of primary sources, spanning the Cuban Missile Crisis.

tag(s): cold war (29)

In the Classroom

Primary sources could be used to teach both the content and historical thinking skills in your classroom. Divide students into 5-6 groups, with each group assigned a different primary source to read and evaluate. (Sources should come from various perspectives to make the game more interesting, but should have the same general topic) Have the groups present quick summaries of their source to the class, making sure to mention who the author is and whether or not there could be bias. After all have presented, have each team pick a representative to argue in front of the class as to why their source is the most reliable and valid. After all have made their argument, have the class vote off the least reliable "survivor style" until you are left with just one!

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Law Focused Education - Law Focused Education Inc.

Grades
2 to 12
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This comprehensive website, created in Texas, offers resources, lesson plans, and interactives on the latest civic and law-related educational material. The website offers an assortment...more
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This comprehensive website, created in Texas, offers resources, lesson plans, and interactives on the latest civic and law-related educational material. The website offers an assortment of topics from "Bill of Rights Match Game" to "Salute to our Flag Booklets". Many of the topics are presented in English and Spanish. There is even an interactive safety game perfect for traffic/bus safety week. Although some topics refer to the state of Texas, they still can be used for other states. In some cases the links appear to be "dead" but if you click elsewhere there always seems to be alternate link leading to the same place! Don't be afraid to click!

tag(s): american flag (11), bill of rights (28), constitution (79)

In the Classroom

This is a great site for differentiated instruction. The interactive games, for example, the Bill of Rights Match game - can be played as individuals, and then they can print their certificate out (could be used as a "ticket to leave" for understanding). The "Preamble Scrabble Game" could be a timed exercise for groups or teams of students. The teacher could have the game on the projector or interactive whiteboard or again on individual workstations. Allow students to learn about the documents on their own, and then share their understanding by writing a blog post from the point of view of a person whose rights have been violated or a writer of the Constitution. Younger students will benefit from accessing the safety activity both at school and at home, Be sure to share this link with parents on your class web page.
  This resource requires Adobe Flash and PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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Constitutionfacts.com - Oak Hill Publishing

Grades
K to 12
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In spite of the endless verbiage on the home page, this site has many options for topics ranging from the United States Constitution and Amendments to the Supreme Court. ...more
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In spite of the endless verbiage on the home page, this site has many options for topics ranging from the United States Constitution and Amendments to the Supreme Court. Each topic has an overview, sub-topics, and then quizzes to test your knowledge. Dive further in and there is a Fun Zone for treasure hunts, crossword puzzles, and even which founding father are you! On some of the surveys and quizzes it may prompt you for an age and state but it's optional. You can just click the link to see the results and bypass the personal information. Most of this site is designed for older elementary students (and above). However, some of the Constitution Day activities may be useful in the K-2 classrooms.

tag(s): bill of rights (28)

In the Classroom

This is a great site for both introducing and reinforcing topics about the Constitution. Teachers can print out crosswords puzzles for a "What Do I Know" activity. Students could find out which founding father they are in the interactive portion and create a multimedia project on the result. Challenge students to use ThingLink, reviewed here. This site allows users to narrate a picture. Challenge students to find a photo (legally permitted to be reproduced), and then narrate the photo. What a new twist to an oral report! Students could create a Photostory on their own version of the Story of Fourth of July. The possibilities are endless. For fun, teachers can present the Real or Fake Quiz on the projector or interactive whiteboard as whole class instruction or have discussions after each answer.
  This resource requires Adobe Flash and PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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Zfacts - Steve Stoft

Grades
7 to 12
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Looking for zee facts and nothing but zee facts? Check this site for constant updates on national debt, energy issues, and even health care issues. Created by a PhD economist, ...more
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Looking for zee facts and nothing but zee facts? Check this site for constant updates on national debt, energy issues, and even health care issues. Created by a PhD economist, this site boasts balanced and "unbiased" figures and explanations about many social and environmental matters. Read descriptions of the science, history, and reasons for much of the reporting going on today. View video clips of recent news. Find information about Green Energy, Hurricanes, Global Warming, Gas prices, National Debt, and more. What do you think? Does this site have bias?

tag(s): energy (198), hurricanes (35), population (60)

In the Classroom

This site is a must for critically evaluating much of reporting that students may hear in the world today. Use this site along with others to compare information, seek reasons for bias, and spark true discussion about the complexity of world issues. Use the information as tickers or clocks that can be placed on your website, wiki, or blog for students to use to draw conclusions or offer explanations. For example, discussion of gas prices, supply and demand, and issues in global oil trade can grow out of looking at average gas price tickers. If embedding information from this site into your own site, be advised that the author requests attribution by a link back to this site. Have cooperative learning groups investigate one of the topics further and create a multimedia presentation. Have students create news broadcasts and record them on video. Share the video clips using a site such as SchoolTube reviewed here.
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Comments

Be careful of this site....it is politically biased toward democrat ideologies. The author says he's not biased...perhaps he really believes he's being objective. But no way....just good a cocercing graphs to fit the ideology. If you want to slant your students minds to the left...this site is for you. John, , Grades: 9 - 12

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TeachersFirst's US Census Resources - TeachersFirst

Grades
2 to 12
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This collection of reviewed resources from TeachersFirst is selected to help teachers and students learn about the United States census and to plan related projects and classroom activities...more
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This collection of reviewed resources from TeachersFirst is selected to help teachers and students learn about the United States census and to plan related projects and classroom activities for both math and social studies classes at all levels. The census gives us a new lens to view geography, economics, history, current events, pop culture, and-- of course-- math!

tag(s): census (19)

In the Classroom

Whether you spend one class or an entire unit on the census, the ideas included within the "In the Classroom" portion of reviews will launch discussions and meaningful projects for student-centered learning. Consider other census connections, such as using a data or graphing resource to collect and manipulate data from a school mini-census, learning math skills at the same time.

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2010 Census: It's About Us 2010 Census in Schools - Scholastic

Grades
K to 12
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Help your students learn what the census is and why it's important. This site includes lessons and maps for students in all grades. Thematic units focus on history of the ...more
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Help your students learn what the census is and why it's important. This site includes lessons and maps for students in all grades. Thematic units focus on history of the census for using and collecting data. There is information on all territories of the United States (Puerto Rico, U.S. Virgin Islands, Guam, etc..). There are links for teachers, parents, and administrators. And the Family Take Home Pages are available in 27 languages!

tag(s): census (19), population (60), states (162)

In the Classroom

Take advantage of the numerous lesson plans, maps, and other ideas this site offers. Don't forget to check out the diversity lessons and ideas. Have students individually check out the two interactives focusing on geography and history. Encourage parents to check out the section entitled Families. You may consider providing this link on your class website.
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Census in Schools - US Census Bureau

Grades
K to 12
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The US Census Bureau site provides a collection of materials, lessons, and information designed to teach the nation's students about the importance of the census and focusing on encouraging...more
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The US Census Bureau site provides a collection of materials, lessons, and information designed to teach the nation's students about the importance of the census and focusing on encouraging students to help ensure every child and every household member is counted in 2010. The site includes a copy of the census form, dozens of lesson plans/ideas for various grade levels and subjects, and a few simple interactive activities for both kids and teens.

tag(s): census (19), data (148), population (60), states (162)

In the Classroom

Because of the volume of materials and activities, introduce this site on your interactive whiteboard or projector. Then have students explore this site independently or in small groups to put together a Public Service Announcement on participating in the Census 2010. Have students create video advertisements or infomercials. Share the videos using a tool such as Teachers.TV reviewed here. Try using the historical census data or the predicted population data for math projects related to statistics.
 This resource requires PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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Prezi - Prezi

Grades
3 to 12
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Prezi is a visual, "zoomable" presentation tool. It is similar to PowerPoint and Keynote, but there is so much more to Prezi! You can graphically arrange a large amount of ...more
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Prezi is a visual, "zoomable" presentation tool. It is similar to PowerPoint and Keynote, but there is so much more to Prezi! You can graphically arrange a large amount of content, such as a big idea with its supporting information. It creates very dynamic presentations. See samples by clicking "log in" then "Explore" (instead of logging in). Choose a background, follow the instructions and prompts of the program, and before you know it, you will have your very own Prezi to share. If you like to see directions, watch the quick intro video. You can also view Prezis created by others and use them as templates for your own work. Check out the sample created by the TF Edge team here. This tool works in ANY device's web browser, from iPod to Android to laptop. Collaborate on a Prezi with other Prezi members in real time using the Share function. Have a "meeting" to work on the same Prezi in real time. There is a free "edu enjoy" level of membership (requires a school issued email and verification) that allows you to keep your Prezis private, out of public sharing. The regular "enjoy" membership is free for only one month, and its Prezis are public. File storage limits apply to free accounts. It is worth noting that some people find Prezi causes motion-sickness if it zooms too much!

tag(s): graphic organizers (43), visualizations (14)

In the Classroom

You could map your entire lesson, chapter or unit in one Prezi. Once you introduce the concept with this tool, you can go back to it often with your students as you move to different parts of the unit. It would provide a great way to connect prior knowledge with the next step if you share this on your interactive whiteboard or projector throughout the unit. Or you could post it to your web page or give kids the URL so they can review as often as they need it. Try having the students map a concept or chapter with this tool. In history class, create timelines of relevant events, or in science or math class have them map steps in a process. Have students create Prezis for different events, and then have them post the link to their product on a class blog or wiki. Add a peer review component and require students to comment on at least two other Prezis. The possibilities are endless!

If you have gifted students n your class, offer Prezi as one alternative for sharing extensions to the regular curriculum. If they already know the material, have them investigate a related process or example and share it in the form of a Prezi.

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Abraham Lincoln's Crossroads - National Constitution Center

Grades
6 to 12
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Advise Abraham Lincoln as he makes important decisions that affect the future of the nation. History comes alive through this free interactive and animated educational activity. It's...more
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Advise Abraham Lincoln as he makes important decisions that affect the future of the nation. History comes alive through this free interactive and animated educational activity. It's a cinch that your students will better understand what our nation experienced during Lincoln's presidency. Each of thirteen "chapters" of history comes with rich resources and hyperlinks.

tag(s): civil war (145), constitution (79), lincoln (86)

In the Classroom

This activity could be used by individual students or in small groups. An interactive whiteboard or projector would also work fine. Since there is no right or wrong advice, students could tap in on the resources as they research to support their decisions and to speculate on how history might have turned out differently had Lincoln made other decisions. Perhaps have them write a blog post as Lincoln trying to make a decision. Have groups create multimedia presentations to share their decisions and possible outcomes. How about a podcast using a site such as PodOmatic (reviewed here). Or have students create news reports and video to share with the class. Share the videos using a site such as Teachers.TV reviewed here.
 This resource requires Adobe Flash.

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The Story of Stuff - The Story of Stuff Project

Grades
6 to 12
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The Story of Stuff is a 20-minute web cartoon that illustrates how all the "stuff" we use affects our lives and our planet. While the cartoon clearly has a liberal-leaning ...more
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The Story of Stuff is a 20-minute web cartoon that illustrates how all the "stuff" we use affects our lives and our planet. While the cartoon clearly has a liberal-leaning political agenda, that should not deter you from using it. In fact, asking students to point out its biases would be an important lesson in sorting out perspective in a persuasive argument. The site adds cartoons dealing with other "wasteful" topics fairly often, such as the "cap and trade" energy issue, bottled water, and electronics. The "downloads" tab offers PDF versions of the script, posters and other promotional material, and short teaser video clips of the film.

tag(s): environment (317), sociology (22)

In the Classroom

Useful in classes on economics, ecology, consumer living, sociology or current events, the film would provide a wonderful discuss lead-in on topics ranging from consumer decision making to the environment. Because the site operates under the "Creative Commons" copyright agreement, you can download your own copy of the film for educational use or order a DVD copy.
  This resource requires Adobe Flash and PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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Centuries of Citizenship: A Constitutional Timeline - National Constitution Center

Grades
5 to 12
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This interactive timeline is an historical experience that explains the key events of the U.S. Constitution. The events begin with the Magna Carta in 1215 and continue to 2009. Use...more
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This interactive timeline is an historical experience that explains the key events of the U.S. Constitution. The events begin with the Magna Carta in 1215 and continue to 2009. Use the broadband interactive timeline to give your students the ultimate experience. Students can explore primary documents, view maps and graphs, hear audio clips, listen to debates, read pertinent stories in the New York Times, and learn who had the right to vote during specific time periods. Be sure to also visit the Interactive Constitution. Search the Constitution by keywords, topics, or court cases. This website is definitely worth the visit!

tag(s): bill of rights (28), constitution (79)

In the Classroom

Use this website to engage your students to learn more about different eras of U.S. History. Challenge students to debate the issues found in "Point Counterpoint." Use the primary sources to discuss relevant historical issues or how the problems presented might be found in current events. Use the interactive U.S. Constitution to help with your Constitution Day activities. A link to a pdf file of the entire U.S. Constitution is available. Have students create a multimedia presentation using Thinglink, reviewed here. This site allows users to narrate a picture. Challenge students to find a photo (legally permitted to be reproduced), and then narrate the photo as if it is a news report about the U.S. Constitution.
  This resource requires Adobe Flash and PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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iCivics - iCivics Inc.

Grades
5 to 10
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iCivics is a web-based education project designed to teach students civics and encourage them to participate in the democratic process. The project is spearheaded by Justice Sandra...more
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iCivics is a web-based education project designed to teach students civics and encourage them to participate in the democratic process. The project is spearheaded by Justice Sandra Day O'Connor and includes law professors and educators from around the country. iCivics.org provides detailed lessons designed for very specific judicial and constitutional concepts as well as for the executive and legislative branches. Some of the lessons have videos and links to other relevant websites. In addition to the lessons, iCivics features several engaging interactives on civics topics, democracy, branches of government, citizenship, elections and campaigns, and the constitution. Several include full teacher manuals (PDF) and a detailed report of student game performance -- very useful for assessment. There are webquests on civics topics, as well. In addition, iCivics.org has a useful feature that helps locate other websites with resources specifically correlated to your state standards. You can also search using grade level. The site continues to grow and add new materials and activities on an ongoing basis. Don't miss the interactive called "Cast Your Vote" to prioritize issues and evaluate candidates! Videos from iCivics reside on YouTube. If your district blocks YouTube, the videos may not be viewable. You could always view them at home and bring them to class "on a stick" to share. Use a tool such as Freemake Video Converter, reviewed here, to download the videos from YouTube.

tag(s): bill of rights (28), branches of government (48), congress (33), constitution (79), courts (15), democracy (12), elections (75), game based learning (103), presidents (131), supreme court (22)

In the Classroom

As you study the Constitution or U.S. government, have students participate in the activities, stopping to write blog entries as their legal character discussing the results they have achieved in court or in their role within other interactive simulations. Students can work individually or with a partner. Be sure to demonstrate the activities on an interactive whiteboard or projector so students understand how they work. Another option: Have students create a multimedia guide to one of the constitutional rights learned in the games. Use a tool such as Piktochart, reviewed here, to make an interactive poster or infographic on each right.

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Buzzle Web Portal - Buzzle.Com

Grades
8 to 12
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This web portal offers news articles on a vast variety of topics. The articles are searchable with a Google based tool bar, and they are also indexed by topic. Category ...more
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This web portal offers news articles on a vast variety of topics. The articles are searchable with a Google based tool bar, and they are also indexed by topic. Category topics range from Arts & Literature to Health & Fitness to Science and Technology. Articles are written by a base of experts who sign up to write for Buzzle.

tag(s): critical thinking (108), news (261)

In the Classroom

Use this in addition to other research resources in projects. Be sure to discuss the fact that authors are not always identified and have a class pro/con discussion about the reliability of web pages where many people contribute. How would YOU select writers for such a site? Or assign students to read specific articles and discuss them via the class wiki space. Not comfortable with wikis? Have no wiki worries - check out the TeachersFirst's Wiki Walk-Through.

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