TeachersFirst - Featured Sites: Week of Dec 12, 2021

Here are this week's features. Clicking the tags in the description area of each listing will present a list of other resources with this topic. | Click here to return to the Featured Sites Archive

 

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How Do Human Rights Work? - Equality and Human Rights Commission

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8 to 12
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How Do Human Rights Work? is one of twelve lessons offered by the Equality and Human Rights Commission that teaches students about different components of human rights. This lesson...more
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How Do Human Rights Work? is one of twelve lessons offered by the Equality and Human Rights Commission that teaches students about different components of human rights. This lesson begins with a quiz that asks students to consider additional questions about their understanding and views on human rights. The main lessons take a look at human rights throughout history, focusing on modern ideas of human rights that developed after the Holocaust. This lesson includes a complete Teacher's Guide and support materials, with student worksheets and lesson slides.

tag(s): civil rights (155), holocaust (39), identity (25), religions (64), social and emotional learning (60), world war 2 (135)

In the Classroom

Include this lesson as part of lessons teaching about the Holocaust and human rights. Engage students by replacing the quiz on the included slide with an interactive quiz response tool such as Quizizz, reviewed here. Use the PowerPoint slide presentation as a starting point to make an interactive learning experience using Google Slides, reviewed here, or Microsoft PowerPoint, reviewed here. Add links to additional resources, videos, and images to enhance student learning. Extend learning by asking students to create a human rights campaign using Canva for Education, reviewed here. Canva for Education provides options for creating media such as infographics, presentations, and videos.
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Equality and Human Rights Lesson Plan Ideas - Equality and Human Rights Commission

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8 to 12
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This series of twelve lessons provides resources for teaching an understanding of human rights issues and discovering how to take action toward human rights issues in students' communities....more
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This series of twelve lessons provides resources for teaching an understanding of human rights issues and discovering how to take action toward human rights issues in students' communities. It isn't necessary to teach all lessons in the order given; however, it provides a framework for instruction that begins with learning about empathy, discrimination, and prejudice and guides students toward self-reflection. Each lesson includes teacher notes, supplementary materials such as videos, student worksheets, and PowerPoint slides. The videos reside on YouTube. If your district blocks YouTube, then they may not be viewable.

tag(s): civil rights (155), empathy (28), identity (25), social and emotional learning (60)

In the Classroom

Include these lessons among your resources when teaching Citizenship, as part of English lessons, or within your Personal Social Health and Economic Education (PHSEE) Standards. Many lessons provide excellent resources for use by school counselors to provide support in social and emotional learning. If time is limited, divide students into groups that participate in different lessons then share their learning with peers. If dividing up lessons, consider having all students complete the final two lessons that focus on personal attitudes and discussions of equality within local communities. Engage students by beginning lessons with a simple group response tool such as Answer Garden, reviewed here. Provide a prompt in Answer Garden and ask students to respond; Answer Garden creates a word cloud based on the answers. Enhance student learning using edpuzzle, reviewed here, when watching videos. Add comments, questions, and additional information within the videos to guide students toward a deeper understanding of the content. As a final extension activity, ask students to prepare a plan for their community that focuses on improving human rights locally. Use Adobe Creative Cloud Express for Education, reviewed here, to prepare a video or website to share with local officials.
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Project Ready - UNC-Chapel Hill's School of Information and Library Science

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K to 12
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Project Ready provides twenty-seven teaching modules focused on improving relationships and instruction to multicultural youth. The curriculum focuses on educating youth services library...more
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Project Ready provides twenty-seven teaching modules focused on improving relationships and instruction to multicultural youth. The curriculum focuses on educating youth services library staff on how to amplify multicultural works. It provides strategies for improving library programs and services for urban youth, Indigenous youth, and children and teens of any color. Included in each module are videos and audio examples focused on the topic. Begin with the Curriculum Guide to understand the organization of the modules and the thought process toward creating the cycle of instruction.

tag(s): cross cultural understanding (145), difficult conversations (43), diversity (31), native americans (79), racism (68)

In the Classroom

Project Ready's modules are designed for use by individuals or small groups. Although this content is directed at library services, the information is invaluable for anyone who works with youth. Follow the curriculum for your personal growth or as a grade or content-level peer group. Completing all of the modules requires an extended time period; in fact, it might be helpful to use for professional development over two years instead of one school year. If you and your peers don't have time to complete all of the curricula, consider choosing individual modules based on your desired professional development goals and school needs to study as a group or for your own personal development.
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Promoting A Sense Of Self: Experiences And Activities - Virtual Lab School

Grades
K to 1
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Learn how to support and encourage children by understanding anti-bias teaching methods that recognize and support individual student needs with this self-paced professional development...more
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Learn how to support and encourage children by understanding anti-bias teaching methods that recognize and support individual student needs with this self-paced professional development lesson. Learning activities include embracing diversity, multiple social identities, and embracing character through understanding the six pillars of character education. This lesson also includes strategies for strengthening family relationships and ideas for developing student interests through short and long-term projects.

tag(s): bias (17), bullying (52), character education (67), difficult conversations (43), diversity (31), identity (25), professional development (264)

In the Classroom

Share this lesson with your peers to use as a learning opportunity or review the included ideas to support students' identity and awareness of others' diversity. Consider sharing a link to this article with parents to help them develop skills for discussing character issues and diversity at home. Use Padlet, reviewed here, to share this article with parents and curate other information from a variety of resources to support and provide education with dealing with character education issues at home.

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Identity and Characteristics Lesson - Equality and Human Rights Commission

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8 to 12
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Explore the different sides of identity to understand the complexities and ever-changing facets of identity through this lesson's secondary students' activities. Follow the teacher...more
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Explore the different sides of identity to understand the complexities and ever-changing facets of identity through this lesson's secondary students' activities. Follow the teacher notes to determine the concept of identity, reflect upon students' characteristics, and then take a broader look at the class's shared attributes. This lesson includes links to download the teacher notes, slides, and student worksheets.

tag(s): bias (17), character education (67), identity (25)

In the Classroom

Use this lesson, and others found on this site to teach students about identity characteristics and assist in understanding bias. Incorporate the use of Google Slides, reviewed here, to enhance instruction by creating cohesive activities within the slides. Within your slide presentation, create slides for each group to use for the different activities. For example, the starter activity asks students to compare images of babies and adults. Use a table for students to add their thoughts under each of the categories. Add links within your slide presentation to the worksheets shared on the site and to WordItOut, reviewed here, to create a class word cloud.
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Social Justice Standards: Unpacking Identity - Learning for Justice

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8 to 12
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Delve into the essential questions of how identity develops and how it affects our relationships with this professional development topic from Learning for Justice. This lesson teaches...more
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Delve into the essential questions of how identity develops and how it affects our relationships with this professional development topic from Learning for Justice. This lesson teaches the five identity anchor standards and how identity affects relationships in a school and classrooms. Use the charts as a reflection piece to focus on your identity and learn through school-related scenarios on how to apply and teach anti-bias standards to students.

tag(s): character education (67), cross cultural understanding (145), difficult conversations (43), empathy (28), identity (25), professional development (264), racism (68)

In the Classroom

Use this course as an introduction to understanding bias and identity from both a personal and professional level. Adapt information from this course to include in your lessons on racism, empathy, and difficult conversations. For example, use the images and charts in the application section to identify and understand that first impression and physical characteristics don't always provide a complete picture of another person's identity. Include these activities as part of a larger teaching unit using a learning management system such as ClassFlow, reviewed here. ClassFlow includes many options for building interactive lessons that promote critical thinking skills through various response formats, media options, and teacher feedback.

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Sojourner Truth: Abolitionist and Human Rights Activist - PBS Learning Media

Grades
3 to 7
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Learn about Sojourner Truth and her fight against slavery along with her support for women and equal rights using primary sources in this lesson provided by PBS Learning Media. The...more
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Learn about Sojourner Truth and her fight against slavery along with her support for women and equal rights using primary sources in this lesson provided by PBS Learning Media. The lesson includes a video and two primary source documents - a photo of Sojourner Truth and excerpts from her most famous speech. Information is correlated to National Standards for History, Civics and Government, Common Core State Standards, and College and Career Readiness Standards.

tag(s): black history (82), civil rights (155), civil war (128), women (98)

In the Classroom

Take advantage of this free lesson to introduce students to Sojourner Truth, Civil Rights, or Women's Rights. Share the lesson into your Google Classroom account using the provided link. Extend this lesson using technology to motivate and engage students as they learn more about each topic. Create an entire unit that includes this lesson within Actively Learn, reviewed here. Include links to additional online resources, have students take notes, and include assessments all within the Actively Learn framework. Use the many resources found at ReadWriteThink, reviewed here, to help students organize and share information. For example, use the Bio Cube with students to organize biographical information on Sojourner Truth or have students use the Comic Creator to tell the story of Sojourner Truth. For a complete multimedia presentation, ask students to use Book Creator, reviewed here, to share their information about Women's Rights. Book Creator offers a variety of options to include in the digital books such as video, images, audio, and more.
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What has the United Nations ever done for you? - The Guardian

Grades
6 to 12
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This interactive offers the opportunity to view what the United Nations has done to help people of all ages from around the world. Choose a persona by entering gender, age, ...more
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This interactive offers the opportunity to view what the United Nations has done to help people of all ages from around the world. Choose a persona by entering gender, age, and country to view a list of ways the United Nations has had a positive influence on their situation. Categories include items such as Human Rights, Child Mortality, and Cultural Heritage. The site was created in the UK, so some of the pronunciations and spellings may differ from those in American English.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): cross cultural understanding (145), cultures (97), united nations (6)

In the Classroom

Introduce this site on an interactive whiteboard or projector. Allow students to explore on their own. Social studies teachers will want to bookmark this interactive for use throughout the year as students learn about different countries and cultures. Instead of paper notecards enhance student learning by having them use Simplenote, reviewed here, to take digital notes; tell students to be sure to save the URL to share their notes and questions with you and their peers. updates across all devices Then, modify technology use by challenging students create a simple infographic sharing their findings using Easel.ly, reviewed here, to explain what they learned from this site.

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Created Equal - National Endowment for the Humanities

Grades
9 to 12
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Four documentary films related to the Civil Rights Movement, available to stream either in part or in their entirety, form the centerpiece of this effort from the National Endowment...more
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Four documentary films related to the Civil Rights Movement, available to stream either in part or in their entirety, form the centerpiece of this effort from the National Endowment for the Humanities. The films cover time periods beginning with the Abolitionist Movement and continuing through the Freedom Marches and the turbulent 1960s. Explore the meaning of freedom and equality in the United States with relevance still today. There are teacher resources, lesson plans, and suggestions for aligning lessons to the Common Core.

tag(s): bill of rights (24), black history (82), civil rights (155), civil war (128), emancipation proclamation (7), segregation (16)

In the Classroom

The documentaries, or the excerpts presented, are all available to stream from the site. While they may be too lengthy to show in their entirety during one class period, they have also been divided into clips according to themes. For example, Equality is part of the full video about Law and the Strategy of Nonviolence. This makes them more adaptable for classroom use. Share the videos on your interactive whiteboard or projector, or flip your class using EdPuzzle, reviewed here, and have students watch clips at home and come back to class ready to discuss. EdPuzzle is a great way to take sections of videos and add your own voice or add questions within the video. Alternatively, you could use VideoAnt, reviewed here, to enhance student learning with students asking questions about the parts where they need clarification. The issues raised by these Created Equal documentaries may be easily incorporated into lessons related to the Civil Rights Movement, modern U.S. history, Black History Month, or civics and government. Use these videos as conversation starters in the classroom.

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Voices of Youth - UNICEF

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6 to 12
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Voices of Youth is UNICEF's online home for young people to know more, learn more, and do more about our world. Read articles, view videos, and share thoughts and opinions ...more
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Voices of Youth is UNICEF's online home for young people to know more, learn more, and do more about our world. Read articles, view videos, and share thoughts and opinions with others around the world on global topics. Topics include poverty, education, human rights, health issues, and much more. Choose from links on the home page to find information on specific topics. Scroll through the page to read the latest posts. Click on tags at the bottom of each article to find related articles. Easily view the site in French or Spanish using links provided at the top of each page. Create your own posts or add comments after registration on the site; use email or use a Facebook or Twitter account to register. Some of the videos are hosted on YouTube. If your school blocks YouTube, they may not be viewable.

tag(s): disabilities (26), environment (220), hiv/aids (19), inequalities (21), mental health (28), school violence (13)

In the Classroom

This site is an excellent resource to bookmark and use throughout the year when discussing current events, specific countries or geographic areas, or for non-fiction reading. Find informational texts that matter to your students. Spark informational writing, as well. Allow students to browse the site to find interesting articles. Have students enhance their learning by creating magazine covers of information found on this site using Magazine Cover Maker, reviewed here. Elevate learning by challenging students to create a newspaper article using articles found on this site as a model by using the Newspaper Clipping Generator, reviewed here. World language teachers will find this useful when viewing articles in French or Spanish to practice translation skills. If you have a blended learning classroom or are teaching remotely you may want to try adding the reading to Fiskkit, reviewed here, to annotate and analyze text and measure reading activity through sharing and commenting on texts. For the videos you could use VideoAnt, reviewed here, to ask questions and have students respond directly on the video.

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The Anne Frank Trust UK-Her Story, Today's World * - The Anne Frank Trust UK

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8 to 12
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Here you will find information about Anne Frank and her father. The Anne Frank Trust UK is the partner organization of the Anne Frank House in Amsterdam whose mission is ...more
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Here you will find information about Anne Frank and her father. The Anne Frank Trust UK is the partner organization of the Anne Frank House in Amsterdam whose mission is to draw on the power of Anne Frank's life and diary to challenge prejudice and reduce hatred, encouraging people to embrace positive attitudes, responsibility and respect for others. Some of the resources, intended for the UK, cost money. However, the news and other resources links are free to download and have valuable up-to-date information and sources to take advantage of in your classroom.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): anne frank (8), holocaust (39), jews (23), nazis (9), remembrance day (6), women (98), world war 2 (135)

In the Classroom

Use the powerful messages drawn from the story of Anne Frank to help foster an understanding among today's teenagers of positive citizenship, human rights, democracy and respect for the individual. Log on to this site and click on the Education and Home Learning tabs to find resources for your classroom and students. These sections provide critical, relevant information about how to teach Anne Frank's story, the history of the Holocaust, and contemporary issues related to these subjects. Use the About tab and slide down to The Diary of Anne Frank, and project on your whiteboard the features on this page. There is an in-depth look at the difference made by Anne's father, Otto Frank, 50 years after the doors of the Anne Frank House opened to the public. Your class can then create a pledge to stand up against bullying, prejudice, and hatred and defend those who cannot defend themselves. Have students or student groups create an online, interactive poster using ThingLink, reviewed here, of the pledge to sign. Display it on your class wiki or webpage to share with families.

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National Underground Railroad Freedom Center - National Underground Railroad Freedom Center

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6 to 12
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The National Underground Railroad Freedom Center, located in Cincinnati, Ohio, offers this site with resources about slavery, past and present. Although a portion of the site is designed...more
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The National Underground Railroad Freedom Center, located in Cincinnati, Ohio, offers this site with resources about slavery, past and present. Although a portion of the site is designed specifically for visitors to the Center, there are good resources and lesson plans on the Underground Railroad, the problem of modern day slavery, and human rights. The site also has a good section on the special challenges of doing genealogical research on families who have experienced slavery.

tag(s): genealogy (7), slavery (57), underground railroad (9)

In the Classroom

Use the lesson plans (found under Online Resources) in your own preparation, and make this site available to students who are doing research on the Underground Railroad. If your class is doing any family tree research as a part of a discussion on immigration, this site may be useful to students who have ancestors who were enslaved. Have students create a family tree using an online tool such as Family Tree Creator, reviewed here.

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Pennies for Peace - Central Asia Institute

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K to 12
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Inspire students to believe they can make a difference in the world. "Pennies for Peace" is an international service-learning project that does not ask families to contribute large...more
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Inspire students to believe they can make a difference in the world. "Pennies for Peace" is an international service-learning project that does not ask families to contribute large sums of money. Author of the book "Three Cups of Tea," Greg Mortenson, and his young daughter Amira believe that by donating pennies children can help support education in Afghanistan and Pakistan while simultaneously promoting peace.

The project comes with an extensive toolkit that shows how to implement the campaign, provides background resources and curriculum materials. The toolkit is grouped by the grade levels, K-4, 4-8, and 9-12. The Pennies for Peace Curriculum directly links to grade level standards in social studies, math, and literacy. In order to participate schools need to register on-line. There is a page for "kids" that provides facts about a typical village and school and background information about Pakistan and Afghanistan. The tool kit contains videos and photographs as well as maps from National Geographic that are free for download. The videos will take participants through the steps of implementing the project to interviewing Greg Mortenson, possible classroom applications, and short clips to support sections of their curriculum. Address core subjects such as social studies, math, history, geography, science and language arts while enhancing cultural awareness in your students.

tag(s): critical thinking (101), cross cultural understanding (145), service projects (17)

In the Classroom

Launch this campaign together as a school-wide effort or keep it to your classroom. Introduce this site on your interactive whiteboard or projector. Then have students explore this site independently or in small groups. The toolkit gives very concrete lesson plans to follow fully or just in parts. One example is for younger students to examine a map of the area in which they live and then compare that to where children in Pakistan live. Essential questions such as "How does where we live effect how we live?" and "What are the similarities and differences between these places?" Ask students to visit the site and enhance their learning by creating an interactive book using a tool like Ourboox, reviewed here, or Book Creator, reviewed here, about both geographic locations. Older students can extend their learning by creating an interactive map with a tool like MapHub, reviewed here. Use the printable images from this site for your bulletin boards. Older students can participate in book clubs that read either Greg Mortenson's original book "Three Cups of Tea" or his new book "Stones to Schools". There is a version of his book for Younger Readers, "Three Cups of Tea: One Man's Journey to Change the World...One Child at a Time" which includes photos and illustrations and a children's picture book "Listen to the Wind" that may be useful for introducing the project.
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The First Amendment: What's Fair in a Free Country? - National Endowment for the Humanities

Grades
3 to 6
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The cherished right of Freedom of Speech is carefully analyzed in this thoughtful unit plan that illustrates the delicate balance between rights and responsibilities in a free society....more
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The cherished right of Freedom of Speech is carefully analyzed in this thoughtful unit plan that illustrates the delicate balance between rights and responsibilities in a free society. A series of six lessons guides upper elementary students through an authentic scenario in which the expressive rights of individuals are in question, provides connections to constitutional interpretations, and analyzes related Supreme Court cases. Aligned to Standards.

tag(s): bill of rights (24), freedom of speech (12), speech (68)

In the Classroom

Take advantage of this free lesson plan about the First Amendment and the Bill of Rights! To help ELL students, consider using a guided reading activity and vocabulary tools found at Read Ahead, reviewed here, share the vocabulary with them beforehand, OR make and print out easy to understand definitions of words that these students may have trouble with. Be sure to save this site as a favorite to allow for easy retrieval later on.

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