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Venn Diagram - 3 Circles - ReadWriteThink

Grades
4 to 12
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Create a 3 Circle Venn Diagram with ease! Print out this graphic organizer and provide a title and label the three circles. Decide whether to make a list for each ...more
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Create a 3 Circle Venn Diagram with ease! Print out this graphic organizer and provide a title and label the three circles. Decide whether to make a list for each circle first, or start writing directly on the circles. The Venn Diagram allows for generating concepts (ideas, words) and placing them in any of the three circles, or the overlapping area. There is no registration required.

tag(s): graphic organizers (45), venn diagrams (14)

In the Classroom

Demonstrate the use of this with a student filling in the three circle Venn Diagram on a projector or interactive whiteboard. Have students compare and contrast three well-known topics such as three television shows or sports. Ask students to suggest the items for the list for each circle. Have your demonstrator show how to drag and drop the items into the circle or overlap area. Then have small groups or individual students create their own Venn Diagrams. Venn Diagrams may be used in any grade level or content area. Use the 3 Circle Venn Diagrams as an icebreaker or beginning of the year activity. Randomly place three students together and have them use the Venn Diagram to show their similarities and differences. Use when forming new small groups during the year for students to get to know each other better. Use the three circle Venn Diagram as a study aid when reviewing a unit in science or history before a test. Compare and contrast three characters, three different versions of the same story, or a literary work and a painting and song, or a painting and film. Another suggestion is to have students compare books in a series and the shared elements in the books.

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