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The Flat Earth Theory Explained - BuzzFeed

Grades
6 to 12
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Do you believe that the earth is flat? This six and a half minute YouTube video discusses the different theories proposed by different groups that the earth is flat, not ...more
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Do you believe that the earth is flat? This six and a half minute YouTube video discusses the different theories proposed by different groups that the earth is flat, not round. The announcer begins with an explanation of the Bedford Level Experiment based upon viewing a boat from the shore to explain that the earth is flat, and then moves through other examples that "flat earthers" espouse. As a final comment, the announcer challenges viewers to research the different ideas and decide for themselves if the earth is flat or round.
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tag(s): earth (227), gravity (52), tides (9)

In the Classroom

This video provides the perfect opportunity to engage students in research to prove something they have always believed - that the earth is round. Challenge students to prove that it is true through their own research (instead of just accepting what they have always been told). Begin eliciting prior knowledge from students by asking them to share their own observations of the earth. Use FlipGrid, reviewed here to post a question for students to share a video discussion of their observations of the earth and their proof that it is round or flat. Enhance learning through differentiation of activities for student research. Offer students different options for recording their findings. Options include creating infographics using Canva Infographic Maker, reviewed here, sharing annotated images made with ThingLink, reviewed here, or with a concept map created with MindMup, reviewed here. Extend student learning even further by connecting your students with experts in your community or through online options like Skype in the Classroom, reviewed here to discuss their findings and pose any remaining questions.

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