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Oral History Activity: Uprooted! Japanese Americans During WWII - California Museum

Grades
4 to 10
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This distance learning lesson uses four oral history videos of persons that lived through incarceration camps to teach the story of discrimination toward Japanese Americans during WWII....more
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This distance learning lesson uses four oral history videos of persons that lived through incarceration camps to teach the story of discrimination toward Japanese Americans during WWII. The content is correlated to Common Core Standards and California Content Area Connections. A set of discussion questions accompanies each of the videos in the first portion of the lesson. During the second activity, students dig deeper into the symbolism and feelings evoked from watching the videos. The California Museum also provides a playlist of videos to accompany these activities, learn more about them here. The videos are hosted on YouTube. If your district blocks YouTube, then they may not be viewable.

tag(s): cross cultural understanding (143), difficult conversations (41), japanese (43), oral history (13), world war 2 (133)

In the Classroom

Use the videos and lesson activities included on this site as part of any unit on discrimination, WWII, and American History. Engage students in learning as you start your unit using Google Jamboard, reviewed here. Ask students to add sticky notes or text to a prompt that asks them what they understand about discrimination or events during WWII. Instead of providing a worksheet for students to respond to the questions included in this activity, use edpuzzle, reviewed here, to add questions and discussion activities within each video. Extend learning further by asking students to create blog posts using Edublogs, reviewed here, to discuss discrimination against the Japanese during WWII and reflect upon how that impacts Japanese Americans in current times.
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