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iThrive Sim: Follow the Facts - ithrive games

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9 to 12
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iThrive Sim: Follow the Facts is a digital role-playing simulation game with situations that help students in high school social studies, history, and humanities classes to strengthen...more
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iThrive Sim: Follow the Facts is a digital role-playing simulation game with situations that help students in high school social studies, history, and humanities classes to strengthen civic and social-emotional learning (SEL). The digital simulations are designed to support student-driven learning, and the student's actions determine the storyline. Students will play as journalists reporting on a breaking story. To get the truth, they need to find credible sources, collaborate with peers, and report the story with accuracy and without bias. Registration with a school email address is required to play. This game was designed to function within school firewalls. If you have trouble accessing it, please contact your school's IT department. iThrive Sim: Leading Through Crisis scenario is centered around topics that may be sensitive for some students. Consider offering alternatives or providing extra support if needed.

tag(s): bias (18), game based learning (167), journalism (69), media literacy (90), simulations (6), social and emotional learning (70)

In the Classroom

Engage your high school students with iThrive Sim: Follow the Facts. The game-based simulation includes teacher preparation, pre-simulation, and optional post-simulation activities. The entire simulation takes about two thirty-minute sessions total to play. Teachers should plan for the full simulation and activities to take at least five 45-minute class periods. A complete implementation guide is included. Civics topics include effective sourcing of information, SEL skills include understanding bias and collaboration.

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iThrive Sim: Leading Though Crisis - ithrive games

Grades
9 to 12
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iThrive Sim: Leading Through Crisis is a digital role-playing simulation game. The situation helps students in high school social studies, history, and humanities classes to strengthen...more
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iThrive Sim: Leading Through Crisis is a digital role-playing simulation game. The situation helps students in high school social studies, history, and humanities classes to strengthen civic and social-emotional learning (SEL). The digital simulations are designed to support student-driven learning, and the student's actions determine the storyline. Students will play as government officials who need to work collaboratively to analyze the data they receive to make decisions. Registration with a school email address is required to play. This game was designed to function within school firewalls. If you have trouble accessing it, please contact your school's IT department. iThrive Sim: Leading Through Crisis scenario is centered around topics that may be sensitive for some students. Consider offering alternatives or providing extra support if needed.

tag(s): game based learning (167), simulations (6), social and emotional learning (70)

In the Classroom

Engage your high school students with iThrive Sim: Leading Through Crisis. The game-based simulation includes teacher preparation, pre-simulation, and optional post-simulation activities. The full simulation takes about two thirty-minute sessions total to play. Teachers should plan for the entire simulation and activities to take at least five 45-minute class periods. A complete implementation guide is included. Civics topics include the 25th Amendment and the Presidential Cabinet, SEL skills include decision-making.

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iThrive Sim: Lives in Balance - ithrive games

Grades
9 to 12
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iThrive Sim: Lives in Balance is a digital role-playing simulation game. The situation helps students in high school social studies, history, and humanities classes to strengthen civic...more
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iThrive Sim: Lives in Balance is a digital role-playing simulation game. The situation helps students in high school social studies, history, and humanities classes to strengthen civic and social-emotional learning (SEL). The digital simulations are designed to support student-driven learning, and the student's actions determine the storyline. Students will play as government officials who must work collaboratively to analyze the data they receive to make decisions. Registration with a school email address is required to play. This game was designed to function within school firewalls. Please contact your school's IT department if you have trouble accessing it. iThrive Sim: Lives in Balance event is centered around topics that may be sensitive for some students. Consider offering alternatives or providing extra support if needed.

tag(s): game based learning (167), simulations (6), social and emotional learning (70)

In the Classroom

Engage your high school students with iThrive Sim: Lives in Balance. The game-based simulation includes teacher preparation, pre-simulation, and optional post-simulation activities. The full simulation takes about 35 minutes to play. Therefore, teachers should plan for the entire simulation and activities to take at least three 45-minute class periods. A complete implementation guide is included. Civics topics include the 10th Amendment and Federalism, and SEL skills include decision-making, compromise, and advocacy.

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iThrive Sim- Digital Simulation Games - ithrive games

Grades
9 to 12
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Engage and enhance students' civic and social-emotional (SEL) learning using simulations by iThrive Sim. The simulations are for high school students in social studies, history, and...more
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Engage and enhance students' civic and social-emotional (SEL) learning using simulations by iThrive Sim. The simulations are for high school students in social studies, history, and humanities classes. The digital simulations are designed to support student-driven learning, and the storyline is determined by the actions students take together. The page includes links to three learning scenarios where teachers can preview the game. Registration with a school email address is required to play. The resources on this site are designed for high school students.

tag(s): collaboration (87), flipped learning (8), game based learning (167), Online Learning (35), simulations (6), social and emotional learning (70)

In the Classroom

Teachers can find links to individual games, downloadable curricula for various video games, lesson plans, and teaching resources. These game simulations are designed to build skills in decision-making, understanding bias, compromise, advocacy, and collaboration among students. The games support face-to-face interaction and can also be adapted to the needs of online and hybrid learning environments.

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How to Research: Ultimate Guide [+Online Tools] - IvyPanda

Grades
5 to 12
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This handy guide provides step-by-step information on creating a research paper from start to finish. The manual begins with an overview of the three universal research purposes - exploratory,...more
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This handy guide provides step-by-step information on creating a research paper from start to finish. The manual begins with an overview of the three universal research purposes - exploratory, descriptive, and explanatory. Then, each step provides specific information on the nine essential items to complete the research. In addition, this article includes a handy image that provides a visual representation of the basic steps required for a research paper.

tag(s): presentations (8), process writing (40), Research (65), writing (299)

In the Classroom

This article is quite lengthy, but it provides students with a great deal of information on research and reporting researched information. At a minimum, share the provided link to the step-by-step image with students to use as a reference guide. For more in-depth lessons, break down the information into smaller pieces and include them in your current research project lessons. Consider using a curation tool such as Padlet, reviewed here, to share this resource and others with students to guide research projects. For example, include a column with tools for evaluating sources such as Checkology, reviewed here, and another column with online tools to create citations such as MyBib, reviewed here. Offer students an option of different tools to create and share their presentations, including Ourboox, reviewed here, to create a digital flipbook or Powtoon, reviewed here, as an option for video presentations.

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OK2Ask: Fostering Accountability: Media Literacy in the Classroom - TeachersFirst

Grades
1 to 12
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This recording of an OK2Ask online professional learning session is from July 2022. You can register and immediately view the archive of the session.

As digital media increasingly
...more
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This recording of an OK2Ask online professional learning session is from July 2022. You can register and immediately view the archive of the session.

As digital media increasingly replaces traditional media, students must have the skills to think critically about these new types of texts. Media literacy - the ability to skillfully read and write in a wide range of message forms - allows students to identify themes and issues emerging from popular culture and has related standards that have been incorporated across content areas and grade levels nationwide. Join us to learn more about this information age survival skill. As a result of this session, teachers will: 1. Understand the importance of teaching media literacy in the classroom; 2. Explore media literacy resources; and 3. Learn to use the five key questions of media literacy when planning lessons. This session is appropriate for teachers at all technology levels.

tag(s): media literacy (90), professional development (314)

In the Classroom

The archive of this teacher-friendly, hands-on webinar will empower and inspire you to use learning technology in the classroom and for professional productivity. As appropriate, specific classroom examples and ideas have been shared. View the session with a few of your teaching colleagues to find and share new ideas. Find additional information and links to tools at the session resource page. Learn more about OK2Ask and upcoming sessions here.

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Resources related to Source Reliability/Checking Sources - TeachersFirst

Grades
K to 12
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As educators, we must teach our students how to make sure the resources they are using are reliable. This collection includes information and resources related to checking sources and...more
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As educators, we must teach our students how to make sure the resources they are using are reliable. This collection includes information and resources related to checking sources and determining if a source is reliable and credible.

tag(s): media literacy (90), Research (65)

In the Classroom

We have included resources for all grades. Remember, our "In the Classroom" suggestions with each reviewed resource, give you ideas about using these tools in your classroom.

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Curation Resources - TeachersFirst

Grades
K to 12
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Discover resources in this collection for your students to use to curate resources. Curation means selecting, collecting, organizing, and presenting content. Curating is especially...more
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Discover resources in this collection for your students to use to curate resources. Curation means selecting, collecting, organizing, and presenting content. Curating is especially helpful when researching a topic but always useful to help students to keep information systematically arranged. We have included resources for all grades.

tag(s): curation (27), organizational skills (91), Research (65)

In the Classroom

Share these resources with your students to use when curating materials for projects and lessons. Share a link to this collection on your school web page and in your school newsletter (or email). Find resources to incorporate into your lessons.

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Tales from the Griots - The Mali Empire - TeachersFirst

Grades
6 to 12
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Tales from the Griots - Mali Empire is part of the TeachersFirst Help! I lost my media/library specialist collection found here...more
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Tales from the Griots - Mali Empire is part of the TeachersFirst Help! I lost my media/library specialist collection found here that features topics and resources that focus on integrating research with technology. This resource begins with introducing the Mali Empire that existed in Africa for over 400 years and continues with additional background information. Following the background information is a list of book suggestions and videos that include suggested classroom teaching ideas. The included extension activity suggests comparing and contrasting the Mali Empire with other civilizations.

tag(s): africa (140)

In the Classroom

Use the ideas and resources found in this article to enhance your lessons on ancient civilizations or provide information for a new teaching unit. In addition to the suggestions already seen on the article, consider using technology tools to help students curate resources, organize information, and share their learning. Wakelet, reviewed here, is an excellent tool for curating resources into shareable collections. Use Wakelet individually or collaboratively when working on research projects. Use CirclyApp, reviewed here, as a graphic organizer to help students understand and compare the Mali Empire with other civilizations. CirclyApp is an excellent visual tool that includes several useful templates to compare and contrast information easily. As students prepare to share their learning, consider the options found at Genially, reviewed here, for students to create interactive presentations, infographics, charts, and more. Resources correlate to ISTE and AASL National School Library Standards.
 This resource requires PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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Votes for Women - The 19th Amendment - TeachersFirst

Grades
4 to 12
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Votes for Women - The 19th Amendment is part of the TeachersFirst Help! I lost my media/library specialist collection found here...more
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Votes for Women - The 19th Amendment is part of the TeachersFirst Help! I lost my media/library specialist collection found here that features topics and resources that focus on integrating research with technology. Information begins with a short introductory paragraph about the 19th Amendment and extensive background information. The Activities section shares suggested book lists, primary sources, and a WebQuest research project. Continue down the site to find Extension activities that incorporate research skills into additional classroom opportunities such as debates and documentary creation. Ideas found on this resource include correlation to ISTE and AASL National School Library Standards.

tag(s): 1900s (56), constitution (84), women (108), womens suffrage (35)

In the Classroom

Begin by browsing through the many suggested classroom activities found in this resource. Organize a suggested book list or research resources for students using a curation tool like Symbaloo, reviewed here, as means for organizing information into one place. Sort items in your Symbaloo by using the color-coding option for the icons. For example, make book suggestions blue, primary source links yellow, etc. As students prepare to share their research and final projects, provide options for sharing information. Suggest students make a presentation with Google Slides, reviewed here, a video using Adobe Creative Cloud Express Video Maker, reviewed here, or a multimedia presentation created with Sway, reviewed here.
 This resource requires PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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Twitter Chat: Research Skills Round Up - TeachersFirst

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K to 12
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This archived Twitter chat is from February 2022 and will open in Wakelet. The title of this chat is Research Skills Round-Up. During this chat, participants will: 1. Discuss the ...more
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This archived Twitter chat is from February 2022 and will open in Wakelet. The title of this chat is Research Skills Round-Up. During this chat, participants will: 1. Discuss the purpose of research in the classroom, 2. Explore research strategies and resources for use in the classroom, and 3. Share ideas for integrating student research across the curriculum.

tag(s): Research (65), twitterchatarchive (143)

In the Classroom

Find resources and information about research skills. Share this chat with your colleagues looking for strategies and resources on research skills.

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Deceptive Detective - Common Sense

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2 to 12
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Deceptive Detective is a colorful poster available to download as a PDF that provides questions to ask when looking at news sources. Prompts encourage students to consider the source...more
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Deceptive Detective is a colorful poster available to download as a PDF that provides questions to ask when looking at news sources. Prompts encourage students to consider the source of information, its presentation, date of publication, and more. Select the link above the poster to view the file in its entirety. This poster is part of Common Sense's News & Literacy Toolkit, reviewed here.

tag(s): bias (18), computers (97), internet safety (109), journalism (69), media literacy (90), news (230), social media (47), STEM (228)

In the Classroom

Print this poster to display in your classroom or computer lab after discussing the information with your students. Use Padlet, reviewed here, to break down the questions found on the poster and share student findings. For example, begin by evaluating a website together as a class. Create a column on your Padlet for each question, then add students' responses in the appropriate column. As students become proficient at evaluating online resources, ask them to use Canva Infographic Maker, reviewed here, to create infographics sharing the validity of websites and online news resources based upon the questions found on the Deceptive Detective poster. Extend learning by asking students to become the instructor through the use of podcasts. Use Buzzsprout, reviewed here, to create bi-weekly or monthly student-created podcasts sharing tips for evaluating websites, how to recognize fake news sources or suggestions for useful resources for student use.
 This resource requires PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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Resources to Nurture Critical Thinking - TeachersFirst

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K to 12
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Nurture critical thinking skills in your classroom using the resources shared in this collection. Critical thinking is a process that includes the ability to interpret, analyze, and...more
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Nurture critical thinking skills in your classroom using the resources shared in this collection. Critical thinking is a process that includes the ability to interpret, analyze, and evaluate information. Thinking critically requires students to infer and solve problems with an open mind. Students use critical thinking skills to observe, experience, communicate and reflect while reading and learning content. As contentious public events spill over into the classroom, teachers need to help students learn how to process perspectives that differ from their own. Use this collection as you are planning your lessons and activities.

tag(s): critical thinking (104), media literacy (90), problem solving (219)

In the Classroom

Help your students to practice critical thinking skills using these engaging resources. Share these resources with your colleagues and school parents by emailing the page or sharing the link from your school web page and in your school newsletter.

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Global Citizenship Resources - TeachersFirst

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K to 12
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Encourage your students to be global citizens with the resources shared in this collection. Global citizenship helps students to understand both world events and their role within the...more
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Encourage your students to be global citizens with the resources shared in this collection. Global citizenship helps students to understand both world events and their role within the international community. When students begin to become global citizens, they learn to respect universal values such as peace and the human rights of all people. Use this curated list to start your class discussion of global citizenship.

tag(s): collaboration (87), cross cultural understanding (149)

In the Classroom

Help your students to become global citizens using these engaging resources. Find ways to connect with other schools around the country or even around the world. Share these resources with your colleagues and school parents by emailing the page or sharing the link from your school web page and in your school newsletter.

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OK2Ask: Facts Are Facts...Aren't They? - TeachersFirst

Grades
K to 12
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This recording of an OK2Ask online professional learning session is from July 2021. You can register and immediately view the archive of the session.

Can your students tell

...more
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This recording of an OK2Ask online professional learning session is from July 2021. You can register and immediately view the archive of the session.

Can your students tell facts from fiction? Do your digital natives suffer from "digital naivety"? They may be fluent enough with technology to create and post their own work but may not be aware that not everyone who posts online is credible. Teaching students to sift through multiple sets of information allows them to learn the difference between propaganda, advertising, and factual reporting. This is a skill that students need in order to be truly digitally literate. Join us to learn strategies to help your students determine if information is reliable. As a result of this session, teachers will: 1. Explore tools and strategies for teaching media literacy; 2. Learn strategies that promote critical examination of online resources; and 3. Plan a learning activity that fosters digital literacy. This session is appropriate for teachers at all technology levels.

tag(s): media literacy (90), professional development (314)

In the Classroom

The archive of this teacher-friendly, hands-on webinar will empower and inspire you to use learning technology in the classroom and for professional productivity. As appropriate, specific classroom examples and ideas have been shared. View the session with a few of your teaching colleagues to find and share new ideas. Find additional information and links to tools at the session resource page. Learn more about OK2Ask and upcoming sessions here.

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Reading Treks: Esperanza Rising - TeachersFirst

Grades
3 to 6
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TeachersFirst Reading Treks create a virtual field trip of resources about a piece of literature or text using the My Maps feature of Google Maps. This Reading Trek provides inspiration...more
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TeachersFirst Reading Treks create a virtual field trip of resources about a piece of literature or text using the My Maps feature of Google Maps. This Reading Trek provides inspiration and suggestions for using the trade book, Esperanza Rising. Use our robust Instructional Guide with students in grades 3-6. Content correlates to Common Core Standards, National Core Arts Standards for Visual Arts, and National Curriculum Standards for Social Studies. Find the entire selection of Reading Treks here.

tag(s): 1920s (8), 1930s (17), great depression (29), hispanic (25), immigrants (30), racism (70)

In the Classroom

Take advantage of the many suggested classroom uses for this resource found on the Instructional Guide (PDF). This book and the suggested activities work well as part of lessons on racism and living conditions in the 1920s and 1930s on Mexican farms. Consider using the historical information and primary sources from the book to have students create timelines of the important events during the story. Find a variety of free online timeline creation tools located here. Use Google My Maps, reviewed here to create and share custom maps. As students conduct research related to life on Mexican farms during the 1920s and 1930s, use Fiskkit, reviewed here as a collaborative discussion tool. Use Fiskkit to share the link of any online article with students, then the site's tools provide the opportunity to highlight and add comments to areas within the article by users.
 This resource requires PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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Social Media Resources - TeachersFirst

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K to 12
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Social media in education offers students the ability to connect with learning groups and easily find useful information. As educators, it is pivotal to teach students the benefits...more
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Social media in education offers students the ability to connect with learning groups and easily find useful information. As educators, it is pivotal to teach students the benefits of using social media, as well as the proper (and safe) way to use these types of tools. This collection provides professional learning for educators using social media in the classroom, tools to organize and share social media, plus some social media favorites (such as Twitter and Pinterest).

tag(s): social media (47)

In the Classroom

Explore this collection to find tools for yourself (and your students) to use to connect with others and find information using social media.

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Wikipedia Timeline Generator - Class Tools

Grades
3 to 12
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Create an instant, editable timeline from Wikipedia pages with this handy resource from Class Tools. Input a name or event into the search bar and watch your timeline come to ...more
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Create an instant, editable timeline from Wikipedia pages with this handy resource from Class Tools. Input a name or event into the search bar and watch your timeline come to life as you scroll through events in chronological order. Customize your timeline using the edit feature to add additional information or delete unwanted occurrences or information. Share your timeline using the included links to social media sites, send by email, or use the print icon to print your timeline.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): timelines (45)

In the Classroom

Bookmark and save this handy tool for many classroom uses. Displayed through a visual timeline, this is an excellent way for students to look at information and provide context through the order of events. Create a timeline to share on your interactive whiteboard when studying historical characters and events. Use the editing tool to narrow down information by specific dates or delete items irrelevant to your lesson. Ask students to compare and contrast people or events to help them get perspective on events leading up to important moments in history. For example, create a timeline for Thomas Jefferson and another for Alexander Hamilton and ask students to compare and contrast important events in their lives and consider how these impacted their view on America's founding principles. Have students share their reflections and information on a simple webpage created using Carrd, reviewed here. Expand learning further by asking students to use a presentation tool such as Sway, reviewed here, to demonstrate understanding. Ask students to include a link to their Wikipedia timeline along with images, Venn diagram comparisons, and other information found during their research. You can even use this tool for classic novels! Try searching Gone With the Wind..

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How To Evaluate Websites: A Guide For Teachers And Students (Free Poster) - Kathleen Morris

Grades
6 to 12
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This blog post from an Australian educator provides a useful flow chart for quickly evaluating websites using a step by step process. In addition to the printable chart, the author...more
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This blog post from an Australian educator provides a useful flow chart for quickly evaluating websites using a step by step process. In addition to the printable chart, the author includes an expanded discussion on each part of the flow chart that explains the importance of each step.

tag(s): charts and graphs (165), Research (65)

In the Classroom

As mentioned in the blog, it is natural to move around through several sites when conducting research. Having a specific process to use when deciding to spend more time helps students (and adults) become more effective with their time and resources. Share this site and the poster with your students as you discuss Internet search and research methods. Print the poster and have students include it with their research journals to use as a guide. Use this flow chart as a model for students to create their own guides for research using Canva Infographic Maker, reviewed here. Create guides for following the process from start to finish of creating a research report, finding and choosing research items, or evaluating educational games.

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Fake News: Misinformation, Disinformation, and Malinformation - Pace University

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4 to 12
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This helpful page provides information to help you understand how to verify news resources for research purposes. This resource guides the readers through suggested tips on how to stay...more
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This helpful page provides information to help you understand how to verify news resources for research purposes. This resource guides the readers through suggested tips on how to stay alert and recognize fake news. Be sure to look at Real New About Fake News and Other Resources of Interest. Use this resource as a news consumer's handbook that includes ways to identify and recognized fake news stories and resources.

tag(s): digital citizenship (79), internet safety (109), journalism (69), media literacy (90), news (230), Research (65)

In the Classroom

Include this article with your other resources for teaching how to navigate online information. Include this website within a learning management system such as ActivelyLearn, reviewed here, to build a complete learning unit that includes articles, videos, and assessments that fully immerse and engage students in the learning activities. Enhance learning throughout the school year using Padlet, reviewed here, to curate and organize online information. For example, create a Padlet that includes a column for each of the four categories of fake news mentioned on this website, then ask students to share examples found during online use. Extend learning by asking students to become the teacher through presentations on how to recognize and avoid fake news. Provide a variety of options for student presentations including a comic creation tool like ToonyTool, reviewed here, Binumi, reviewed here, to create simple video explainers, or use Minecraft Education Edition, reviewed here, and have students create a game to teach the hazards of disinformation.

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