TeachersFirst - Featured Sites: Week of Jun 23, 2024

Here are this week's features. Clicking the tags in the description area of each listing will present a list of other resources with this topic. | Click here to return to the Featured Sites Archive

 

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CapCut - CapCut

Grades
6 to 12
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CapCut is an all-in-one video editing platform that provides tools for creating, editing, and sharing videos. The website offers various features such as editing tools, AI-driven options...more
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CapCut is an all-in-one video editing platform that provides tools for creating, editing, and sharing videos. The website offers various features such as editing tools, AI-driven options like background removal and color correction, and templates for different social media platforms. You can access CapCut online, download it for desktop use, or use the mobile app to edit videos. The platform also supports team collaboration and provides resources for enhancing video content with music, texts, and effects.

tag(s): digital storytelling (144), social media (54), video (256)

In the Classroom

Have students create short biography videos of historical figures, integrating photos, text, and voiceovers using CapCut. They can document their science experiments through video, using CapCut to add captions explaining each step. This method engages students and enhances comprehension of scientific concepts. Have students craft Public Service Announcements (PSAs) about topics like bullying, the environment, or other social issues using CapCut to edit and share their message. These can be shared on the school's social media accounts. Teachers can use CapCut to create teaser videos that can be used to peak students' interest for an upcoming unit of study.

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Be MediaWise - Lessons to Teach Media Literacy - PBS Learning Media

Grades
6 to 12
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Be MediaWise--Lessons to Teach Media Literacy is a series of media literacy lessons designed to teach students to fact-check information found online. The collection consists of engaging...more
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Be MediaWise--Lessons to Teach Media Literacy is a series of media literacy lessons designed to teach students to fact-check information found online. The collection consists of engaging videos featuring teens evaluating various online sources. The videos are short and give relevant examples of how to evaluate posts on social media, spot satire, and identify content that may be created by artificial intelligence.

tag(s): critical thinking (112), media literacy (104), social media (54)

In the Classroom

Teach your middle and high school students how to critically evaluate information with each video's downloadable lesson plans, handouts, and slide decks. Lessons include evaluating actual posts on social media, video, and news sites. Create deeper understanding and extend learning by having your students create "social media" posts using tools such as Canva for Education, reviewed here, or Adobe Creative Cloud Express for Education, reviewed here, then, evaluate classmates' work.

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My Social Media Life - Common Sense Education

Grades
6 to 9
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This lesson provides resources for guiding middle-school students in learning about the role of social media in their lives, especially the effect of social media on relationships....more
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This lesson provides resources for guiding middle-school students in learning about the role of social media in their lives, especially the effect of social media on relationships. The lesson plan takes approximately forty-five minutes to complete; however, an alternative suggestion shares a fifteen-minute quick activity. Resources provided include a slide presentation, video, student handouts, and family take-home information. Also available is the correlation to Common Core ELA, CASEL, AASL, and ISTE Standards. You will need to sign in to access this free lesson and resources.

tag(s): digital citizenship (92), social and emotional learning (86), social media (54)

In the Classroom

Bookmark and save this lesson plan for use with lessons on media literacy, social media, or social-emotional learning. Engage students by creating visual mindmaps or flow charts using Coggle, reviewed here. For example, create a mind map with different social platforms and ask students to share the pros and cons of using each tool. Use a flow chart to share suggestions on how to address common issues that occur through the use of social media and relationships. As a final activity, ask students to create interesting video presentations using Typito, reviewed here. Typito's drag and drop interface includes free templates, drag and drop features, and the ability to personalize and share content easily.
 This resource requires PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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Digital Citizenship: Technological Literacy - PBS Learning Media

Grades
K to 12
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Proper use and understanding of using technology responsibly are essential for all students to acquire. This offering from PBS Learning Media focuses on Digital Citizenship concerning...more
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Proper use and understanding of using technology responsibly are essential for all students to acquire. This offering from PBS Learning Media focuses on Digital Citizenship concerning technological literacy. Each of the fifty-three included videos helps students understand concepts such as understanding the role of influencers on social media, editorial accuracy, and why many people are susceptible to disinformation. Each video is relatively short in length, running from around five to fifteen minutes. Look for the icon with "SM" located at the bottom of some of the descriptions; these videos include additional support materials for use in the classroom.

tag(s): digital citizenship (92), internet safety (114), journalism (72), social media (54)

In the Classroom

Take advantage of the many videos and resources found on this site to include with your digital citizenship lessons. Engage students in learning about digital citizenship using playposit, reviewed here, to add notes, questions, and student-teacher interactions to any video. Enhance the learning experience by including these videos and your other resources into a digital lesson using Curipod, reviewed here. Extend learning by asking students to share their learning using different technology tools. For example, have some students create a podcast using Buzzsprout, reviewed here, while others create and share video presentations made with Animoto, reviewed here.
 This resource requires PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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A History of Ideas - BBC Radio

Grades
9 to 12
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A History of Ideas is a weekly podcast dedicated to discussions of the work and theories of philosophers. Host Melvyn Bragg and his guests explore everyday topics through the lens ...more
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A History of Ideas is a weekly podcast dedicated to discussions of the work and theories of philosophers. Host Melvyn Bragg and his guests explore everyday topics through the lens of philosophy content. You can use the search function to find fairly recent topics such as the role of social media in how individuals adapt their persona according to their audience and Aristotle's Guide to the Good Life as it relates to contemporary living. Podcasts include animated videos and are available to explore by theme. Included is an archive of past episodes dating back to 2018.

tag(s): ethics (23), gifted (65), podcasts (86), video (256)

In the Classroom

Include this podcast in your philosophy classrooms or as a critical thinking activity within gifted and talented classrooms. Introduce the work of philosophers and philosophical discussions through the use of student choice boards. For example, create a Wakelet collection, reviewed here, that provides links to several different topics found in the podcast archives and allow students (or student groups) to use that as a starting point for their activity. Ask students to use Wakelet to create a collaborative collection that includes information based on their research. Items might include videos, articles, and websites that support all sides of their philosophical discussion. As a final extended learning activity, have students create animated presentations using Presentious, reviewed here. For example, have students use the template created as an "Influencer Marketing Proposal" as a starting point for convincing others that their philosophy is the correct way to look at the information.

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Teachers' Guide to Cranky Uncle - John Cook

Grades
6 to 12
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How do you teach students to understand and build resilience against misinformation? Try using this game created by George Mason University scientist John Cook which uses cartoon personifications...more
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How do you teach students to understand and build resilience against misinformation? Try using this game created by George Mason University scientist John Cook which uses cartoon personifications of climate science denials. The game is available to play on any browser or download the app from the Apple Store or Google Play. By teaching how others use fake experts and cherry-picking information to spread disinformation, this game engages players as they employ critical thinking skills to build points and learn how to separate fact from myth. The Teacher's Guide features all you need to know to understand how to set up the game for your class, the basic premise and information found in the game, and classroom activities that accompany the game's features.

tag(s): DAT device agnostic tool (143), digital citizenship (92), evaluating sources (27), game based learning (175), internet safety (114), media literacy (104), social media (54)

In the Classroom

Add this game to your toolkit of lessons and activities when teaching Internet safety and media literacy skills. The Teachers' Guide already includes many ideas on integrating the game into classroom lessons and includes using technology to enhance and extend learning. Use these ideas as a starting point to build student engagement and help them understand the real-world applications for the information found in the game. For example, use the suggested Padlet, reviewed here, activity to compile quiz questions as suggested in Activity 5. After completing that activity, have students create their own videos, fake social media posts, or news articles that contain misinformation and create quiz questions for their peers to complete. Adobe Creative Cloud Express for Education, reviewed here, is an excellent tool for students to use when creating websites, flyers, and infographics. As a final project, and to extend learning, have students share what they learned with others by producing podcasts using Buzzsprout, reviewed here, or digital books for younger students using Book Creator, reviewed here.

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Koji - Koji

Grades
K to 12
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Koji is an interactive content creator for all types of social media. Create games and quizzes by creating a template or remixing one of the thousands of available models on ...more
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Koji is an interactive content creator for all types of social media. Create games and quizzes by creating a template or remixing one of the thousands of available models on the website. Choose an existing game and click the remix button to begin. Customize the options, including text, sound, images, and game features. Publish and share using the game link or directly into social media using the provided links.

tag(s): coding (90), game based learning (175), gamification (76)

In the Classroom

Find templates by browsing the templates found on the home page, or choose the option to see what others are remixing to find examples to use in the classroom. Modify quizzes to include on your class website for quick review and practice on any device. Choose a "tap to reveal" feature to share before introducing a new unit. For example, before starting a unit on national landmarks, quickly create several "tap to reveal" games with United States landmarks and publish one a day on the week before the start of your unit. Have students create quizzes and games to review classroom material, then share the games with all students on your class websites. Share with students interested in software and coding applications, encourage them to create games that interact with current classroom materials. Koji includes options for viewing the source code for advanced coders to use in creating and modifying their interactives.

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Social Media Test Drive - Cornell University and the Cornell Research Foundation, Inc

Grades
4 to 12
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Social Media Test Drive provides a series of interactive modules offering practice in digital citizenship skills through a social media simulation. Each module includes tutorials, guided...more
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Social Media Test Drive provides a series of interactive modules offering practice in digital citizenship skills through a social media simulation. Each module includes tutorials, guided activities, and opportunities for reflection. Topics include how to shape your digital footprint, online privacy, addressing cyberbullies, and how to recognize and identify "fake news." The Teacher's Guide provides ideas on using the site along with key terms and information found within the modules.

tag(s): character education (75), cyberbullying (41), digital citizenship (92), social media (54)

In the Classroom

Share these modules for students to complete during any lessons on Internet safety. Ask students to contribute to a collaborative document sharing examples they have seen of cyberbullying or deceptive news practice. Replace pencil and paper notetaking by sharing an online tool such as Webnote, reviewed here, for students to use to take notes on any website. When finished, have them share their notes using the URL created for use in classroom discussions. Reinforce online safety concepts through gameplay using Baamboozle, reviewed here. Enhance student learning by asking students to create a game in Baamboozle for their peers to play to identify best practices in creating a safe online presence. After completing your digital safety unit, modify classroom technology use and extend learning by asking students to create explainer videos using FlexClip, reviewed here, with suggestions on how to identify fake news, how to create a positive digital footprint or ways to support peers when faced with cyberbullying. Share student videos on your class website and with younger students.

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Bad News - Cambridge Social Decision-Making Lab and DROG

Grades
5 to 12
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How bad can you be? This game teaches you how fake news and disinformation spreads as players take on the role of the bad guy to acquire as many followers ...more
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How bad can you be? This game teaches you how fake news and disinformation spreads as players take on the role of the bad guy to acquire as many followers as possible while raising their credibility ratings. Follow the prompts and make selections on how to spread disinformation and take advantage of others' fears and emotions as you proceed through the game. As you make choices, watch how that affects the number of your followers and learn how to use celebrity and fear to influence others. Throughout the game, players earn up to six badges recognizing accomplishments such as impersonation and emotion.

tag(s): digital citizenship (92), game based learning (175), internet safety (114), media literacy (104), social media (54)

In the Classroom

This game is perfect for use as an introduction to lessons on digital citizenship, media literacy, and social media. Share the site with your students to explore on their own and encourage them to play several different times using the different options provided. Your students won't mind playing over and over; it is easy to get hooked on trying to find the best way to gain as many followers as possible! Once students become familiar with the game and the different options presented for spreading misinformation, ask them to apply their findings to online content. Have them do some online research to find sites or information using tactics such as emotion and the others featured in Bad News. As they research sites and online information, have them add links to the sites they find on a class Padlet. Padlet, reviewed here, offers an option to create columns, use this option then label a column for each badge found in the game and ask students to share a link to their sites in the appropriate column. In addition to adding a link, have students include a comment providing information on why their site belongs in the category. Instead of assessing learning with quizzes or a written report, enhance learning and transform your assessment by having students create infographics to share information learned. Canva Infographic Maker, reviewed here, provides easy to use templates to create interesting and informative infographics. Extend leaning and ask students to become the teacher using Symbaloo Learning Paths, reviewed here, to create an online learning activity teaching others on how to recognize and avoid disinformation found online. Be sure to share your assessment rubric with students as part of your assignment. Find many ideas for implementing rubrics for assessment along with examples and online tools at TeachersFirst Rubrics to the Rescue, reviewed here.

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Online Teen Safety - StaySafe.org

Grades
5 to 12
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This guide shares online safety suggestions for teens and parents by providing basic facts and advice. Starting with tips for protecting hardware and devices from viruses and malware...more
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This guide shares online safety suggestions for teens and parents by providing basic facts and advice. Starting with tips for protecting hardware and devices from viruses and malware the site guides readers through a variety of valuable information. Additional topics include social media, scams and online shopping, and online bullying. Although the site lacks a lot of bells and whistles, it offers a great deal of information related to online safety and provides a starting point for further research.

tag(s): cyberbullying (41), internet safety (114), social media (54)

In the Classroom

Include the information from this site with your other resources for teaching about online safety. Instead of creating a list of links for students, share safety tips with students by replacing the list using a bookmarking tool like Padlet, reviewed here, to share all resources including videos, websites, and more in one place. Invite students to add their own resources to the Padlet as a collaborative activity on internet safety. Create quizzes using Baamboozle, reviewed here, as a formative assessment during your online safety unit. Baamboozle is a quick and easy quiz creation tool to replace paper and pencil. Divide the class into groups to research the different topics found on this site then let them create their own Baamboozle quizzes for their classmates. Instead of teaching online safety in individual lessons, consider using Symbaloo Learning Paths, reviewed here, to create a learning path including all of your lessons. Have students follow at their own pace and use tools with the Learning Paths to offer differentiation for the abilities and interests of your students. To modify learning and further challenge students, have them create their own internet safety Learning Paths for classmates to complete.

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vistacreate - Depositphotos

Grades
K to 12
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vistacreate is a visual editor for creating social media images, banners, animated designs, infografics, timelines, videos, and more. Choose from vistacreate's extensive library of...more
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vistacreate is a visual editor for creating social media images, banners, animated designs, infografics, timelines, videos, and more. Choose from vistacreate's extensive library of templates and photos (type in your theme) or use your own. Select the type of media to create to begin a project, open your workspace, and personalize different features. Click the Tutorials tab on the top menu to see How to Get Started and more. Create an account using email to download and share finished projects.

tag(s): digital storytelling (144), graphic design (48), images (257), infographics (58), posters (42), slides (42), social media (54), timelines (52)

In the Classroom

Share vistacreate with students as a tool for creating posters, infographics, videos, and other visual media for any project. Begin by displaying this site on your interactive whiteboard and demonstrating how to use the different features and discussing how to find the free materials available. Have students create a screencast using Free Screen Recorder Online, reviewed here, to demonstrate how to use the different features of vistacreate and include their screencasts on your class website for student use at home and at school. Instead of a book report, have students create a simple webpage; use WebNode, reviewed here, and include a banner or poster created using vistacreate to share their ideas. Ask students to use this site to create an infographic sharing nutrition facts, events in world history, or any other information learned in class.

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Above the Noise - KQED

Grades
6 to 12
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This YouTube Channel, created for middle and high school students digs deeper into issues (environmental, health, social and more) affecting their lives. Based on science and research,...more
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This YouTube Channel, created for middle and high school students digs deeper into issues (environmental, health, social and more) affecting their lives. Based on science and research, episodes provide information to help teens make informed conclusions on topics like fake news and social media. Just below the video link see the discussion questions for use before, during, and after videos. You can also click the PBS Learning Media link to find standards-aligned free lesson plans, viewing guides, transcripts, and more for each episode. If your district blocks YouTube, the videos may not be viewable.

tag(s): character education (75), drugs and alcohol (27), social media (54), social networking (65), social skills (22), sociology (22), video (256)

In the Classroom

Take advantage of the educator guide by clicking the link to the PBS Learning section for your selection and explore big questions found within each episode. Subscribe to this channel to receive notifications of new video additions. Use a tool such as MoocNote, reviewed here, to add questions directly into the YouTube videos for students to complete as a blended, flipped, or remote learning lesson and before (classroom) instruction. Use a tool such as Voxer, reviewed here, for students to discuss their thoughts on the topic of each video.

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The Guide to Pinterest for Educators - USC Rossier/Leah Anne Levy

Grades
K to 12
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The Guide to Pinterest for Educators is an excellent resource for teachers and administrators with tips and information for managing Pinterest as a powerful learning tool. Divided into...more
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The Guide to Pinterest for Educators is an excellent resource for teachers and administrators with tips and information for managing Pinterest as a powerful learning tool. Divided into eight sections this handbook discusses the basics of pinning, organization, collaboration, and more. Each section is short and simple to read, making this an outstanding guide for using Pinterest as part of your professional planning and teaching tools.

tag(s): bookmarks (46), professional development (392), social media (54)

In the Classroom

Use this resource to understand how to use Pinterest for your personal and professional use and also for student collaboration. Share ideas with other staff members to collaborate on shared interests. Discuss one section a month with your professional learning network (PLN) and reflect together how to make the most of Pinterest in your educational setting.

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