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Crowd Buzzer - Crowd Buzzer

Grades
K to 12
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Crowd Buzzer is a virtual game buzzer that lets players buzz in from any digital device and lets others see who buzzed in first and the order of other players. ...more
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Crowd Buzzer is a virtual game buzzer that lets players buzz in from any digital device and lets others see who buzzed in first and the order of other players. No more wondering who hit that buzzer first! Begin by giving your game a name, then look for the game code in the upper left portion of the page. Next, provide players a link to the Crowd Buzzer site, located here, and ask them to enter the game code. In addition to the game code, players add their name and the optional team name if desired before joining. Next, turn the buzzer on and off from the hosting site; for example, turn off buzzers while reading a question, and turn them on when ready for responses. Finally, players click the buzz button on their screens, and the host receives a list of names in the order they buzz in. Crowd Buzzer allows up to 100 players per game.

tag(s): game based learning (158), Teacher Utilities (127)

In the Classroom

Crowd Buzzer is perfect for many in-person and virtual activities. For example, use Crowd Buzzer to engage students at the start of a lesson to review previous concepts or as an exit ticket activity at the end of class. Enhance learning by including students as the host of activities, ask groups to share information with their peers, and host a Crowd Buzzer game to have other students provide answers to questions they create. Extend learning by asking students to become the teacher and share a project-based learning activity using Crowd Buzzer as a virtual learning activity that includes students and adults. An example would be a student project to understand food waste in the cafeteria. Students share a slide presentation created with Google Slides, reviewed here, or prepare a Wakelet collection, reviewed here, with information found in their research, and then provide an interactive presentation that includes opportunities for administrators and students to buzz in to respond to questions based on statistics learned as part of the students' research presentation.

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