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Social Justice Standards: Unpacking Identity - Tolerance.org

Grades
8 to 12
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Delve into the essential questions of how identity develops and how it affects our relationships with this professional development topic from Teaching Tolerance. This lesson teaches...more
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Delve into the essential questions of how identity develops and how it affects our relationships with this professional development topic from Teaching Tolerance. This lesson teaches the five identity anchor standards and how identity affects relationships in a school and classrooms. Use the charts as a reflection piece to focus on your identity and learn through school-related scenarios on how to apply and teach anti-bias standards to students.

tag(s): character education (56), cross cultural understanding (148), difficult conversations (5), empathy (8), identity (5), professional development (260), racism (40)

In the Classroom

Use this course as an introduction to understanding bias and identity from both a personal and professional level. Adapt information from this course to include in your lessons on racism, empathy, and difficult conversations. For example, use the images and charts in the application section to identify and understand that first impression and physical characteristics don't always provide a complete picture of another person's identity. Include these activities as part of a larger teaching unit using a learning management system such as Crio, reviewed here. Crio includes many options for building interactive lessons that promote critical thinking skills through various response formats, media options, and teacher feedback.

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Mini Lesson: Identity Iceberg - Anti-Defamation League

Grades
8 to 12
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This 15-minute interactive lesson for educators explores the concept of identity and the challenge of avoiding stereotypes as a way to recognize bias. Load the mini-lesson to begin...more
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This 15-minute interactive lesson for educators explores the concept of identity and the challenge of avoiding stereotypes as a way to recognize bias. Load the mini-lesson to begin the self-paced interactive activity. As you engage in the mini-lesson, learn about self-identity through activities that engage you in considering different parts of your identity, both seen and unseen. Application activities guide viewers further by providing specific methods for getting to know others without bias or forming opinions based upon looks.

tag(s): character education (56), empathy (8), identity (5)

In the Classroom

Use this interactive as a professional guide to understand the concept of identity and stereotypes and as inspiration on how to guide students through the topics of empathy, bias, and racism. This mini-lesson uses Padlet, reviewed here, for you to share your thoughts and reflections upon the lesson. Use Padlet as part of your lessons for students to share their thoughts and reflection as part of your ongoing discussions. Ask students to share examples of bias found in the media on a Padlet and discuss strategies for recognizing bias. Extend learning further by asking students to create infographics sharing different ways to recognize bias and use of stereotypes. Canva Infographic Maker, reviewed here, has a large selection of infographic templates for students to use and modify. When finished, share infographics on your class web page or as part of a digital collection shared on a webpage created with Carrd, reviewed here.

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Whiteness Project: Millenials in Dallas, Texas - Whitney Dow

Grades
9 to 12
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The Whiteness Project features a series of interviews with millennials from Dallas, Texas. The short video interviews share their understanding of their whiteness. At the end of each...more
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The Whiteness Project features a series of interviews with millennials from Dallas, Texas. The short video interviews share their understanding of their whiteness. At the end of each interview, a statistic providing context is shared to encourage the viewing audience's self-reflection. View all of the statistics used on the site by selecting the data link at the top of the page.

tag(s): character education (56), civil rights (142), cross cultural understanding (148), cultures (116), difficult conversations (5), empathy (8), racism (40)

In the Classroom

The Whiteness Project provides a unique and interesting resource for introducing and discussing difficult topics in the classroom, including racism, prejudice, bias, and empathy. Share this site with students and provide them time to listen to some of the conversations and the provided statistics. Encourage students to choose one statistic as a starting point for additional research. For example, one piece of data shared is the number of adults who have two or more races in their background. This provides a starting point for researching race in your community, state, or in the country. As students complete research, ask them to share their findings in a multimedia presentation using a tool like Sway, reviewed here, to add graphs, charts, images, and video that support their findings.

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Code Switch - National Public Radio (NPR)

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9 to 12
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Code Switch is an NPR podcast featuring conversations about race that air several times each month. The podcast includes a wide variety of topics ranging from politics to sports and...more
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Code Switch is an NPR podcast featuring conversations about race that air several times each month. The podcast includes a wide variety of topics ranging from politics to sports and much more. The podcast hosts include award-winning journalists from a variety of races to share their perspectives on current issues. Podcasts range in length from approximately 20 minutes to just under one hour. Each podcast link includes a transcript, download link, and embed code.

tag(s): black history (77), character education (56), difficult conversations (5), native americans (88), racism (40)

In the Classroom

Include this podcast as a resource for lessons on racism, bias, or when facing difficult conversations in the classroom. Be sure to sign up to listen to the newest podcasts on your favorite resource and scroll through the archives to find relevant recordings beginning in 2016. As students listen to podcasts, use Google Slides, reviewed here, to create a reflective document for students to share important information from the podcast along with any questions or information for further research. Use the podcasts as a model for students to create their own podcasts on any topic. Search ReadWriteThink, reviewed here, to find many tools to help students develop interesting podcasts including rubrics, podcast tutorials, and a lesson plan for teaching with podcasts. When students are ready to record and share their podcasts, Buzzsprout, reviewed here, is a free podcasting tool that provides options for scheduling broadcasts, adding chapters, and much more.

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Spent - Urban Ministries of Durham

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8 to 12
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Spent is an online game that teaches the challenges of poverty and the difficult choices facing low-income earners. Throughout the game, players make choices related to income options...more
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Spent is an online game that teaches the challenges of poverty and the difficult choices facing low-income earners. Throughout the game, players make choices related to income options and spending needs. Choices include decisions that affect the health, education, and living conditions of the player's family. The game ends when you run out of money or reach the end of the month.

tag(s): character education (56), difficult conversations (5), empathy (8), financial literacy (108)

In the Classroom

Include Spent as a learning resource to include with your lessons on empathy or difficult conversations. Ask students to spend time playing Spent as a way to explore how choices they make affect their living situation. Ask students to take a screen recording of a difficult choice they make while playing Spent and discuss their thinking behind the option chosen. Use Screencast-o-matic, reviewed here, to record and share student's recordings. If you teach older high school students, use Spent to introduce a research unit into understanding poverty in your community. Have students share their learning using multimedia presentation tools like Adobe Spark for Education, reviewed here, or Visme, reviewed here.

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Making it Meaningful: Interrupting Biased Comments in the Classroom - Rosalind Wiseman

Grades
K to 12
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How do you address racially insensitive, homophobic, or other biased comments in your classroom? This article shares tips for handling these comments through immediate responses that...more
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How do you address racially insensitive, homophobic, or other biased comments in your classroom? This article shares tips for handling these comments through immediate responses that turn into teachable moments. Whether you only have time for a quick response, or if you have time for a more meaningful lesson, these ideas provide opportunities to turn the comments into moments for reflection and change.

tag(s): bullying (54), character education (56), difficult conversations (5), empathy (8), identity (5), racism (40)

In the Classroom

All classrooms face difficult conversations at some point; bookmark this article to use as inspiration on how to address those moments. Even if you don't have time for an extended lesson, encourage students to think beyond the moment by creating a Padlet, reviewed here, that curates and shares resources based upon your conversation. For example, one topic discussed in the article is "bonding" teasing and "annoying" teasing. Ask students to share examples of teasing in a Padlet that has columns for each form discussed. Use FlipGrid, reviewed here, as a platform for discussing difficult moments and ask students to share ways to handle biased or insensitive comments.

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Start Empathy Toolkit - Ashoka

Grades
K to 12
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The Start Empathy Toolkit provides a roadmap and materials for teaching empathy to students in all grades. The 85-page downloadable PDF guide focuses on three steps to learning - Prepare,...more
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The Start Empathy Toolkit provides a roadmap and materials for teaching empathy to students in all grades. The 85-page downloadable PDF guide focuses on three steps to learning - Prepare, Engage, and Reflect & Act. Lessons included in the toolkit have suggested time, directions, appropriate grade levels, and materials needed.

tag(s): emotions (44), racism (40), social and emotional learning (37)

In the Classroom

Include lessons and materials found on this site within your classroom to develop empathy and community. Engage students in your activities by creating word clouds of words that promote empathy and understanding using a word cloud creation tool such as WordClouds, reviewed here. Develop those words even further by using Answer Garden, reviewed here, as an anonymous answer response tool. For example, one activity focuses on Appreciating Those Behind the Scenes. Create an Answer Garden poll for students to share specific ideas on those that help behind the scenes and ways to express appreciation for their work. Extend student learning by asking them to create and share ways for others to demonstrate empathy. Provide options for students to create videos using Adobe Spark Video Creator, reviewed here, design digital books using Book Creator, reviewed here, or write a poem using the Poem Generator, reviewed here.
 This resource requires PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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SpeakUp! - Martie Gillin

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5 to 12
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SpeakUp! is a non-profit organization that provides resources to support teens in developing positive relationships with adults. Their programs' focus is on encouraging teens to have...more
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SpeakUp! is a non-profit organization that provides resources to support teens in developing positive relationships with adults. Their programs' focus is on encouraging teens to have supportive conversations that help teens deal with any issues. Register for upcoming programs or learn how to become a SpeakUp! school. Be sure to check out the link to the site's resources that includes helpful guides with contact information for help with many different topics, including suicide, drug abuse, bullying, and more.

tag(s): bullying (54), cyberbullying (48), diseases (78), drugs and alcohol (28), eating disorders (8), sexuality (14), social and emotional learning (37), social media (43)

In the Classroom

Share the resource guides with parents and students on your class website to use when facing any of the covered topics. Use Padlet, reviewed here or Wakelet, reviewed here, to curate and share helpful guides for parents and students within one collection. As you and your class discuss problems that face teens, ask students to use Canva Edu, reviewed here, to share what they learn. For example, have students create posters to display in the classroom that include the dangers of drug abuse and include tips for helping someone that displays signs of drug abuse. Ask other students to design and share infographics that include facts and figures discussing cyberbullying, along with suggestions on how to respond to bullies.
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Facing History and Ourselves - Facing History and Ourselves

Grades
6 to 12
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Using history to connect students to choices made in the past, Facing History provides lessons and curated collections that address racism, bigotry, and prejudice. Visit the Educator...more
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Using history to connect students to choices made in the past, Facing History provides lessons and curated collections that address racism, bigotry, and prejudice. Visit the Educator Resources to browse through videos, lessons, and complete teaching units. Within the same area, explore the many examples and instructions for teaching strategies, including ideas such as character charts and cafe conversations. Learn more at the Professional Development area of Facing History through classroom videos and free one-hour webinars. Educators who complete a workshop, seminar, or course are eligible to use the site's free lending library.

tag(s): bullying (54), civil rights (142), democracy (17), holocaust (45), immigrants (29), immigration (71), journalism (70), martin luther king (34), racism (40), religions (68)

In the Classroom

Discover the many free resources found on this site to include with your teaching units. If you find that some of the reading material is useful, but is above the reading level of your students, use a summarizing tool such as SummarizeThis reviewed here, to break down large portions of text into manageable content. Include activities from this site as part of a larger unit using a learning management system such as Crio, reviewed here. Use Crio to build an interactive learning experience that includes videos, reading activities, quizzes, and images. Extend student learning by asking them to become the creators through sharing their knowledge with others. Provide options for students to create audio podcasts with Synth, reviewed here, make explainer videos using Adobe Spark Video Creator, reviewed here, or use Google My Maps, reviewed here, to take viewers on a virtual journey through map locations.
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Activities for Teaching the 3 Kinds of Empathy - Samantha Du Preez

Grades
K to 12
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Understand the three different forms of empathy and teach students how to respond appropriately using the information shared in this article. As the author describes the different forms...more
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Understand the three different forms of empathy and teach students how to respond appropriately using the information shared in this article. As the author describes the different forms of empathy (cognitive, emotional, and compassionate), she also suggests activities broken into different grade levels using resources found on Everfi, reviewed here.

tag(s): character education (56), emotions (44), social and emotional learning (37)

In the Classroom

Use this article to show students how to develop empathy for others and provide appropriate emotional support to those in need. Engage students in learning about the different forms of empathy by creating mind maps using a creation tool such as Whimsical Mind Maps, reviewed here, to provide a visual representation of how to support others in distress. If you teach younger students, help them understand emotions by creating word clouds at WordClouds, reviewed here, using words provided by students that describe feelings. Extend learning further by creating a Padlet, reviewed here, divided into three columns representing each form of empathy. Ask students to share ideas on recognizing the different forms and methods for showing compassion towards others.

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How to Talk to Kids About Difficult Subjects - Caroline Knorr

Grades
K to 12
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This article uses age and developmental stages as guidelines for sharing ideas on approaching difficult topics with children. Without using specific issues, the author gives general...more
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This article uses age and developmental stages as guidelines for sharing ideas on approaching difficult topics with children. Without using specific issues, the author gives general guidelines for acknowledging children's feelings and methods for reassuring them that everything will be O.K. In addition to the general guidelines, this article also includes specific tips for addressing sexual harassment and social media for tweens and teens.

tag(s): emotions (44), parents (59), preK (289), social and emotional learning (37)

In the Classroom

Share this article with parents to use as a guide when talking to their child about any difficult topic. Consider creating a collection of articles using Wakelet, reviewed here, and share with parents to use at home. Be sure to keep the suggestions in mind for use in the classroom when addressing difficult subjects or as you address controversies that arise throughout the school year.

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Talking to White Kids About Race & Racism - Safe Space Radio

Grades
K to 12
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This hour-long radio program explores how to discuss race and racism with kids of any age through the lens of white parents and students. The radio program provides specific examples...more
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This hour-long radio program explores how to discuss race and racism with kids of any age through the lens of white parents and students. The radio program provides specific examples of how to expose children to people of all races, address children's' questions about race, and tips on how to be aware of situations that provide opportunities to discuss race and racism. In addition to the radio program, the site also includes two PDF documents. The first contains strategies for talking to white kids about racism; the other is a discussion guide with general questions and questions to use with each session segment.

tag(s): character education (56), racism (40)

In the Classroom

Use this radio broadcast as a resource for addressing racism both in the classroom and at home. The program includes short segments with different guests, use the segments to divide information into smaller topics and big ideas. Share a segment with parents along with guiding questions found in the discussion guide and encourage them to use this information to address race in their home as you also address these ideas at school. Use Padlet, reviewed here, to curate and share additional resources for families. As students reflect upon the questions and discussions, have them use Canva Infographic Maker, reviewed here, to create infographics with their ideas for addressing issues of race and racism. Use Google Drawings, reviewed here, as an alternative for younger students to create and share their thoughts through original drawings.
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Today's News, Tomorrow's Lesson - Share My Lesson

Grades
6 to 12
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Today's News, Tomorrow's Lesson brings the latest news and current events into your classroom with timely information, videos, and discussion questions from PBS NewsHour Extra. Select...more
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Today's News, Tomorrow's Lesson brings the latest news and current events into your classroom with timely information, videos, and discussion questions from PBS NewsHour Extra. Select any post to open the resource and read more about the prompt or question. Articles share a summary of the issue along with the video clip from the PBS NewsHour discussion. In addition to discussion questions, this site also includes extension activities to enhance learning. This site doesn't require registration; however, creating an account allows you to save favorites to collections for later use. The videos are hosted on YouTube. If your district blocks YouTube, then they may not be viewable.

tag(s): journalism (70), news (260), politics (106)

In the Classroom

Bookmark this site for use with any current events lessons and as a resource for finding fact-based information to use to help understand modern history. Most of the discussion questions ask students to defend a point of view based on the shared topic. Use technology tools to help students organize their thinking and share their questions and responses. Engage students in the learning process using Fiskkit, reviewed here, as a collaborative discussion tool for sharing online articles related to the topic discussed. Fiskkit offers tools for annotating and collaboratively discussing online information. Share student opinions and discussions using FlipGrid, reviewed here. Ask students to respond to the discussion question within Flipgrid using their fact-based research. Use the comment feature to encourage collaboration and student discussion. As a final project, extend learning by asking students (or student groups) to share their responses as part of a multimedia presentation that includes student writing, videos, maps, and infographics. Have students use a presentation tool such as Sway, reviewed here, or Adobe Spark in K-12, reviewed here, to share their final projects.

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CASEL Program Guides - Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning

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K to 12
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The Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning (CASEL) provides support and tools that include high-quality information for social and emotional learning. The guides...more
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The Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning (CASEL) provides support and tools that include high-quality information for social and emotional learning. The guides shared on this page provide a framework for evaluating social and emotional programs. Choose from two versions of the guides; one is for preschool and elementary programs, the other features the middle and high school edition. For both editions, open the PDF link to view or print the guide. Each guide includes an in-depth discussion of the methods used to rate programs, along with charts with ratings and information on the effectiveness of the programs.

tag(s): professional development (260), social and emotional learning (37)

In the Classroom

The guides shared on this website provide a structured framework for evaluating any social/emotional learning program. Use the information to analyze any programs or tools being considered for use in your classroom. Share this guide with administrators in your district to use when considering implementing new learning programs. Create your own evaluation framework based on this information using Microsoft Excel or Google Sheets to serve as a useful look at the pros and cons of the resource being considered.
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Safe@School - Lesson Plans and Toolkits - USC Rossier

Grades
K to 12
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USC Rossier's online master's in school counseling program provides this extensive collection of resources for helping you to facilitate discussions about race, racism, and diversity...more
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USC Rossier's online master's in school counseling program provides this extensive collection of resources for helping you to facilitate discussions about race, racism, and diversity with students of all ages. Some of the resources are lesson plans, glossaries, toolkits, and others are activities. You don't have to pursue a master's in counseling to use these resources.

tag(s): african american (106), hispanic (15), racism (40)

In the Classroom

Use these resources throughout the school year, and especially when a challenging issue comes up in class. Review these resources to prepare yourself for spontaneous discussions about race and differences. You may want to start the school year with "Claim It! Creating a Climate of Inclusion Lesson Plan," or skim through the list of resources to find one that will fit your lesson and students.

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Teaching About Race and Racism: Lesson Plans Resources - ShareMyLesson

Grades
K to 12
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Curated by ShareMyLesson, find a substantial collection of PreK-12 lesson plans, activities, and resources to help students critically address the issues of race and racism. Racism...more
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Curated by ShareMyLesson, find a substantial collection of PreK-12 lesson plans, activities, and resources to help students critically address the issues of race and racism. Racism Lesson Plans are in categories: Black Lives Matter and George Floyd (which has an anti-racist reading list for children and adults), Professional Development, and General Racism Lesson Plans and Resources. The latter includes lessons about talking with children about race, stereotyping, white supremacy, segregation, lynchings, anti-Semitism, and too many more to name here. Other categories include Lesson Plans: Stereotyping, Racial Profiling, and Related Collections. ShareMyLesson has put together such a rich collection that you won't need to look anywhere else.

tag(s): african american (106), black history (77), hispanic (15), jews (27), racism (40), segregation (17)

In the Classroom

Before sharing this site with students, find a lesson to use as an introduction. Then, show the lesson and its resources on your interactive whiteboard or with a projector, explaining to students all the parts of the lesson as you proceed through it. After this first lesson, enhance student learning by allowing them to choose what lesson or resource they would like to investigate next. Ask students to use Padlet, reviewed here, to register their preference for investigation. If more than one student is interested in the same lesson/resource, allow them to work together. Challenge students to share their extended learning with their peers in a multimedia presentation using Genial.ly, reviewed here, or Sway, reviewed here. Both Sway and Genial.ly will allow your students to create multimedia projects. With Genial.ly you could allow students to choose the type of interactive media they want to develop.

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Students Rebuild - Bezos Family Foundation

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K to 12
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Students Rebuild uses philanthropy to bring students and teachers together using art to build global awareness of issues around the world. Each year Students Rebuild shares a challenge...more
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Students Rebuild uses philanthropy to bring students and teachers together using art to build global awareness of issues around the world. Each year Students Rebuild shares a challenge based upon a critical problem around the world. Sign up to participate to receive details of annual challenges and projects. Past challenges include sharing recipes to fight hunger, creating non-perishable flower garlands in support of children affected by earthquakes in Nepal, and making beads to bring safe drinking water to communities in need. Matching funds for donations are bestowed by the Bezos Foundation and given to supporting partners. Learn more and view free teaching resources for use in K-12 classrooms by visiting the Resources section of Students Rebuild.

tag(s): cross cultural understanding (148), disasters (41)

In the Classroom

Participate in annual challenges to engage students and inspire them to learn more about global issues. Use the provided resources as a starting point for your art projects. Encourage students to learn more about the challenge issue by creating infographics using Canva Infographic Maker, reviewed here. Create infographics together with younger students or ask older students to create their own to share with peers. Enhance learning by using FlipGrid, reviewed here, to locate grid pals from the challenge country. Use Flipgrid to ask questions of students in both countries that encourage the sharing of ideas and understanding of each culture. Extend learning by asking students to use Sway, reviewed here, to share their knowledge and suggestions for solving global issues through writing, video, and other multimedia projects.
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Developing Empathy - Equality and Human Rights Comission

Grades
8 to 12
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This high school level lesson teaches the development of empathy through role-play activities. The activities include slides and student worksheets to download as PDF documents. In...more
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This high school level lesson teaches the development of empathy through role-play activities. The activities include slides and student worksheets to download as PDF documents. In addition to the lesson, extension activities include suggestions for examining your school's anti-bullying policy and ideas to differentiate instruction based upon students' literacy skills.

tag(s): character education (56), emotions (44), social and emotional learning (37)

In the Classroom

The starter activity includes students sharing a time they experienced different feelings. Use AnswerGarden, reviewed here, to post each question and ask students to share their response. This allows students to answer anonymously while still creating a visual word cloud with responses. Copy the embed code to include each of the word clouds on your class website or share using your AnswerGarden poll's link. Include all of the polls within one collaborative Wakelet collection, reviewed here, that includes students' responses to the other lesson activities including written reflections, analysis of your school's bullying policy, and discussions of how to recognize and encourage empathy in others.
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Diversity Toolkit - National Education Association (NEA)

Grades
K to 12
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The Diversity Toolkit provides teaching strategies and resources based on multiple facets of diversity. Explore the topics found on the toolkit to learn more about Cultural Competence...more
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The Diversity Toolkit provides teaching strategies and resources based on multiple facets of diversity. Explore the topics found on the toolkit to learn more about Cultural Competence for Teachers, Class and Income, Social Justice, and more. Each subject includes a short introduction, a discussion of the main issues, and suggestions for teaching strategies. Use the links within each of the issues to find support resources.
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tag(s): civil rights (142), diversity (36), racism (40)

In the Classroom

Use this toolkit to identify different facets of diversity to include in your lessons about social justice and inequalities in society. Consider using Wakelet, reviewed here, as a resource to create and share your lessons with students. Create a Wakelet that includes links to your instructional resources, including videos, online information, and uploaded documents. Include in your Wakelet a link to a different collection that is created as a collaborative space for students to add text responses, videos and reflections. Have students upload a video into the collection directly from Flipgrid, reviewed here. For example, visit this collection entitled "Diving into the Civil Rights."

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Talking About Race and Privilege: Lesson Plan for Middle and High School Students - National Association of School Psychologists (NASP)

Grades
6 to 12
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This lesson plan guides students toward defining the concept of "privilege" and to identify examples of "privilege" in their lives. The lesson begins with using the Webster's Dictionary...more
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This lesson plan guides students toward defining the concept of "privilege" and to identify examples of "privilege" in their lives. The lesson begins with using the Webster's Dictionary definition of "privilege" and then leads to historical perspectives on "privilege" related to race in the United States. Another component of the lesson is the use of the Privilege Aptitude Test adapted from the National Civil Rights Museum at the Lorraine Motel with follow-up reflection questions. Use the link to print or download the lesson in PDF format.

tag(s): civil rights (142), psychology (66), racism (40)

In the Classroom

Include this lesson plan with your other resources when teaching lessons on racism and social injustice, either in-person or through remote or blended learning situations. Instead of using paper charts as mentioned in the lesson, use a digital chart creation resource such as Lucidchart, reviewed here, to create collaborative digital workspaces. Lucidchart includes several features that expand learning through the use of commenting, real-time collaboration, and colorful visual displays. Guide students in how to think through reflection questions using topics available in Thinkalong, reviewed here. Thinkalong offers an interactive multimedia format that guides students through investigations that lead them to contemplate possible solutions to serious problems.
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