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How Do Human Rights Work? - Equality and Human Rights Commission

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8 to 12
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How Do Human Rights Work? is one of twelve lessons offered by the Equality and Human Rights Commission that teaches students about different components of human rights. This lesson...more
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How Do Human Rights Work? is one of twelve lessons offered by the Equality and Human Rights Commission that teaches students about different components of human rights. This lesson begins with a quiz that asks students to consider additional questions about their understanding and views on human rights. The main lessons take a look at human rights throughout history, focusing on modern ideas of human rights that developed after the Holocaust. This lesson includes a complete Teacher's Guide and support materials, with student worksheets and lesson slides.

tag(s): civil rights (152), holocaust (39), identity (26), religions (64), social and emotional learning (56), world war 2 (134)

In the Classroom

Include this lesson as part of lessons teaching about the Holocaust and human rights. Engage students by replacing the quiz on the included slide with an interactive quiz response tool such as Quizizz, reviewed here. Use the PowerPoint slide presentation as a starting point to make an interactive learning experience using Google Slides, reviewed here, or Microsoft PowerPoint, reviewed here. Add links to additional resources, videos, and images to enhance student learning. Extend learning by asking students to create a human rights campaign using Canva for Education, reviewed here. Canva for Education provides options for creating media such as infographics, presentations, and videos.
 This resource requires PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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Equality and Human Rights Lesson Plan Ideas - Equality and Human Rights Commission

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8 to 12
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This series of twelve lessons provides resources for teaching an understanding of human rights issues and discovering how to take action toward human rights issues in students' communities....more
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This series of twelve lessons provides resources for teaching an understanding of human rights issues and discovering how to take action toward human rights issues in students' communities. It isn't necessary to teach all lessons in the order given; however, it provides a framework for instruction that begins with learning about empathy, discrimination, and prejudice and guides students toward self-reflection. Each lesson includes teacher notes, supplementary materials such as videos, student worksheets, and PowerPoint slides. The videos reside on YouTube. If your district blocks YouTube, then they may not be viewable.

tag(s): civil rights (152), empathy (27), identity (26), social and emotional learning (56)

In the Classroom

Include these lessons among your resources when teaching Citizenship, as part of English lessons, or within your Personal Social Health and Economic Education (PHSEE) Standards. Many lessons provide excellent resources for use by school counselors to provide support in social and emotional learning. If time is limited, divide students into groups that participate in different lessons then share their learning with peers. If dividing up lessons, consider having all students complete the final two lessons that focus on personal attitudes and discussions of equality within local communities. Engage students by beginning lessons with a simple group response tool such as Answer Garden, reviewed here. Provide a prompt in Answer Garden and ask students to respond; Answer Garden creates a word cloud based on the answers. Enhance student learning using EdPuzzle, reviewed here, when watching videos. Add comments, questions, and additional information within the videos to guide students toward a deeper understanding of the content. As a final extension activity, ask students to prepare a plan for their community that focuses on improving human rights locally. Use Adobe Spark for Education, reviewed here, to prepare a video or website to share with local officials.
 This resource requires PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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OK2Ask: MakeCode: Bring Computational Thinking into Any Classroom - TeachersFirst

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3 to 12
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This recording of an OK2Ask online professional learning session is from November 2021. You can register and immediately view the archive of the session.

Prepare your students
...more
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This recording of an OK2Ask online professional learning session is from November 2021. You can register and immediately view the archive of the session.

Prepare your students to use today's digital tools to help solve tomorrow's problems. Pattern recognition, abstraction, algorithmic thinking, and decomposition are core thinking skills that can be applied to any subject. Learn how to integrate these components into any content area using Microsoft MakeCode projects and Hacking STEM lessons--hands-on activities that engage students immediately. As a result of this session, teachers will: 1. Review the fundamentals of computational thinking and how they can be applied across K-12 disciplines; 2. Explore MakeCode and Hacking STEM, two resources that promote computational thinking; and 3. Plan for the use of computational thinking in the classroom. This session is appropriate for teachers at all technology levels.

tag(s): coding (75), computational thinking (33), Microsoft (65), professional development (261)

In the Classroom

The archive of this teacher-friendly, hands-on webinar will empower and inspire you to use learning technology in the classroom and for professional productivity. As appropriate, specific classroom examples and ideas have been shared. View the session with a few of your teaching colleagues to find and share new ideas. Find additional information and links to tools at the session resource page. Learn more about OK2Ask and upcoming sessions here.

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Twitter Chat: Trust the Process: Computational Thinking - TeachersFirst

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K to 12
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This archived Twitter chat is from November 2021 and will open in Wakelet. The title of this chat is: Trust the Process: Computational Thinking. During this chat, participants: 1. Defined...more
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This archived Twitter chat is from November 2021 and will open in Wakelet. The title of this chat is: Trust the Process: Computational Thinking. During this chat, participants: 1. Defined and discussed computational thinking strategies, 2. Explored tools and resources for computational thinking, and 3. Shared computational thinking classroom integration ideas.

tag(s): computational thinking (33), twitterchatarchive (119)

In the Classroom

Find resources and information about computational thinking. Share this chat with your colleagues looking for strategies and resources on computational thinking.

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War to End All Wars: Looking at World War 1 Through the Eyes of Literature - TeachersFirst

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6 to 12
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Discover and learn about events leading up to and including World War 1 by incorporating the many activities and literature suggestions found within this portion of TeachersFirst's...more
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Discover and learn about events leading up to and including World War 1 by incorporating the many activities and literature suggestions found within this portion of TeachersFirst's Help! I Lost My Media Specialist page. Begin with the Background Knowledge information to understand the events leading up to the World War and follow through to the global impact of the war. Next, choose from the shared book list to find books to share during your lessons, along with suggested teaching activities. Additional suggestions include extension lessons to enhance learning. All information correlates to AASL National School Library Standards.

tag(s): 1900s (51), 1910s (7), 1920s (7), europe (69), primary sources (99), veterans (19), world war 1 (59)

In the Classroom

Be sure to see all of the many ideas and activities shared on this site to engage students as they learn about World War 1. Organize and share resources with students using a curation tool such as Netboard, reviewed here. Netboard makes it easy to share links, documents, text, and more into one easily accessible location. Extend learning by asking students to share their knowledge using the tools found at Adobe Spark for Education, reviewed here. Options include tools for creating videos, web pages, and graphics to demonstrate understanding of learning objectives.
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Flight 93 National Memorial - National Park Service

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5 to 12
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The Flight 93 National Memorial serves as the final resting place for the passenger and crew who stopped a terrorist attack on September 11, 2001. The National Park Service provides...more
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The Flight 93 National Memorial serves as the final resting place for the passenger and crew who stopped a terrorist attack on September 11, 2001. The National Park Service provides visitor information and detailed information about the events of this tragic flight. Use this information to learn about the memorial site and the Tower of Voices monument dedicated to the flight's crew and passengers. The videos on this site reside on YouTube. If your district blocks YouTube, then they may not be viewable.

tag(s): sept11 (16), terrorism (42)

In the Classroom

Include this site with your other September 11 resources to share with students. Use Padlet, reviewed here, to curate and share resources in one location. Additionally, Padlet includes a timeline feature. Ask students to construct a timeline of events leading up to and beyond the hijacking and subsequent crash of the airplane as a visual tool for understanding this chain of events concerning other attacks that took place on September 11. Include links to images, videos, newspaper articles, and more on the students' timeline. Extend learning using Google My Maps, reviewed here, to create a virtual map of September 11 events that provides a broader look at the different locations and outcomes of the terrorist attacks.

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World History Encyclopedia - World History Foundation

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6 to 12
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The World History Encyclopedia takes encyclopedias to the next level through the addition of media, timelines, teaching materials, and much more. Use the keyword search to find specific...more
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The World History Encyclopedia takes encyclopedias to the next level through the addition of media, timelines, teaching materials, and much more. Use the keyword search to find specific information or select the index to find content in alphabetical order or by region or date. Explore interactive maps of prehistoric sites, the Roman Empire, and more. This encyclopedia also shares many downloadable lessons and curated collections. Finally, don't forget to visit the media library to find images, videos, 3D images, and audio recordings.

tag(s): china (59), climate change (74), colonial america (90), egypt (43), explorers (60), greeks (29), japan (54), maps (220), medieval (27), primary sources (99), religions (64), romans (31), slavery (55), vikings (10), women (99)

In the Classroom

This site is a must-have for any history teacher. First, bookmark the site for students to use as a multimedia encyclopedia and media resource. Then, include it with your other teaching resources to find engaging classroom lessons. Have students use the images on this site when creating presentations (using proper attribution, of course). Enhance student learning by having them use Genially, reviewed here, an excellent tool for students to use to create interactive and multimedia presentations. Have students add images to presentations, then create "hotspots" that link to outside resources such as videos, articles, or student-created texts.
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Mensa for Kids - Mensa Foundation

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K to 9
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Mensa for Kids provides free, high-quality resources for kids and educators that promote empowering intelligence in children. To promote reading across a variety of genres, take advantage...more
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Mensa for Kids provides free, high-quality resources for kids and educators that promote empowering intelligence in children. To promote reading across a variety of genres, take advantage of the Excellence in Reading Program. This program provides reading lists by grade categories that students print, then rate books on a five-star system. Complete the entire list and return to Mensa for Kids to receive a free t-shirt! Select the "Teach" category to find lesson plans and TED Connection Guides for classroom use. The Games portion of the site shares math and language activities shared in conjunction with Arcademics, reviewed here.

tag(s): africa (137), colors (59), genetics (67), geometric shapes (129), gifted (64), hurricanes (28), literature (220), probability (94), STEM (218), stories and storytelling (30), writing (283)

In the Classroom

Enrollment in Mensa isn't required to take advantage of the many resources found on this site for all students. Use the reading lists as a starting point for stocking your class library or a student reading list for the current school year. Encourage students to complete the reading list and return to Mensa for a free t-shirt. Incorporate the lesson plans into your existing curriculum, then differentiate learning as you adapt to student needs. For example, use the Book Review Writing lesson to help students understand the difference between reviews and reports. This lesson also includes specific information on what to have with book reports. Begin by teaching this lesson in small groups, then use Google Jamboard, reviewed here, to create a frame for each of the main topics. Enhance student learning by asking students to add sticky notes with their observations and thoughts. Have your group work together to share their book review using a simple to use blogging tool such as Telegraph, reviewed here. Extend learning further by creating a class podcast sharing book reviews created through the lesson process found on Mensa for Kids. Buzzsprout, reviewed here, is a free tool for creating and publishing podcasts that is appropriate for students of all ages. Use Buzzsprout to record and share book reviews throughout the school year.
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TheyDiffer - TheyDiffer.com

Grades
4 to 12
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Sometimes it is difficult to understand the difference between two items or concepts; TheyDiffer explains differences in simple, easy-to-understand terms. For example, browse the home...more
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Sometimes it is difficult to understand the difference between two items or concepts; TheyDiffer explains differences in simple, easy-to-understand terms. For example, browse the home page to find recent additions that explain the difference between real and fake diamonds or why llamas and alpacas are confused for the other. Another browsing option is to select from the categories provided, including health, technology, and many more. Each explanation begins with a table summary that compares the two items. Following the comparisons are definitions of each term and a final overview.

tag(s): animals (264), environment (221), nutrition (132), plants (135), Research (52), space (202), STEM (218), vocabulary (231), weather (156)

In the Classroom

Bookmark TheyDiffer on classroom computers for students to use as a quick guide for exploring commonly misunderstood differences. Consider using Symbaloo, reviewed here, as a resource to curate and share bookmarked resources on classroom computers or share a link to your Symbaloo on your class web page. Use TheyDiffer as an example for students to enhance learning by sharing their comparisons of information or concepts. For example, as students compare life in the early 1900s to life in the 21st century, use the model provided for students to create infographics using Canva Infographic Maker, reviewed here. Extend learning by having students include their infographics with other research and create Sway, reviewed here, presentations. Include videos, images, text, and more in Sway presentations to create interactive multimedia reports.

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WisdomMaps - Terrence Monroe

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9 to 12
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WisdomMaps uses the power of MindMeister, reviewed here, to provide a collection of over 50 interactive learning map sets. Select any map from the...more
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WisdomMaps uses the power of MindMeister, reviewed here, to provide a collection of over 50 interactive learning map sets. Select any map from the list to open and explore concepts and information related to the activity. Key to the concept of WisdomMaps is the ability for you to view information through exploration of the different ideas and concepts offered. Topics include history and ethical topics from around the world and across different times.

tag(s): american revolution (73), asia (69), central america (14), ethics (23), greece (25), industrial revolution (20), north america (13), religions (64), renaissance (32), romans (31), south america (38)

In the Classroom

Share WisdomMaps with students as a blended learning activity by allowing students to explore a shared map before discussing ideas together as a class. Provide a collaborative Google Jamboard, reviewed here, and ask students to add sticky notes with information discovered through their exploration. Consider either creating columns for information found and another for questions that need further exploration. Use the WisdomMaps found on this site as a model for students to create maps using MindMeister, reviewed here, that correlate with your current classroom curriculum.

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A History of Ideas - BBC Radio

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9 to 12
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A History of Ideas is a weekly podcast dedicated to discussions of the work and theories of philosophers. Host Melvyn Bragg and his guests explore everyday topics through the lens ...more
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A History of Ideas is a weekly podcast dedicated to discussions of the work and theories of philosophers. Host Melvyn Bragg and his guests explore everyday topics through the lens of philosophy content. Recent topics include the role of social media in how individuals adapt their persona according to their audience and Aristotle's Guide to the Good Life as it relates to contemporary living. Podcasts include animated videos and are available to explore by theme. Included is an archive of past episodes dating back to 2018.

tag(s): ethics (23), gifted (64), podcasts (61)

In the Classroom

Include this podcast in your philosophy classrooms or as a critical thinking activity within gifted and talented classrooms. Introduce the work of philosophers and philosophical discussions through the use of student choice boards. For example, create a Wakelet collection, reviewed here, that provides links to several different topics found in the podcast archives and allow students (or student groups) to use that as a starting point for their activity. Ask students to use Wakelet to create a collaborative collection that includes information based on their research. Items might include videos, articles, and websites that support all sides of their philosophical discussion. As a final extended learning activity, have students create animated presentations using Beautiful.AI, reviewed here. For example, have students use the template created as an "Influencer Marketing Proposal" as a starting point for convincing others that their philosophy is the correct way to look at the information.

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The Living New Deal - Dept of Geography, University of California Berkeley

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8 to 12
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The Living New Deal is a crowd-sourced project that employs a three-part focus on Franklin Roosevelt's "New Deal" program. This site provides comprehensive resources for learning about...more
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The Living New Deal is a crowd-sourced project that employs a three-part focus on Franklin Roosevelt's "New Deal" program. This site provides comprehensive resources for learning about the New Deal through a variety of formats. First, choose Maps & Sites to find New Deal projects by city, state, project categories, architect, and more. The tab labeled "New Deal" provides a more extensive overview of the program with options that include a timeline, information about the programs included in the New Deal, and a discussion of the New Deal and race. Additional resources on this site include videos, oral histories, and resources for teachers.

tag(s): 1900s (51), great depression (25), new deal (4), roosevelt (10)

In the Classroom

Bookmark this site as a resource to include lessons about the New Deal, the Great Depression, and America in the 1900s. As you introduce information about the New Deal, engage students and provide deeper understanding by creating an interactive timeline using Time Graphics Timeline Maker, reviewed here. This timeline creation tool has many features so you can include videos, images, links, and more. Enhance learning by taking a broader look at the New Deal, as shown on the site's timeline. Create groups for students to explore the periods before, during, and after the New Deal. Ask these groups to share presentations about what they learned using Genially, reviewed here. Use Genially features to create interactive presentations that include the timeline you created and add more detailed information on the focus of the period studied. As a final activity, extend learning by creating a series of podcasts that discuss the different aspects of the New Deal. Examples might include podcasts that explore the different portions of the timeline, a look at programs and their impact on bolstering the economy, and a look back from the current time to analyze lessons learned from this social program. Consider using a podcast tool such as Buzzsprout, reviewed here.
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OK2Ask: Classroom Activities to Promote Computational Thinking - TeachersFirst

Grades
1 to 12
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This recording of an OK2Ask online professional learning session is from November 2021. You can register and immediately view the archive of the session.

Computational
...more
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This recording of an OK2Ask online professional learning session is from November 2021. You can register and immediately view the archive of the session.

Computational thinking prepares students to understand how to use today's digital tools to help solve tomorrow's problems. Most teachers are already teaching elements of computational thinking without knowing it. This workshop will help participants understand the fundamental tenets of computational thinking, most notably, how this concept combines critical thinking skills with the power of computing to make decisions or find solutions. Learn how to infuse computational thinking into your classroom activities across all core content areas. As a result of this session, teachers will: 1. Learn the fundamentals of computational thinking; 2. Explore activities and resources that promote computational thinking; and 3. Plan for the use of computational thinking in the classroom. This session is appropriate for teachers at all technology levels.

tag(s): computational thinking (33), professional development (261)

In the Classroom

The archive of this teacher-friendly, hands-on webinar will empower and inspire you to use learning technology in the classroom and for professional productivity. As appropriate, specific classroom examples and ideas have been shared. View the session with a few of your teaching colleagues to find and share new ideas. Find additional information and links to tools at the session resource page. Learn more about OK2Ask and upcoming sessions here.

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Free YouTube to MP3 Convertor - AceThinker

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K to 12
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YouTube is a fantastic resource, but using YouTube videos in the classroom can be difficult in various situations. Make it easier by converting any YouTube video to a downloadable MP3...more
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YouTube is a fantastic resource, but using YouTube videos in the classroom can be difficult in various situations. Make it easier by converting any YouTube video to a downloadable MP3 file to play directly from your device. Paste the link to your video and click the link to begin the download. The footage quickly converts into an MP3 file that is ready to download and use. This site also works as a resource for downloading music, entering a song's name, and searching. Download the results to your device as a music or audio file after choosing the desired selection.

tag(s): conversions (31), movies (55), video (242)

In the Classroom

Avoid problems with low bandwidth or filters that block YouTube by using this site to solve many of your classroom video issues. After downloading videos, share them with students in presentations created with multimedia tools like Sway, reviewed here or upload to your Google Classroom as part of assigned activity. Add additional resources such as links and quizzes, then share as a blended learning activity. This should primarily be a teacher resource. If using with students, discuss appropriate and inappropriate uses of the technology as well as choosing necessary videos.
 

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25 Creative Social Emotional Learning Activities - Institute for Arts Integration and STEAM

Grades
K to 12
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This fantastic article explains the five core competencies of Social Emotional Learning (SEL) and many ideas for incorporating SEL activities into the arts. Scroll through the site...more
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This fantastic article explains the five core competencies of Social Emotional Learning (SEL) and many ideas for incorporating SEL activities into the arts. Scroll through the site to find ideas for building classroom communities through simple yet effective actions like doorway greetings and handshakes. In addition, discover more ideas for team building, creating safe learning environments, and teaching students how to handle stress and anxiety. Also included is a downloadable PDF that shares specific activities for each of the five core competencies.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): social and emotional learning (56)

In the Classroom

Use the ideas found in this article as a starting point for incorporating the arts into SEL activities and lessons. Share the PDF found on this site with parents as information on helping students at home. Ask students to share their ideas on each of the five different competencies by creating and sharing images made in Canva for Education, reviewed here. Introduce a new competency weekly or monthly to help develop student awareness of each skill. As your students create and share images, add them to a class book made with Book Creator, reviewed here, for students to use as an ongoing resource and reminder of suggested techniques to improve social-emotional awareness.
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Bit - Bit.ai

Grades
9 to 12
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Bit is a platform created for individuals and collaborative teams to organize and share documents seamlessly. Similar to Google Documents and Microsoft Word, Bit offers the ability...more
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Bit is a platform created for individuals and collaborative teams to organize and share documents seamlessly. Similar to Google Documents and Microsoft Word, Bit offers the ability to add images, tables, and add links to files. Bit then offers additional features, including individual and team workspaces and company wikis. Start with a blank document or choose from templates for meeting notes, project goals, and brainstorming. Next, add collaborators or share a document with a link or by embedding it onto a website. All collaborators must have a Bit account, use the invite button to share registration information with potential collaborators. Be sure to follow the quick start guide or watch the Bit Academy videos for a complete overview of the features found on this site. Free plans include the ability to add five members and create up to fifty documents. Storage size for free accounts is 1GB with a 5MB file limit.

tag(s): collaboration (83), organizational skills (92)

In the Classroom

Use Bit to collaborate with peers when planning units, researching new textbooks and programs, or as you work with parent/teacher organizations. Have older students use Bit as an organizational tool as they work together on collaborative projects. Use the templates found in Bit to help students share resources and add digital content to their work product. Consider asking tech-savvy students to create video tutorials of Bit's features using Free Screen Recorder Online, reviewed here, to have available as students begin to use this product.

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Learning Apps - Learning Apps

Grades
3 to 12
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Create and share personalized learning activities using tools found at Learning Apps. Use the templates to create tools in various formats, including games, matching exercises, puzzles,...more
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Create and share personalized learning activities using tools found at Learning Apps. Use the templates to create tools in various formats, including games, matching exercises, puzzles, and cloze reading texts. Begin by selecting a template and choosing an option from the examples provided. Next, add information to fill in each of the parts of the template, such as title, description, image, and links or content. When finished, view the preview, then save the app to your account. Editor's note: this site includes apps that are ready to use; however, many are not in English. In addition, a small portion of instructions for building an app may be in a different language, use a translating tool such as the one found at Linguee, reviewed here, to see the directions in English.

tag(s): flash cards (38), game based learning (158), vocabulary (231)

In the Classroom

Take advantage of the free resources provided by Learning Apps to create activities for students to practice content in various formats. For example, make apps for students to complete timelines for books, historical events, or the steps in conducting a science experiment. Use the cloze learning activity to reinforce new vocabulary in a language arts class or scientific terms. Extend learning by asking students to create apps to share with their peers as part of your review activities at the end of any teaching unit. Consider using a screen recording tool such as Free Screen Recorder Online, reviewed here, to share tutorials on how to create the different types of apps and have them available for students to use.

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Kleki - Kleki

Grades
6 to 12
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Kleki is a free online image editing tool that doesn't require registration. Features include creating multiple layers of images, adding filters, including text and drawing elements,...more
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Kleki is a free online image editing tool that doesn't require registration. Features include creating multiple layers of images, adding filters, including text and drawing elements, and more. Use Kleki's Help feature to locate and use shortcuts and learn about many of the available tools. When finished, download your image to your device in a PNG or PSD format.

tag(s): editing (80), images (254)

In the Classroom

Challenge students to learn about the different options and features included with Kleki, then create and share video tutorials for their peers using a screen recording tool like Free Screen Recorder Online, reviewed here. As your students become familiar with the different features, have them include their edited images in any multimedia projects. Include images when using Adobe Spark K-12, reviewed here, to create videos, flyers, or websites. Include images with storytelling projects created with Sway, reviewed here.
 

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Interdisciplinary Civics Education Lessons - United4SC

Grades
6 to 12
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Teach fundamental civic skills and concepts using the videos and lessons provided by United4SC. Select from the many different topics, including economics, history, democracy, and more,...more
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Teach fundamental civic skills and concepts using the videos and lessons provided by United4SC. Select from the many different topics, including economics, history, democracy, and more, to find materials that engage students in enhanced thinking activities. Each lesson includes a video along with downloadable lesson plans and student worksheets. The videos are hosted on YouTube. If your district blocks YouTube, then they may not be viewable.

tag(s): branches of government (57), civil rights (152), constitution (85), democracy (17), diseases (71), elections (75), environment (221), ethics (23), media literacy (88), pilgrims (14), psychology (64), racism (68), slavery (55), supreme court (24)

In the Classroom

Bookmark this excellent resource for use throughout the year to engage students as they learn about various social studies topics. Luckily, this site includes a link to each of the videos that are shared on EdPuzzle, reviewed here. Use these links to create and share video lessons with your students, including notes, quizzes, and comments extending learning. Use the included lesson plans as a starting point for your lessons, then ask students to extend learning by sharing information through various choices. For example, offer students options for creating a podcast teaching about one of the topics using Buzzsprout, reviewed here. Buzzsprout includes options to personalize podcasts, such as the ability to add links to show notes and the option to schedule episodes for release at specific times and dates; in addition offer Genially, reviewed here, where students can choose to create interactive presentations, images, infographics, charts, and anything else you can think of.
 This resource requires PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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Untold History - Driving Force Institute for Public Engagement

Grades
5 to 12
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Bring history to life with the short 2-minute videos and animations found at Unknown History. The videos engage students in history by sharing little-known stories and tales from the...more
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Bring history to life with the short 2-minute videos and animations found at Unknown History. The videos engage students in history by sharing little-known stories and tales from the past. Return often to view new weekly additions. Scroll through the home page to find the most recent topics, or select the "all videos" link to choose by collections. The subjects in the collections include America Explained, Museums of Artifacts that Made America, Hidden Figures, and more. The videos are hosted on YouTube. If your district blocks YouTube, then they may not be viewable.

tag(s): democracy (17), great depression (25), medicine (54), presidents (115), speeches (19), sports (82), symbols (13), women (99)

In the Classroom

These short videos are perfect to use in many different classroom settings to engage students in various history topics. Share a video at the beginning of a lesson, then use Google Jamboard, reviewed here, to gather student's questions for further investigation of the concept. Extend learning by asking groups of students to go further in-depth to learn more about the content of the shared video. Have students share resources by creating a collection in Wakelet, reviewed here. Use Wakelet's templates as a starting point for student presentations. Enhance student learning by creating short video presentations based on a different unknown event in history. Use Renderforest, reviewed here, to create animated videos or Biteable, reviewed here, as a resource for easily creating video explanations.

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